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Awwww shizzy...can't wait. With Garmin's dominant presence in cycling computers, integrating it with an in house power meter means hopefully a competitively priced alternative to SRM or powertap.
 

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Probably a reaction to the Polar/Look product anouncement. Also a lot of people are unhappy that the Look pedal will only broadcast on Polar's proprietary protocol and not use ANT+. This is probably a good move.
 

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Given Garmin's track record with software quality on the 705 I fear this will not be a good thing. It'll get to market faster, but it's accuracy will be +/- 50%, some marketed features won't exist, and others will only work on odd days when the sun is out.
 

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Given Garmin's track record with software quality on the 705 I fear this will not be a good thing. It'll get to market faster, but it's accuracy will be +/- 50%, some marketed features won't exist, and others will only work on odd days when the sun is out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yeah-given what is happening with cell phones it is probably a good idea to branch out. I wonder what the price point will be. Snuggling under angrand will be pretty tempting--especially used and if it works. (big if)
 

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I think this could go either way. I think it would have been better if they had a product in the market first, then got aquired. They probably would have been more responsive to people already familiar with using powermeters. Some of that could have been preserved in the Garmin incarnation. Now I'm afraid that Garmin will just have their own plans and we'll get whatever they decide. It will be pretty popular and bring in a lot of people who are new to power. Then their won't be any pressure to improve the product since all the users will think it's great without knowing any better.

Also without already being in the market and all the release delays, does anyone else think this was a firesale?
 

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InfiniteLoop said:
Given Garmin's track record with software quality on the 705 I fear this will not be a good thing. It'll get to market faster, but it's accuracy will be +/- 50%, some marketed features won't exist, and others will only work on odd days when the sun is out.
Hard to guess how accurate/precise the Metrigear meter will be. If it's as bad as the Polar one from years past, it's a non starter.

Concerning the head unit: I'm assuming the meter/pedal system will be sold separately from the computers, so you can choose the 500 vs. 705, or any other ANT+ compatible unit from another mfgr. For instance Cycleops sells their Powertap computers separately, so if you didn't need GPS that could be a good option. Still much cheaper than a wireless Powertap unit.
 

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dwgranda said:
Also without already being in the market and all the release delays, does anyone else think this was a firesale?
Yep. They spent years in R&D and still have no actual sales on the horizon (anyone remember the "Q2 2010" release date?). I'm sure cash flow was a real issue.
 

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This is a good thing. Garmin has the know-how to bring hardware products to the mass market. The lack of a Garmin power sensor was a huge hole in their cycling product line. MetriGear has great ideas and solid engineering. I hope that the MetriGear founders/employees got a good deal out of this, and wish them well in their new roles. Hopefully, they don't have to relocate to Kansas either!
 

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ukbloke said:
This is a good thing. Garmin has the know-how to bring hardware products to the mass market. The lack of a Garmin power sensor was a huge hole in their cycling product line. MetriGear has great ideas and solid engineering. I hope that the MetriGear founders/employees got a good deal out of this, and wish them well in their new roles. Hopefully, they don't have to relocate to Kansas either!
I agree. Great move for Garmin!
 

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Metrigear goes from vaporware to possible product released in a reasonable timeframe.

Polar/Look can't be happy.
 

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This is chump change for Garmin, and much cheaper than trying to buy Saris, SRM or Quarq. It also fits in more with just adding a sensor to the bike rather than a more significant change such as crank-set or wheel. And then there's the possibility of extracting much more information out of the power data (eg. left versus right, force around the entire revolution of the pedal, direction of force). They also own the whole technology from power sensor, to wireless protocol, to head unit, so they can add in the extra features. They still need to do something about software/firmware competency IMHO. It also stops anyone else from entering acquiring MetriGear. It is a shame that MetriGear didn't make it to introducing their product to market though, as that would have increased their valuation substantially. I doubt that the founders will be retiring to Los Altos Hills mansions based on this.

I can see Garmin first introducing a mid-end product to compete at the PowerTap price-point (~$1000), and then a high-end product with the whizz-bang data analysis at the SRM price-point. Whether they will push this technology down to the mass market later (and whether there is a mass market for this) remains to be seen. I predict fall next year for product introduction ...
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I can see Garmin first introducing a mid-end product to compete at the PowerTap price-point (~$1000), and then a high-end product with the whizz-bang data analysis at the SRM price-point. Whether they will push this technology down to the mass market later (and whether there is a mass market for this) remains to be seen. I predict fall next year for product introduction ...[/QUOTE]

It might be wishful thinking ('cause I'd love one of these without having to buy a wheel or crankset which I ain't gonna do), but I've gotta believe that because the fitness aspect of the business is the fastest growing and the relatively high price of power meters by other manufacturers, there is a tremendous opportunity for market penetration at lower price points. It's hard to justify $1k on a power meter when a decent bicycle can be had for less -- particularly used.

If they can get the PM to the point where it's the same as a ridiculously tricked out HRM or top-end computer (Edge 800 with all the bells and whistles), they will quickly gain share against the other providers among the enthusiast crowd. From then on,we'll see the prices dropping pretty fast, at least on PTaps.

One can only dream...
 

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hrumpole said:
there is a tremendous opportunity for market penetration at lower price points. It's hard to justify $1k on a power meter when a decent bicycle can be had for less -- particularly used.
I think it remains to be seen whether there is a huge market here, compared to say the market for Edge bike computers in general. I would guess that maybe 1 in a 100 Garmin Edge users would spend non-trivial money to add power. The incumbents in the market certainly do not want a price war. They are happy with their low-volume high-margin business. Garmin can probably continue to sell at a price premium because of the "bells and whistles" that they can add. They also have to recoup development/acquisition costs. They will probably not enter at a low price point because once you have done that, it is impossible to go in the other direction.

By the way you can get a used (wired) PowerTap for around $400 these days so the price barrier for power is lower than it has ever been. There's also the iBike stuff and I see no evidence of mass adoption of power training with their $200 entry product (though it comes with its own pros and cons).
 

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I think this is great news. Metrigear didn't seem to be developing a display and so they were going to have to partner with someone anyway or only get some of the basic functions of the power meter.

And actually getting the capital to produce, market, and distribute whlie there is no cash flow was likely a daunting task.

I think this is a real positive move for the technology and bicycle riders as a whole and I am a lot more optimistic that we will see this product next year.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
ukbloke said:
I think it remains to be seen whether there is a huge market here, compared to say the market for Edge bike computers in general. I would guess that maybe 1 in a 100 Garmin Edge users would spend non-trivial money to add power. The incumbents in the market certainly do not want a price war. They are happy with their low-volume high-margin business. Garmin can probably continue to sell at a price premium because of the "bells and whistles" that they can add. They also have to recoup development/acquisition costs. They will probably not enter at a low price point because once you have done that, it is impossible to go in the other direction.

By the way you can get a used (wired) PowerTap for around $400 these days so the price barrier for power is lower than it has ever been. There's also the iBike stuff and I see no evidence of mass adoption of power training with their $200 entry product (though it comes with its own pros and cons).

All true, but neither seems as easy to use as the garmin products, which simply require pairing and leaving. Further, ibike does not have the Garmin name nor the cachet behind it. The key for Garmin is to make power as "essential" and accessible to recreational athletes as an HRM and/or GPS. If they do that, they might have a real winner on their hands, and I don't see doing that without a cheaper entry point.

In any event, we shall see...
 

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ukbloke said:
By the way you can get a used (wired) PowerTap for around $400 these days so the price barrier for power is lower than it has ever been. There's also the iBike stuff and I see no evidence of mass adoption of power training with their $200 entry product (though it comes with its own pros and cons).
Without some marketing and distribution, Metrigear was destined to be a niche product like ibike and the wheel hub systems also have draw backs not to mention wired hubs.

Guess the real question is, if there was a reasonable wireless crank based wireless power meter that you can easily isntall and move from bike to bike, and it was distributed widely, like the Garmin GPS units, would it than be a high volume sales item?

One issue I can see is compatibility with pedals. Not everyone uses pedals with hollow spindles and that might limit the market right there. Although I imagine Garmin is thinking about that right now.
 

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ukbloke said:
By the way you can get a used (wired) PowerTap for around $400 these days so the price barrier for power is lower than it has ever been. There's also the iBike stuff and I see no evidence of mass adoption of power training with their $200 entry product (though it comes with its own pros and cons).
Without some marketing and distribution, Metrigear was destined to be a niche product like ibike and the wheel hub systems also have draw backs not to mention wired hubs.

Guess the real question is, if there was a reasonable wireless crank based wireless power meter that you can easily isntall and move from bike to bike, and it was distributed widely, like the Garmin GPS units, would it than be a high volume sales item?

One issue I can see is compatibility with pedals. Not everyone uses pedals with hollow spindles and that might limit the market right there.
 
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