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Hello all,

I bought my first road bike back in 2013, I used it on and off for the past coupe years but lately since moving have ramped up my riding and I'm riding about 75~ miles a week.

I can never seem to get comfortable or find a sweet spot to crank away on my bike, when I scoot back I feel good in the seat but completely stretched out in the arms, if I get my arms and upper body feeling good I'm way too forward in the saddle causing pain.

I've gotten a fit (somewhat basic) before and got a shorter stem 100 to a raised 90mm. I can't move my seat too much more forward.

I bought my bike from a large sporting goods store, I am 5' 10" and average build. The bike I got fit for was a Felt Z85 in a 58. I wanted to try a 56 but they did not have any in stock and was assured at the time that the fit/size was correct.

Thoughts? I feel like I should be on a 54/56 of an equivalent bike.,..


Thanks
 

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Hello all,

I bought my first road bike back in 2013, I used it on and off for the past coupe years but lately since moving have ramped up my riding and I'm riding about 75~ miles a week.

I can never seem to get comfortable or find a sweet spot to crank away on my bike, when I scoot back I feel good in the seat but completely stretched out in the arms, if I get my arms and upper body feeling good I'm way too forward in the saddle causing pain.

I've gotten a fit (somewhat basic) before and got a shorter stem 100 to a raised 90mm. I can't move my seat too much more forward.

I bought my bike from a large sporting goods store, I am 5' 10" and average build. The bike I got fit for was a Felt Z85 in a 58. I wanted to try a 56 but they did not have any in stock and was assured at the time that the fit/size was correct.

Thoughts? I feel like I should be on a 54/56 of an equivalent bike.,..


Thanks
You're right. You should be riding a 54/56. Do you have long legs and a short upper body? You need a shorter top tube for comfortable reach. I believe the fit programs at Colorado Cyclist and Wrench Science would show 54/56 as correct, with probably a 10 cm stem.
 

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I agree, it's too big. Is the seatpost straight or setback? If it's a setback post, you could replace it with a straight post to help move your saddle up a bit. But ultimately you need a different size. It's never going to feel right.
Shame on them for "assuring" you that you'd be ok on the bike they had in stock.
 

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Big box sport stores are a bad place to buy bikes. They advised you badly and you suffered the consequences.

I am 5' 10" and a 56 is what fits me. 54 fits some people my height and for some brands that fit on the high side. 58 is definitely too large.

Moving your seat post forward is usually not a good idea as that can put more stress on your knees.

What you need is to visit a reputable bike shop that will determine your correct fit.
 

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Hello all,

I bought my first road bike back in 2013, I used it on and off for the past coupe years but lately since moving have ramped up my riding and I'm riding about 75~ miles a week.

I can never seem to get comfortable or find a sweet spot to crank away on my bike, when I scoot back I feel good in the seat but completely stretched out in the arms, if I get my arms and upper body feeling good I'm way too forward in the saddle causing pain.

I've gotten a fit (somewhat basic) before and got a shorter stem 100 to a raised 90mm. I can't move my seat too much more forward.

I bought my bike from a large sporting goods store, I am 5' 10" and average build. The bike I got fit for was a Felt Z85 in a 58. I wanted to try a 56 but they did not have any in stock and was assured at the time that the fit/size was correct.

Thoughts? I feel like I should be on a 54/56 of an equivalent bike.,..


Thanks
Get a 70 or 80mm stem.
 

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Get a 70 or 80mm stem.
Could be a temporary solution, but really a Band-Aid on a broken leg.

I can't imagine any seat post is exposed.
 

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Great story about why not to buy from a sporting goods store or the internet but instead go to a reputable local bike store who will take the time to properly fit a customer. I too bought a bike that was too big for me over two decades ago. At the time I only rode about 30 miles per week on average but it was clear I made a bad decision on many levels(aluminum bike that rode harsh). The bike was a "great deal", but good price and bad fit is wasted money.
 

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Great story about why not to buy from a sporting goods store or the internet but instead go to a reputable local bike store who will take the time to properly fit a customer. I too bought a bike that was too big for me over two decades ago. At the time I only rode about 30 miles per week on average but it was clear I made a bad decision on many levels(aluminum bike that rode harsh). The bike was a "great deal", but good price and bad fit is wasted money.
Buy cheap, buy twice.
 

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Not disagreeing with anything anyone has said here about buying from big box stores, or even about whether this particular bike fits the OP.

But a number of comments in this thread assume that "54" and "56" and "58" have some meaning in themselves, as if there is such a thing as a "size 58 bike" and that it is always bigger than a "size 56 bike."

I just want to point out that that's not true. So-called sizes vary dramatically across brands, and no rider out there simply "is a size 54." For example, the size 58 Felt that the OP is riding has a reach of 392, while a size 56 CAAD12 has a reach of 393 – smaller "size" frame with more reach. I ride about 4 different bikes. One of them is a "58" and one of them is a "55." But the 58 I ride actually has LESS reach than the 55.

So the OP should get a bike that fits him properly, but he can't do that by going into a store and saying "I'm a 54." And even after he, or anyone else, gets one bike that fits him properly, he needs to find out what the exact stack and reach measurements are on that bike, and then replicate them on future bikes. Going from one "56" thats fits you perfectly doesn't mean that the next "56" will too – in a different frame you may need a 53 or a 58.

One other note to the OP: NEVER move your saddle to adjust reach. The saddle needs to be set at the right location for your frame and the length of your legs (including femur length, etc.), and it shouldn't move from there. Once the saddle is right, adjust reach with stems, stem angles, spacers, bars.
 

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Not disagreeing with anything anyone has said here about buying from big box stores, or even about whether this particular bike fits the OP.

But a number of comments in this thread assume that "54" and "56" and "58" have some meaning in themselves, as if there is such a thing as a "size 58 bike" and that it is always bigger than a "size 56 bike."

I just want to point out that that's not true. So-called sizes vary dramatically across brands, and no rider out there simply "is a size 54." For example, the size 58 Felt that the OP is riding has a reach of 392, while a size 56 CAAD12 has a reach of 393 – smaller "size" frame with more reach. I ride about 4 different bikes. One of them is a "58" and one of them is a "55." But the 58 I ride actually has LESS reach than the 55.

So the OP should get a bike that fits him properly, but he can't do that by going into a store and saying "I'm a 54." And even after he, or anyone else, gets one bike that fits him properly, he needs to find out what the exact stack and reach measurements are on that bike, and then replicate them on future bikes. Going from one "56" thats fits you perfectly doesn't mean that the next "56" will too – in a different frame you may need a 53 or a 58.

One other note to the OP: NEVER move your saddle to adjust reach. The saddle needs to be set at the right location for your frame and the length of your legs (including femur length, etc.), and it shouldn't move from there. Once the saddle is right, adjust reach with stems, stem angles, spacers, bars.
true dat.
 

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OP's bike it too big. Can't fix too big.

After a couple months off the bike, I don't feel comfortable for the first 600-800 miles on my bike (that would be miles in the first month back). If I take a week or so off, I feel like crap on the bike. I don't know how weekend warriors ever feel comfortable on bikes.
 

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One other note to the OP: NEVER move your saddle to adjust reach. The saddle needs to be set at the right location for your frame and the length of your legs (including femur length, etc.), and it shouldn't move from there. Once the saddle is right, adjust reach with stems, stem angles, spacers, bars.

This.

And while what you said about checking stack and reach is true, be sure to evaluate both stack AND reach. Comparing the Felt Z85 to the Cannondale CAAD12 is an apples to oranges comparison. The Z85 has a more relaxed geometry than the CAAD12. See below.

Z85 size 54 - Stack 560, Reach 381
Z85 size 56 - Stack 579, Reach 385
Z85 size 58 - Stack 598, Reach 389

CAAD12 size 54 Stack 551, Reach 387
CAAD12 size 56 Stack 567, Reach 393
CAAD12 size 58 Stack 584, Reach 399


Z85 - Felt Bicycles

CAAD12 105 Cannondale Bicycles
 

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This.

And while what you said about checking stack and reach is true, be sure to evaluate both stack AND reach. Comparing the Felt Z85 to the Cannondale CAAD12 is an apples to oranges comparison. The Z85 has a more relaxed geometry than the CAAD12. See below.

Z85 size 54 - Stack 560, Reach 381
Z85 size 56 - Stack 579, Reach 385
Z85 size 58 - Stack 598, Reach 389

CAAD12 size 54 Stack 551, Reach 387
CAAD12 size 56 Stack 567, Reach 393
CAAD12 size 58 Stack 584, Reach 399


Z85 - Felt Bicycles

CAAD12 105 Cannondale Bicycles
Yes, I totally agree – they are completely different bikes. I was just trying to make the simple point about "size" not telling you much, but you are of course right: the actual geometry of fit, using stack and reach, has multiple variables.

From what the OP said here, I didn't have any real sense at all about whether his bike had too much stack. Indeed, the big problem for him might be a stack problem, not a reach problem: the size 58 Z85 has ENORMOUS stack height, but a fairly reasonable amount of reach.

Like the OP, I'm 5'10", but I have a very long torso: I ride frames with a reach of about 392 (a bit more than his current bike) but with a stack of about 555 – more than 4cm less than his bike (which would not fit me for just that reason).
 

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OP's bike it too big. Can't fix too big.

After a couple months off the bike, I don't feel comfortable for the first 600-800 miles on my bike (that would be miles in the first month back). If I take a week or so off, I feel like crap on the bike. I don't know how weekend warriors ever feel comfortable on bikes.
The trick: warm up very slowly! :D
 

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This.

And while what you said about checking stack and reach is true, be sure to evaluate both stack AND reach. Comparing the Felt Z85 to the Cannondale CAAD12 is an apples to oranges comparison. The Z85 has a more relaxed geometry than the CAAD12. See below.

Z85 size 54 - Stack 560, Reach 381
Z85 size 56 - Stack 579, Reach 385
Z85 size 58 - Stack 598, Reach 389

CAAD12 size 54 Stack 551, Reach 387
CAAD12 size 56 Stack 567, Reach 393
CAAD12 size 58 Stack 584, Reach 399


Z85 - Felt Bicycles

CAAD12 105 Cannondale Bicycles
The Z85 has taller stack and shorter reach. Viewing the rider as a triangle, fit would be very close to the same. The geometry of the rider would be about the same, only canted slightly different. The distance in a straight line from crank to handlebars would be about the same.

Once saddle height is right, stack and reach is the most critical dimension for fit, the whole point of measuring by stack and reach.

Let me guess: the Z28 is more an upright endurance bike; the CAAD12 is more an aerodynamic racing bike. Leaning forward puts slightly more weight on the front wheel, nice for control when going hard or climbing, IMO.
 
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