Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is anyone experiencing an FSA freehub body not maintaining its integrity at the contact points with the cogs?

I am running an FSA RD-600 wheelset with a 12-27 Dura-Ace cassette and the 14, 15, and 16 tooth cogs (the stand-alone ones with the spacers between them and the narrow contact points) and it appears also the 12 and 13 cogs have ground their way about 1mm into the freehub body in the direction of the applied force. This has resulted in 1mm grooves at each contact point for the 14, 15, and 16, and apparent damage at some of the 12 and 13 contact points. The 12, 13, 14, 15, and 16 cogs are a different metal than the other cogs - maybe a chromed steel instead of the titanium of the other cogs - and all of these cogs themselves show no damage. I only have - maybe - 300 miles on these wheels and cassette.

Would appreciate anyone's observations on the situation or if other's have experienced the same.

Thanks
Andrew
 

· Registered
Joined
·
838 Posts
drewatkins said:
Is anyone experiencing an FSA freehub body not maintaining its integrity at the contact points with the cogs?

I am running an FSA RD-600 wheelset with a 12-27 Dura-Ace cassette and the 14, 15, and 16 tooth cogs (the stand-alone ones with the spacers between them and the narrow contact points) and it appears also the 12 and 13 cogs have ground their way about 1mm into the freehub body in the direction of the applied force. This has resulted in 1mm grooves at each contact point for the 14, 15, and 16, and apparent damage at some of the 12 and 13 contact points. The 12, 13, 14, 15, and 16 cogs are a different metal than the other cogs - maybe a chromed steel instead of the titanium of the other cogs - and all of these cogs themselves show no damage. I only have - maybe - 300 miles on these wheels and cassette.

Would appreciate anyone's observations on the situation or if other's have experienced the same.

Thanks
Andrew
Aluminum freehub bodies will always develop marks on them from the individual cogs of a Shimano cassette. One of the most important things is making sure you tighten the lockring down enough. I have seen many guys tell me that there aluminum freehub body was damaged and when I asked them about how tight was the lock ring, they say something like "tight enough but I didn't want to strip the threads". Most aluminum free hub bodies need at least 40nm of torque or the cogs can slowly "move" and cut into the splines.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
838 Posts
drewatkins said:
Are freehub bodies replaceable?
99% of the time they are. You need to talk to Rik H. ( I would give you his full last name but can't remember the correct spelling) at FSA and he can give you all of the info you need about your wheels.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
5,358 Posts
You can also use American Classic "cassette clips". They are small pieces of steel that slide in between the cassette and freehub (where the missing splines are). They spread the load from each of the individual cogs that only have 6 splines. They work pretty well... I have used them on a Powertap wheel I've had for a year and a half and it's freehub is still in fine shape.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top