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Cowboy up
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Riding out to a Tuesday night club race a woman in the group was working on a flat on the side of the road. She responded “no” when asked if she had everything. Five guys stopped to help.

While fixing the flat she asks if anyone has a frame pump? I’m the only one that did. One guy said “I thought those things went the way of the dinosaur.”

Why don’t people carry frame pumps as much now? My understanding is that you can inflate the tire to as high a pressure as with CO2 (120 psi for both I’m guessing). Plus a frame pump seems more reliable and you don’t have to hassle with the cartridges.

How often do CO2 inflators not work both when you are inexperienced with them and experienced? I thought someone said once that you can shoot all the air out of the cartridge accidentally and have little air go into the tube. Is this a drawback of CO2 and are there others?

What are the benefits of CO2? Slightly faster inflation speed? But you still have to attach the cartridge. They are smaller but my frame pump doesn’t take up room in the seat bag. The weight difference wouldn’t seem to be a big factor for general riding and club racing situations.
 

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You said it.

smaller and faster inflation.

In a group ride they are the way to go.
If you have a second flat then get a buddies tube and use his c02 inflater.

On a solo ride I take a patch kit and extra tube along with frame pump(real frame pump that mounts on frame).
 

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Rollin' Stones
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Amen to that.

Spoke Wrench said:
CO2 is the bicycling equivalent of a microwave oven.
I'm just now cooling off from a ride that I had a [email protected] on. My CO2 worked great. But it doesn't provide the peace of mind a good pump does for me. A good pump is like a home oven, slower but more precise and better results. A CO2 is like a microwave, easy to use, fine results. :)
 

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That's the system I use also..

Nessism said:
I carry a mini-pump and CO2. Use the mini to seat the tire bead and inflate to 20psi or so, then shoot a cheap 12 gram CO2 to finish off the job. Mini is available in case of a second flat on the same ride (unlikely). CO2 is much faster, and the mini-pump is smaller/lighter/less bulky than a frame pump.

Ed

I pack both. Use a Blackburn A1 Airstick mini to seat the tire, inflate to around 30 pounds and finish off with a $.50 12g cartridge of co2. I also have a full length Blackburn FP1 that I pack if I am going for a solo long ride in the middle of nowhere. I have problems getting enough air into my tire with a full length pump. I've snapped off valve stems and have been stuck. I guess I don't have a big enough problem with flats to have mastered the use of a frame pump, if I could, I'd just pack one and leave the co2 at home.

Also most new bikes don't have pump pegs and I scratched the paint on my Colnago rigging up a ziploc tie as a subsitute.

I also pack two spare tubes, plus a patch kit.

The best system is the one that works for you..
 

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I use a Zefal HPX and have for years. It gets the tire to 120 PSI easily and there is no landfill filler when am done with it. One two occasions I went for several months with my HPX as my only pump and it worked great.

If they ever stop making them I am hording them.
 

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saab2000 said:
I use a Zefal HPX and have for years. It gets the tire to 120 PSI easily and there is no landfill filler when am done with it. One two occasions I went for several months with my HPX as my only pump and it worked great.

If they ever stop making them I am hording them.
Landfill filler? They are made of steel. Recycle the spent CO2 cartridges, I do.

A 16gram CO2 cartridge gets the tire to 120 lbs in seconds. You don't need a frame pump to get the tire to 20 pounds and then use a frame pump. A good CO2 adapter allows you to control the flow of the gas. Frame pumps are like down tube shifters...quaint!

If someone stops with a flat, I'll use my CO2 to get him/her going again.
 

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I switched to c02

After a couple of frustrating, failed attempts to get any sort of reasonable pressure with a mini-pump. I also tried a full frame zefal pump, but got too annoyed with it; it took forever to get pressure out of it, I could only manage ~105 psi, not 120, and having it across the top tube made carring my bike up the 8 flights of stairs to my apartment really, really annoying.

c02 - Bam, whap, hiss, done. Group can get back on the road in 2 minutes instead of 6. Yeah, recycling the spent steel is the way to go.

I think c02 today is like what 1 spare tubular tire under the seat was in the past; not enough for solo touring, but in a group, not EVERYONE's going to blow up at once. I'd carry my frame pump if I toured or something.
 

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I use a mini pump and co2. I use crank bros mini pump to seat the tire and put in 40 psi in the tire. Then I use the co2 to finish the job. Maybe I'm doing something wrong but I only get about 40 psi out of a 12 gram cartridge. This is for a 700x25 tire. The crank bros pump mini pump is only 5 1/2 inches long. I can fit a co2 and the mini pump, spare tube, patch kit and tire levers in my saddle bag.
 

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Cannot bench own weight
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Problem with CO2 is that you only have N number of chances on a ride. Where N = number of cartridges carried. I've had problems where the bead wasn't set, and I wasted a whole cartridge because of it. And if you have one of those days where you get two or three flats, you could be really screwed.

Now having said all that, I still just carry CO2 (x3). If I ever manage to get above 200km on a ride, it'll be time to start using a real frame pump. PeaceOfMind++
 

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$$$$$

merckx56 said:
Landfill filler? They are made of steel. Recycle the spent CO2 cartridges, I do.

A 16gram CO2 cartridge gets the tire to 120 lbs in seconds. You don't need a frame pump to get the tire to 20 pounds and then use a frame pump. A good CO2 adapter allows you to control the flow of the gas. Frame pumps are like down tube shifters...quaint!

If someone stops with a flat, I'll use my CO2 to get him/her going again.
16g are a good way to go, however the 16g unthreaded cartridges are expensive, around what, $4.50 per cartridge? You can buy the 12g in bulk and use more than 1 cartridge if you need more air. I found the mini plus a couple of 12g works the best for me. However I'm a senior citizen living on a fixed income and money is the deciding factor. Or if you know a place that sells the 16g for cheap let me know..

dino
 

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I'm surprised no one has mentioned the mini pumps with the little hoses. I have one I bought for $10 from Performance on sale. I think Topeak makes one too. They're bigger than the average mini but are very easy to get the tire up to pressure. I also have C02, but anytime I'm riding very far from home, the big mini makes the trip with me.
 

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...

Art853 said:
Riding out to a Tuesday night club race a woman in the group was working on a flat on the side of the road. She responded “no” when asked if she had everything. Five guys stopped to help.

While fixing the flat she asks if anyone has a frame pump? I’m the only one that did. One guy said “I thought those things went the way of the dinosaur.”

Why don’t people carry frame pumps as much now? My understanding is that you can inflate the tire to as high a pressure as with CO2 (120 psi for both I’m guessing). Plus a frame pump seems more reliable and you don’t have to hassle with the cartridges.

How often do CO2 inflators not work both when you are inexperienced with them and experienced? I thought someone said once that you can shoot all the air out of the cartridge accidentally and have little air go into the tube. Is this a drawback of CO2 and are there others?

What are the benefits of CO2? Slightly faster inflation speed? But you still have to attach the cartridge. They are smaller but my frame pump doesn’t take up room in the seat bag. The weight difference wouldn’t seem to be a big factor for general riding and club racing situations.
I've saved a couple of people this year with my Zefal frame pump. I have used CO2 on my mountain bike to get home. You don't get a lot of 2nd chances with CO2 unless you want to carry more cartridges. With the frame pump you have infinite air... My bike has a pump peg so it works nice, but that isn't cool as I notice newer rigs don't,this people resort to other means.
 

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n00bsauce
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Although I'm a CO2 user I must take issue with your downtube shifter comment. I recently built up a travel bike with S&S couplers from and "89 Schwinn and full Sante group. 7spd downtube SIS. It had been awhile since I used downtube shifters but it came back just like riding a bike (imagine that!). I was amazed and pleasantly surprised by the quality of the shifting. It feels very positive and very smooth. I even quickly remembered the pause needed when shifting to the big ring. Overall, I like the solid feel and sewing machine preciseness of downtube shifting and prefer it to brifters. As a comparison I have Campy 10spd (Chorus/Record) on one road bike and Shimano 9spd (Ultegra) on another.

Now, back to the pumps. As I said I use CO2 almost exclusively but when travelling use a Zefal HPX because of the cartrige issue on planes. CO2 is so much easier, quicker and less work. You get back to biking with less muss and fuss. Not saying you can't mess up with CO2 but with a good inflator it's pretty hard.
 

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what downtube shifter comment?

Mel Erickson said:
Although I'm a CO2 user I must take issue with your downtube shifter comment. I recently built up a travel bike with S&S couplers from and "89 Schwinn and full Sante group. 7spd downtube SIS. It had been awhile since I used downtube shifters but it came back just like riding a bike (imagine that!). I was amazed and pleasantly surprised by the quality of the shifting. It feels very positive and very smooth. I even quickly remembered the pause needed when shifting to the big ring. Overall, I like the solid feel and sewing machine preciseness of downtube shifting and prefer it to brifters. As a comparison I have Campy 10spd (Chorus/Record) on one road bike and Shimano 9spd (Ultegra) on another.

Now, back to the pumps. As I said I use CO2 almost exclusively but when travelling use a Zefal HPX because of the cartrige issue on planes. CO2 is so much easier, quicker and less work. You get back to biking with less muss and fuss. Not saying you can't mess up with CO2 but with a good inflator it's pretty hard.
I've read all the threads and I did not see anything mentioned about downtube shifters. I mentioned pump pegs. (?)
 

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I heart team Zissou!
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no-brainer -- 2 in 1

Why worry about pump vs. CO2, you can have both in one! I carry around this little number from Barbieri -- mini pump to seat the tube, cartridge to fill it to 120 and mini-pump if you flat again (I carry one extra cartridge just in case and have used the pump to inflate up to 110 psi). Small, lightweight and multipurpose -- why spend time worrying about either or when you can have both!

A+

Philippe
 

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n00bsauce
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Look at Mercks56 right above my post.
 
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