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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
From reading, it seems the single thing I can do for improved performance would be to get lighter wheels. My bike has a nice frame, but has generic hubs, shimano 2200 series (just below Tiagra from the looks of it), and vitesse aluminum wheels.
Because I'm on a budget, I really can't afford a high price bike or even much of an upgrade. What would you recommend upgrading first, the front wheel or the rear wheel? Would I run into any issues in trying to keep the same cassette? Or, would you recommend something else first?
Finally, has anyone used both straight and curved forks? What do you notice the differences between the two? I've searched google, and come up with inconclusive answers.
 

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Little to no noticable difference between fork types.
People might feel differently.

As for which wheel to buy, front or rear.
Save up and buy the pair.
If you cannot save money then I would say front.
That then begs the question what are you trying to get out of this bike?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
planning on riding next year's MS 150 and looking to get in the shape I used to be in twelve years ago. Back then I was seriously considering getting into racing but I never took the chance. Thats one of my life's regrets...
I bought what I could afford when I got this bike, but I'm hoping eventually make it faster.
 

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Peanya said:
I bought what I could afford when I got this bike, but I'm hoping eventually make it faster.
Going faster will be 99% dependant on getting yourself in shape. I'd recommend working on that first. Save your money and if things go well maybe you can treat yourself to a whole new bike. Upgrading various parts here and there is rarely financially wise... you end up with a mix of some nice and some crappy parts on a cheap frame... and it costs more than the whole nice bike when you are done.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
yes I am well aware of that part, but I figure one good upgrade will do the trick. I am happy with my frame which is aluminum w/ carbon seat stays and fork. I imagine the front would be easiest, but the rear would be a bigger benefit with complications due to an eight speed.
 

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How old are you?

Peanya said:
looking to get in the shape I used to be in twelve years ago. Back then I was seriously considering getting into racing but I never took the chance. Thats one of my life's regrets....
If you don't mind my asking? It's not necessarily too late to try some racing. Find some lower-key club races or training crits in your area and give it a try. The problem with starting out older ("inexperienced master") is you're racing against either younger guys who are strong, but crazy and inexperienced, or guys your own age who are very experienced and still plenty strong. So it's a challenge. But it could be fun to try a little. I raced a little from my early 40's to my mid-50's. I never got good enough to hang with the good guys for long, but the experience made me a better and stronger cyclist.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I am 38 yet I have no where near the muscle mass I had when I was riding at age 23. It took many years of not riding before I lost it. Sadly, it was replaced by forty other pounds!
 

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Peanya said:
I am 38 yet I have no where near the muscle mass I had when I was riding at age 23. It took many years of not riding before I lost it. Sadly, it was replaced by forty other pounds!
Dude, my uncle never did any kind of strenuous physical activity in his life until 3 years ago when he started biking regularly. He just finished his first iron man this spring (2.5 mile swim, 112 mile bike, marathon run). Get training, then get racing!
 

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If your looking at just upgrading one wheel. I'm assuming your looking at a cheap wheel. Unless I mis-understand and your looking at one NICE wheel.

If upgrading 1 cheap wheel, I would skip it and save up. A cheap wheel is not gonna make much of a difference, and wheels are usually cheaper by the pair.
 

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If your bike has Shimano 2200 series components, it probably isn't worth upgrading wheels. Save your money for a bike with Shimano 105.
Use the bike you have now to get in condition. Use the bike you have now to learn. In another year, you will be able to appreciate a "better" bike.
 
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