Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have just started riding from 2 months ago. (Target is to do 75 miles per week). occasionally do 50 Miles rides. Currently have GIANT OCR3 with Sora.

Want to upgrade to Specialized roubaix but its way over budget :p:cryin:

came across these 2 options on one retailer's website and CONFUSED:confused: what to choose:

Any helpful tips from you guys would greatly appreciated.

THANK YOU AGAIN!

Product Description
Ridley Fenix CR2 105 Road Bike - 2015 Performance Exclusive
Fuji Roubaix 1.0 LE Road Bike - 2016
Price

Compare: $2,499.99
SALE:$1,399.00
Save: $1,100.99


Compare: $1,900.00

SALE:$1,049.00
Save: $851.00
Rating









Bottom BracketSRAM PF30BB86
BrakesTektro R312Tektro R540
CassetteShimano 105 11-speed, 11/28TShimano 105 5800, 11-speed, 11-28
ChainKMC X11KMC X11L
CranksetShimano 105 11-speed Compact, FC-RS500-L 50/34Oval 520, mid-compact, 52/36T chainrings
ForkFenix carbonFC-440 full carbon, tapered
Frame24-ton high mod, uni-directional carbon fiber construction, double water bottle mounts, replaceable rear derailleur hangerAluminum frame, tapered head tube, BB86
Front DerailleurShimano 105Shimano 105 5800
Grips/tape4ZAOval
Handlebar4ZAOval 310
HeadsetFSA IntegratedFSA
LeversShimano 105 11-speedShimano Ultegra 6800
PedalsNoneN/A
Rack MountsNoNo
Rating4.55
Rating_inlinepwr/7798vqxu/inline/07/55/31__2748-en_US-1-reviews.htmlpwr/7798vqxu/inline/01/88/31__4875-en_US-1-reviews.html
Rear DerailleurShimano 105 11-speedShimano Ultegra 6800
Saddle4ZA, RoadOval 300
SeatpostAlloy, 31.6x350mmOval 300
ShiftersShimano 105 11-speedShimano Ultegra 6800
Stem4ZAOval 313
TiresContinental Grand Sport Race, 700x25CVittoria Zaffiro Slick, 700x25
Wcsearch_topsellers_weight25
WheelsetAlex Race 28, ClinchersOval 327 alloy clincher

<tbody>
</tbody>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
268 Posts
My first road bike was a Ridley with alloy frame...very nice entry level bike. So I'm partial to the Ridley. Plus the Fuji seems like they just pieced a deal together with all the mis-matched components.

Not that alloy is bad, but the carbon Ridley will be a little more 'future proof' if you decide to upgrade the components.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,238 Posts
3 40km rides a week ... not necessarily what I would consider desperate need for an endurance bike. Though if you're buying a bike anyways, then why not an endurance type.

and if you're just looking at bikes brand names ... they are essentially interchangeable, not much difference. Should really consider all 30+ brands out there, look for the right fit, components and price as higher priority than brand name.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
295 Posts
Yeah, Fuji has a thing for mixing components. But between the Roubaix and the Fenix, consider any geometry differences (stack and reach and so on) and the cranksets: one is compact, the other is mid compact. If you're somewhere hilly, you might appreciate a 34-tooth little ring, for example.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,987 Posts
Isn't every bike really a Giant?


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
525 Posts
I have an older Fuji aluminum road bike, a Newest 3.0, that would not be as nice as the one you're considering. I have ridden it 25,638 miles, so far. It has old 3 x 8 Sora components and no-name brakes. No problems. I did replace the original wheels after 25,000 miles. Fuji makes a good bike, and typically they offer good bang for the buck. The Fuji was my first modern-day road bike. I've ridden a few centuries on it.

After I had the Fuji for a couple of years, I bought a Cannondale Synapse carbon. It's a nice bike and rolls well.

Currently, the Fuji is the weekday bike and the Cannondale is the weekend bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
I'd spend a little more and get the carbon Ridley; though I agree that you should check out other brands as well and don't necessarily pay attention names. I know you can find good deals online, but you should really try riding a few bikes to get a feel for how they ride. Unless you already know what you want.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,714 Posts
You are not indicating how these bikes fit you. Don't buy a bike on price or components alone; buy it on best fit first.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,792 Posts
You said you spec'd the Roubaix but have you spec'd a similarly-equipped Giant? They usually have a little more bang for the buck I've found.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
100 Posts
I would go with a Fuji but maybe an Altamira or SL. They are carbon frame and fork and either come with a mix 105 or Ultegra and Oval (Fuji's house brand parts). Every bike manufacturer does this. I think Fuji bikes are a good bang for the buck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Hi hardycool,

It looks to me like both bikes have medium-quality drivetrains and wheels. The biggest difference appears to be in the frame. As a bike-builder, myself, I always start with the frame---especially if I plan to keep the bike for a long time. The drivetrain and wheels can be upgraded later, if desired.

Frame Geometry
The most important frame consideration is its geometry. You need to know which frame fits you well.

Frame Strength
If both frames have a similarly good fit, then I would next consider how the bike will be used. Do you ride only on smooth pavement? Are you forced to ride on bad roads with lots of cracks and potholes? Do you use stunts like bunny hopping to avoid holes and jump curbs? Are you a heavy person?

Personally, I much prefer a well-made composite carbon frame and fork to every other material on the market. But most carbon frames are made to reduce weight and this makes them less strong for certain things. If they are handled gently, a carbon frame can last longer than any other. However, if you need a frame to handle more abuse and heavier weight, a metal frame will give you better short-term durability. However, the stress of an alloy aluminum frame is cumulative and it won't last as long as other metals and carbon.

------

Regarding brand: I've admired Ridley---they make some very nice frames and have a good reputation but I have no experience with them. My experience is deep with Fuji. I started riding a 1985 Fuji quad-butted steel frame (which I still have). Today I ride a 2008 Team Fuji with a full composite carbon frame and fork and a SRAM Red drivetrain. The classic Fuji road bike geometry has always been a good fit for me.

Kind regards, RoadLight
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thank you all!

Hi hardycool,

It looks to me like both bikes have medium-quality drivetrains and wheels. The biggest difference appears to be in the frame. As a bike-builder, myself, I always start with the frame---especially if I plan to keep the bike for a long time. The drivetrain and wheels can be upgraded later, if desired.

Frame Geometry
The most important frame consideration is its geometry. You need to know which frame fits you well.

Frame Strength
If both frames have a similarly good fit, then I would next consider how the bike will be used. Do you ride only on smooth pavement? Are you forced to ride on bad roads with lots of cracks and potholes? Do you use stunts like bunny hopping to avoid holes and jump curbs? Are you a heavy person?

Personally, I much prefer a well-made composite carbon frame and fork to every other material on the market. But most carbon frames are made to reduce weight and this makes them less strong for certain things. If they are handled gently, a carbon frame can last longer than any other. However, if you need a frame to handle more abuse and heavier weight, a metal frame will give you better short-term durability. However, the stress of an alloy aluminum frame is cumulative and it won't last as long as other metals and carbon.

------

Regarding brand: I've admired Ridley---they make some very nice frames and have a good reputation but I have no experience with them. My experience is deep with Fuji. I started riding a 1985 Fuji quad-butted steel frame (which I still have). Today I ride a 2008 Team Fuji with a full composite carbon frame and fork and a SRAM Red drivetrain. The classic Fuji road bike geometry has always been a good fit for me.

Kind regards, RoadLight
---------------------------------------------------
Thank you all for your helpful comments and suggestions. In conclusion if there would not be a 'big' difference in the fit, I will choose Ridley over Fuji... :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
You are not indicating how these bikes fit you. Don't buy a bike on price or components alone; buy it on best fit first.
Yeah. I found Ridley a lot different geometry than others (high stand over compared to top tube length). For me that was a non starter. Check the geometry out foremost.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top