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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey, so I've been doing mtb for a few years now. But recently I've been riding around the town and I'm also thinking of doing some distance riding (20-40 miles), some gravel.

With being new to roads, would a flat bar road/hybrid be in to use, or should I buy a drop bar?

The two I'm considering is:
Colnago Impact - hybrid
Felt V85 - adventure

I'm thinking with the hybrid, a different set of tires should do me fine for gravel.
 

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I wouldn't buy a hybrid. If you want to ride a flat bar on the road, get slicks for your mtb.

Wrt the felt, i would not buy a bike with cable actuated disc brakes. Hydraulic discs or normal rim brakes.

Ymmv.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I wouldn't buy a hybrid. If you want to ride a flat bar on the road, get slicks for your mtb.

Wrt the felt, i would not buy a bike with cable actuated disc brakes. Hydraulic discs or normal rim brakes.

Ymmv.
What's wrong with hybrid on roads though?

The diverge is popular and is mechanical disc, that gets good reviews.
 

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You may change your mind after riding one a while. I wouldn't invest a lot of money in a hybrid before you ride one a while, there are a lot of them available second hand.
A friend had one, then went to upright trek, then race cervelo, then race tarmac. It just depends on what your target ends up being.
Riding a MUT or group rides. On a spirited group ride you may not be able to keep up.
 

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What's wrong with hybrid on roads though? They are a compromise. As such, they don't do anything well. You already have a flat bar bike. No reason to spend money on another one. Want a road bike, buy a road bike (cx, "gravel", "endurance", etc.).

The diverge is popular and is mechanical disc, that gets good reviews. Simply my opinion. You are a mountain biker. Mountain discs went through a period of transition from v-brakes to cable actuated discs to hydraulic discs. It is pretty well accepted that hydraulics are better. Why bother to pay twice. Just buy hydraulic. Or don't. It isn't my money.
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The type of bike really depends on the roads you plan to ride and what you enjoy about cycling. For me, I started on a cheap mountain bike and only cycled on the county roads. If you ride rough roads then wider tires help. As I started going longer distances (30+ miles) I bought slick tires. Soon I found what I really enjoyed about the hobby was endurance cycling. I bought a road bike and had a lot of fun going to the surrounding towns. Ended up doing 6212 miles that year. If you know that you will be doing some gravel roads then make sure you get a gravel bike which is a road bike that can run the 28mm or 32mm tires. As for drop bar, I would so yes. With a drop bar you can distribute more of your weight instead of having all of it on your seat for all of the long miles. Do be aware that road bikes are less stable then mountain bikes. I was surprised when I made the switch. Took me a couple rides before I felt safe pulling the water bottle out of the bottle cage. I wondered why they would be designed less stable and finally determined it is so you can quickly dodge the road debris when doing 25mph.
 

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Flat bars get uncomfortable after a while on the road. You don't notice that off road because you're often moving around on the bike to deal with terrain. There's much less of that on the road.

Drop bars give you multiple hand positions for a change and for different purposes- bar tops for climbing, drops for descending and into the wind on the flat, brake hoods the rest of the time.
 

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just say no to any bike with flat-bar. in fact, i'd also say no to any hybrid bike too if you have the desire to go-fast on the road at some point.
 

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What's wrong with hybrid on roads though?

The diverge is popular and is mechanical disc, that gets good reviews.
The question isn't so much with 'what's wrong with hybrids on roads' it's 'what's wrong with keeping your hands in the exact same spot and being not at all aerodynamic for 40 miles'. I think the answer is pretty obvious there.

Hybrids are great for what they are and a bike to ride long distance on isn't what they are at all.
 

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If you're riding 100% by yourself, get whatever you want. I think other folks' comments have been pretty in line, though. If you are talking about adding a lot of distance to your riding, then drop bars are great for changing positions. Even if you don't care about being aero, the ability to put your hands in several different positions is nice on a long ride.

For me, even as mostly a solo rider I've found road riding to be more social than MTB. If you end up riding with other people on long road rides, it may be near impossible to keep up without a road bike.
 

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I'd go further to say that ability to place your hands in different positions (by using drop bar) is a must if you plan on not having carpel tunnel syndrome in your wrist. I got some major wrist nerve pain when mtb'ing for a while that I had to stop for a couple months to let my wrist heal. It got to the point where even bending my wrist would cause the nerve pain. But glad I didn't get permament nerve damage!
 

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I agree with everyone suggesting a drop bar bike. And what is just as important as that is to make sure that there's clearance for high volume tires.
Room for 28mm minimum with room for 32's even better. That's with 700c wheels.
 

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I came over from mtb as well. I first started riding the mtb on the road. Then I bought a hybrid and road that on the road for two or three weeks. My neighbor asked me to help him inflate the tires on his new road bike. (Yes, I know. It was his first bike with those valves).
Anyway, he left his bike at my house over night so I took it for a ride. Two weeks later I had a road bike of my own in the garage. I sold the hybrid and converted my old mtb to a hybrid and bought a new mtb. I can't part with the 20 yr old mtb converted to hybrid because I just love it or the memory of it. I never ride it though. I will convert it back to mtb when my son gets too big for his current mtb.
Regardless, if you are planning on rides of 20-40 miles the hybrid is not going to be very pleasurable. They are typically not comfortable for that long of a ride. The drop bars really make a difference.
As sad as it sounds, I am far more roadie now than mtb.
 

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6789-ten.

All equipment makes some compromises. Cars compromise aesthetics for gas mileage, mpg for power, price for safety etc.

I think flat bar hybrids make the wrong ones for many riders - but if one doesn't ride more than an hour and most rides are MuTs or stop light to stop light in the city, they are better suited.

As far as the brakes, the only time I've ever wished for anything other than cantis on my CX bike is when I was pulling a trailer with two kids in it. I have low end hydraulic on the mtb and probably will try to get hydraulic on my next CX bike, but it's also a compromise with budget concerns.

OP- If gravel becomes part of your regular riding, I would look hard for frames and forks that fit 38 or even 40 mm tires. Is thatan absolute necessity, no but having options is a good thing.
 
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