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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just started riding a new road bike (aluminum; full ultegra). It was assembled and tuned by my LBS and everything seemed to be spot on except... When I stand up and pedal hard, the front wheel seems to be moving as I can hear it rubbing on both brake pads (this moves the front brake calipers off center). The wheels are brand new American Classic 420s and are supposed to be good. I'm on the bigger end at 6'4", 210lbs., but that shouldn't matter with good wheels that are tuned properly. Any ideas about the wheel problem? How do I keep my brake calipers from moving off center? Any help would be much appreciated! Thanks!
 

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Sadly this is likely your problem:

he wheels are brand new American Classic 420s and are supposed to be good. I'm on the bigger end at 6'4", 210lbs.,
Try another front wheel- something beefy. Borrow one for a quick spin. American Classic's not a great choice for powerful riders.

I am assuming the wheel is true, skewers are tight, brake pads have at least some clearance. Also, you may have a flexible fork, but my money on those wheels.
 

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How close are the pads to the rim ? If the brake caliper nut is tightened down, the calipers shouldn't move.
Best thing would be to have your LBS look at it.
 

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Flexy wheels

Lipton said:
The wheels are brand new American Classic 420s and are supposed to be good. I'm on the bigger end at 6'4", 210lbs., but that shouldn't matter with good wheels that are tuned properly. Any ideas about the wheel problem?
I agree with Coolhand - these are flexy wheels, and at your size and strength you are simply flexing them far enough to hit the brake pads.

When high-end wheels (like the American Classic 420) are considered "good", that generally means that they are lightweight, at least somewhat aerodynamic, but mostly are very cool looking. Unfortunately, removing weight from wheels generally makes them flexier. When you start with a 420 gram rim, and support it with 24 or fewer really thin spokes, there is no way the wheels are going to be very stiff. These wheels might be more than stiff enough for someone who is 5' 2" and 110 lb., but at your size, you'll probably want something stouter.
 

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It's also possible that your spoke tension is too low, but I imagine that the rest of the folks here are right--those wheels may not be up to the job.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks...I will check into the spoke tension, etc. Do you have any recommendations for stronger wheels that are still relatively light?

Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks Mark...do you have any recommendations for stouter wheels that are still light and don't cost a fortune? Thanks...
 

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As a fellow big rider, I have flexed my share of wheels. At your height and strength you have tremendous leverage you can put forth at will.

Go back to your LBS and try a wheel swap test ride. If they have a Mavic Kyserium front wheel or a decent quality 32 spoked front wheel try that.

You can always sell off the American Classics if they prove to be the culprit as I suspect.

I would go with a set of Ultegra 10 speed hubs, 32 hole front and rear, built 3 or 2 cross with DT Comp butted spokes built to DT RR rims (or Mavic Open Pros). Handbuilt is better, but a set of machine builts through QBP (your shop likely has an account with them) is a cheap and viable solution. For Campy go with Chorus hubs.

As a big guy you will find certain parts are not made with you in mind, but there is always a solution.

:)
 
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