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I got fitted today and was told I need a steep seat tube angle (like 74-75). Any manufacturers known for steep STAs (like older Looks were known for slack STAs)? Thanks.
 

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it depends on the size of the frame you need

rcnute said:
I got fitted today and was told I need a steep seat tube angle (like 74-75). Any manufacturers known for steep STAs (like older Looks were known for slack STAs)? Thanks.
for example Madone in 54cm size is 74 degree STA and Madone 51cm is even more but a 56/58cm is less = 73.5 etc. Look 555 is 53cm is 73.5 etc.
 

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steep angles

GIOS frames all have 74-degree seat tube angles. You can find them at www.excelsports.com. They carry steel, aluminum and carbon models. Coppi is another Italian frame that typically has steep angles.

I thought all LOOK frames had 72 seat tube angles. Has there been a change in their geometry recently?

I don't understand why you would need a steep seat tube angle, however. You could achieve the same fit with a frame having a 72 or 73 angle as long as the top tube length was fitted accordingly. Eg, I used to own a GIOS with a 55 top tube and 74 seat angle, it fit across the top almost identical to my Merckx with a 56.8 top tube and 72.5 seat angle. Sounds like your fitter could use a geometry lesson.
 

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Ditto.......
A 62 cm frame w/ 74 deg would be very strange.
 

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reason for steep STA

"I don't understand why you would need a steep seat tube angle, however."

i was fitted at the waterford factory and they recommended a 74 STA for me- they start by finding your knee over pedal center point, then adjust the fore/aft of the saddle until the rails are roughly centered over the seatpost. no doubt I could still ride a 72 STA bike with a longer TT but my saddle would be jammed almost all the way forward on the rails. so, people with weird femur lengths relative to their upper bodies might need a steeper STA. I ride at 60 cm.
 

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allezdude said:
"I don't understand why you would need a steep seat tube angle, however."

i was fitted at the waterford factory and they recommended a 74 STA for me- they start by finding your knee over pedal center point, then adjust the fore/aft of the saddle until the rails are roughly centered over the seatpost. no doubt I could still ride a 72 STA bike with a longer TT but my saddle would be jammed almost all the way forward on the rails. so, people with weird femur lengths relative to their upper bodies might need a steeper STA. I ride at 60 cm.
Yep, I have long legs for my height with averaged sized femurs, that means I have long lower legs which require a more upright seating position. DiLuca (Liquigas pro) rides a 75 degree seat tube.
 

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tarwheel2 said:
GIOS frames all have 74-degree seat tube angles. You can find them at www.excelsports.com. They carry steel, aluminum and carbon models. Coppi is another Italian frame that typically has steep angles.

I thought all LOOK frames had 72 seat tube angles. Has there been a change in their geometry recently?

I don't understand why you would need a steep seat tube angle, however. You could achieve the same fit with a frame having a 72 or 73 angle as long as the top tube length was fitted accordingly. Eg, I used to own a GIOS with a 55 top tube and 74 seat angle, it fit across the top almost identical to my Merckx with a 56.8 top tube and 72.5 seat angle. Sounds like your fitter could use a geometry lesson.


not exactly true.... Gios frames at the extreme sizes vary somewhat.

The reason you cannot always get the same fit is because of seatpost setbacks and because saddle rails are only so long. For example, if you had a zero setback post (or even one with forward "setback")- kinda rare- you might still need a saddle with relatively long rails to it push forward far enough. By doing so, the weight balance of the bike is even farther forward, which may not be ideal. You might even need a longer stem, which makes this worse.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks, everyone. Now I'm trying to get used to the look of a zero setback post with the saddle slammed all the way forward. Just looks wrong even though the fitter assured me it was copascetic.
 

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rcnute said:
Thanks, everyone. Now I'm trying to get used to the look of a zero setback post with the saddle slammed all the way forward. Just looks wrong even though the fitter assured me it was copascetic.
I was thinking how are you going to hook a saddle bag in there if you use one?

I have a set back post with the saddle pushed all the way back on a 73 degree seat tube. My entire saddle bag fits underneath my saddle without dangling or sticking out past the rear edge of the saddle.
 
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