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A Canadian in Sweden
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Sad news today for Canadian cycling and cycling as a whole that Geneviève Jeanson, 24, has been handed a life suspension following her positive EPO test at the Tour of Toone in Pennsylvania last July, essentially ending her promising career. This was published the French Canadian newspaper La Presse today. Interestingly enough, she had always been the object of speculation, but was never actually caught. A sad day indeed for a cyclist who would have probably remained on top even if she was drug-free.

Le quotidien La Presse a révélé ce matin que la cycliste québécoise Geneviève Jeanson était suspendue Ã* vie par l'Association cycliste américaine pour avoir échoué Ã* un test antidopage Ã* l'érythropoïétine (EPO).

Le test d'urine inopiné a révélé une présence importante d'EPO lors du prologue, un contre-la-montre, du Tour de Toona en Pennsylvanie le 25 juillet dernier.

Si la suspension est aussi sévère, c'est parce que l'infraction de l'athlète de 24 ans est considérée comme une récidive en raison des antécédents Ã* son dossier. Mme Jeanson avait omis de se présenter Ã* un contrôle antidopage Ã* la fin d'une étape de la Flèche Wallonne en 2004. Une telle omission est considérée comme un échec Ã* un test antidopage et est assortie d'une suspension de deux ans dans le cas d'une première offense.

Elle avait réussi Ã* éviter la suspension de deux ans rattachée Ã* cette première infraction, mais l'omission est demeurée Ã* son dossier. Sa dernière faute est donc considérée comme une récidive. La sanction est une suspension Ã* vie.

Retraite et procédures
Reconnue coupable par l'Agence américaine antidopage (USADA) et suspendue Ã* vie, elle décide maintenant de mettre un terme Ã* sa carrière. Geneviève Jeanson clame son innocence et tentera de blanchir sa réputation.

Elle entreprend une bataille juridique avec son avocat Jean-Pierre Bertrand, pour prouver qu'elle n'a jamais pris de produits dopants. Mme Jeanson et son avocat plaideront notamment que l'athlète a un corps d'exception dont les paramètres physiologiques sont différents de la majorité de la population.

Le triathlonien belge Rutger Beke a récemment obtenu gain de cause de cette façon.

Une carrière chargée
Le parcours de Mme Jeanson est jalonné de démêlés avec les instances antidopage. En 2001, l'orthopédiste Maurice Duquette a avoué lui avoir prescrit et administré de l'EPO. Ce dernier a tenté de se rétracter par la suite, mais on lui a refusé le droit de changer son témoignage.

Mme Jeanson a ensuite été interdite de course aux Championnats du monde de Hamilton en octobre 2003 pour avoir présenté un taux d'hématocrite trop élevé avant le départ de la course. Le taux maximal accepté par l'Union cycliste internationale (UCI) pour une femme est de 47. Pierre Foglia révèle ce matin dans La Presse que l'hématocrite de Mme Jeanson était de 56 Ã* ce moment.

Un taux élevé de globules rouges facilite l'oxygénation des muscles, mais indique également que le sang est plus épais, plus visqueux. L'Union cycliste internationale (UCI) ne considère pas un hématocrite trop élevé comme un échec Ã* un test antidopage, mais interdit le départ Ã* ces coureurs pour des raisons de sécurité.

L'histoire de l'hématocrite se répète Ã* la Flèche Wallone, une étape de la Coupe du monde, en avril 2004. L'échantillon B infirme toutefois le résultat de l'échantillon A et Mme Jeanson peut prendre le départ. Sommée de se rendre au contrôle antidopage, un test d'urine, Ã* la fin de la course, elle omet de s'y présenter.

La dernière frasque de Mme Jeanson, en Pennsylvanie en juillet dernier, constitue le point final d'une carrière marquée par la controverse.
 

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wayneanneli said:
Sad news today for Canadian cycling and cycling as a whole that Geneviève Jeanson, 24, has been handed a life suspension following her positive EPO test at the Tour of Toone in Pennsylvania last July, essentially ending her promising career. This was published the French Canadian newspaper La Presse today. Interestingly enough, she had always been the object of speculation, but was never actually caught. A sad day indeed for a cyclist who would have probably remained on top even if she was drug-free.
If she had never been caught before, she would not have gotten the lifetime ban. Skipping a drug test is the same as being caught. Two strikes and you're out. She was never caught *until* she actually tested positive for EPO last year.
 

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Woofer said:
If she had never been caught before, she would not have gotten the lifetime ban. Skipping a drug test is the same as being caught. Two strikes and you're out. She was never caught *until* she actually tested positive for EPO last year.
I must have been asleep at the wheel. When was it announced she failed an EPO test at 'toona last year?
Wasn't there also the issue of the MD she worked with getting caught with her names in the books or he ratted her out or something?

This is one of those times when there was hopefully some targetted testing. I mean before the scandal with her Doc she was unbelievably superior to the other women racing. It was like she was in a league of her own by a long, long way.
 

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she's been dodgy numerous times

once with a super high H -Crit (she said altitude tent), dodging tests, not racing certain races for fear of doping control.
I think she's just been dirty her whole career.
 

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atpjunkie said:
once with a super high H -Crit (she said altitude tent), dodging tests, not racing certain races for fear of doping control.
I think she's just been dirty her whole career.
agree...this has been coming for some time now. not a shocker.
 

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She reminds me a lot of all the burnout ice skaters and tennis players who are pushed too much at an early age. She could have won without drugs, maybe not by 15 minutes, but she clearly had the genetics to win without. Considering her age at the start of her career and her talent, maybe she just didn't have the mental drive to do it the hard way but there are just as likely to be at least 1 doctor and 1 parent who should be horsewhipped.
 

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she's a big girl now

so I can't blame anyone but her. after the first few 'close calls' she should have gone clean.
my guess was she was in epo dependency. my guess is if she went off it her H-Crit would crash to the teens like Pantani's.
 

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You gotta wonder -

An athlete like Jeanson showed very much promise, then a bit more than 2 years ago (Oct. 2003, Hamilton, Ontario World Champs - I was there for my 21st birthday) - she had her first big bust.

Then the no-show at the Fleche...

Followed by so-so racing which never lived up to her previous level...

Then the Altoona incident...

- Is this just coincidence or almost the general pattern of any convicted doper? (Minus the no-show of course.)
 

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A Canadian in Sweden
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Yes, all the signs of a doper were there, no doubt about that. I guess that considering she was one of Canada's best cyclists, I'll always wonder a little how successful she would have been if she was clean. We'll never know now.
 

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I do love how everyone is jumping on that German triathelte's bandwagon by saying, "Ooh, he got off because the test was flawed, now what about meeeee???"

Shaddup, doper-scumbags. You rolled the dice and either:

a) you lost

or

b) god hates you and will send a hurricane, plague of avian flu, and a braindead woman with feeding tube legal issues to ruin your career.

I'd like to see the latter.
 

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i remember her first bust....

wayneanneli said:
I'll always wonder a little how successful she would have been if she was clean. We'll never know now.

if i'm not mistaken, and i may be, she went from winning every race she showed up for, to not being able to hang. i remember reading in velo news things to the effect of "what on earth is happening to her"? hum.....i guess you have to train harder without the use of banned substances.
 

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But see

2Fast2Furryious said:
I do love how everyone is jumping on that German triathelte's bandwagon by saying, "Ooh, he got off because the test was flawed, now what about meeeee???"

Shaddup, doper-scumbags. You rolled the dice and either:

a) you lost

or

b) god hates you and will send a hurricane, plague of avian flu, and a braindead woman with feeding tube legal issues to ruin your career.

I'd like to see the latter.
Thats the problem with WADA having flawed (and it is flawed) test it opens the door to this crap and you can never really rule out that maybe just maybe someone innocent got screwed. Not big deal you might say its worth a few innocents to catch the guilty ... unless your the one getting screwed.

That they have a flawed test that has been proven to flawed and they contiue with it is totally stupid and is doing little to really clean up the sport.
 

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atpjunkie said:
so I can't blame anyone but her. after the first few 'close calls' she should have gone clean.
my guess was she was in epo dependency. my guess is if she went off it her H-Crit would crash to the teens like Pantani's.
Damn I am tired of the Pantani story. The body does reduce endogenous production when you inject EPO over a period of time but not by anything approaching that degree. The idea that he went from 60 to 18 HCT because he was off the juice for a couple days is ridiculous because all the extra blood cells would have had to die and be eliminated from the bloodstream which is physically impossible in that time frame. Unless he got a transfusion there is also no way it could have gone back up as rapidly as the stories claimed.

Even if his own EPO production went to zero it would take at least a couple weeks for RBC to fully reflect that, and if he had pure red cell aplasia from the development of antibodies to rEPO resuming it would have only made it worse and his counts would never have come back up.

Physical dependency is just not a big deal. Mental dependency is a whole other can of worms.
 

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olds_cool said:
if i'm not mistaken, and i may be, she went from winning every race she showed up for, to not being able to hang. i remember reading in velo news things to the effect of "what on earth is happening to her"? hum.....i guess you have to train harder without the use of banned substances.
I don't think it was her bust that was the turning point. It was when her Doc got busted and named names that I remember her not being all that much afterwards. I bet that weird coach of hers was still getting the goods from Mexico or whereever and they were doing on their own, which would explain the failed hematocrit tests, skipping the doping control, and now this. Although hard to believe they would have injected a large dose right before a big race but testing may be so spotty domestically in the US, especially with the women, that they figured they were OK.
 

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32and3cross said:
Thats the problem with WADA having flawed (and it is flawed) test it opens the door to this crap..
That they have a flawed test that has been proven to flawed and they contiue with it is totally stupid and is doing little to really clean up the sport.
Depends on what you mean by flawed. Since EPO is a naturally occurring hormone there isn't going to be any "it's there or not there" type of test. But it appears that taking rhEPO does produce a difference in the EPO isoforms from normal. So some kind of criteria has to be established for a positive or they just let them continue to dope with EPO at will like they've been able to do since the mid 90's. Seems to me from what I've read that the bar is pretty high for a positive and more than likely they're not catching a lot of dopers rather than generating a bunch of false "positives". Furthermore, if you happen to be a person with abnormal EPO isoforms you can show that like the triathletes who cleared their names. It's unfortunate that variation like that exists but the alternative is to continue to allow rampant cheating, and since EPO is the one drug that really matters for endurance that probably isn't a wise decision.
 

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Dwayne Barry said:
Depends on what you mean by flawed. Since EPO is a naturally occurring hormone there isn't going to be any "it's there or not there" type of test. But it appears that taking rhEPO does produce a difference in the EPO isoforms from normal. So some kind of criteria has to be established for a positive or they just let them continue to dope with EPO at will like they've been able to do since the mid 90's. Seems to me from what I've read that the bar is pretty high for a positive and more than likely they're not catching a lot of dopers rather than generating a bunch of false "positives". Furthermore, if you happen to be a person with abnormal EPO isoforms you can show that like the triathletes who cleared their names. It's unfortunate that variation like that exists but the alternative is to continue to allow rampant cheating, and since EPO is the one drug that really matters for endurance that probably isn't a wise decision.
Right you can show it provided you have the money to do all the testing on your own dime and its not something you can do witha home chemistry kit. The test is based on flawed data - not peer reviewed - and has not established false positive rate in the real world thats not even science.
 

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32and3cross said:
Right you can show it provided you have the money to do all the testing on your own dime and its not something you can do witha home chemistry kit. The test is based on flawed data - not peer reviewed - and has not established false positive rate in the real world thats not even science.
What's your evidence that the data is flawed?

The only data I'm aware of is the paper that shows the shift in isoforms following injection of rhEPO but I'm not aware that there has been criticism that it is flawed in some way. That is the data the test is based on.

I think what you're saying is that the test criteria for a positive has not been validated, no? Or at least it's not been published (i.e peer reviewed) if it has been validated. In which case I don't think anyone can say one way or another that the test criteria is based on flawed data. You can just say the test hasn't been validated.
 

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have there been any long term studies?

as I'm only basing this on what happens to athletes, body builders who abuse other synthetic 'boosters'. mass abuse of steroids or testoserone and the body stops producing it on its own. I'm (agreed,admitted postulating) that he may have been a heavy user for years which may account for the sudden drop (along with blood loss form the crash) and yes I'm assuming he got a transfusion from his team Docs. I'm sorry but his H-Crit didn't'recover' until after his team docs took over his treatment. that sounds fishy
 

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atpjunkie said:
as I'm only basing this on what happens to athletes, body builders who abuse other synthetic 'boosters'. mass abuse of steroids or testoserone and the body stops producing it on its own. I'm (agreed,admitted postulating) that he may have been a heavy user for years which may account for the sudden drop (along with blood loss form the crash) and yes I'm assuming he got a transfusion from his team Docs. I'm sorry but his H-Crit didn't'recover' until after his team docs took over his treatment. that sounds fishy
Pantani was also a cocaine addict--that very well could mess with physical processes in the body though I'm no scientist and I don't know what effect it would have on H-crit.
 

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we have to make cycling clean for our kids

i am sorry to say... but it is good that she got caught. this is a beautiful sport that one could do for a very very very long time, but if you look at most of the people who raced, thay are finished by the time they are 22.... this is nor normal. a kid like jeanson without drugs would probaly have been a good rider... just not a great rider. a little kid getting involved in cycling... the goal should be to give him a sport that he could do for the rest of his-her life, not to make the olympics, if this happens its great, if it does not heppen it is also great. cycling is being ruined by the pressure of drugs, they are everywhere know be it at the tour de france level or at the local level, and this is a shame. the riders who get caught are not evil persons... they just got caught up in the system. this has to happen for this sickness to stop. but more riders have to get caught, lance is no better he cheated for more than seven years, he got away with it, but look at what it has done to the sport.
 
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