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· pcmike
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15 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I got a new bike for Father's Day and, following the suggestions of a lot of people, ended up visiting an LBS that specializes in precision fit. It was quite an experience. It cost $200 but lasted over two hours. I can't tell you how comfortable my bike now is.
Anyway, I did a video on it (I work in the media) and thought others might like to see it. It's posted on my clydesdalefitness.com blog
 

· Cycling induced anoesis
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13,019 Posts
Whadabala said:
$200????? Do all bike shops charge this much for a fit? This makes DIY'ers like me :cryin:
No, not all bike shops charge $200. Serotta charges $350. But honestly, many shops charge less and if a bike is purchased through them will put the amount paid towards the bike.

IMO, the phrase I can't tell you how comfortable my bike now is used by the OP in his post demonstrates what a really good bike fit is worth, long term. To me, being uncomfortable and buying/ selling bikes till one happens to fit is far more costly than the $200 +/- spent.
 

· pcmike
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15 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
No... not at all... this was a really involved and elaborate test. At most, a bike shop wouldn't charge more than $50 for a fit... and many do it free when you get a new bike. And if you have some DIY skills, you can sily do most of the crucial things yourself.A
I did the full boat fit as a news story. BUT, like I said in the video, in my opinon it was worth every cent. I used to have some right leg pain after a long ride.... no more. The fit has my pedaling aligned properly. But I don't fatigue like I used to... there's no back discomfort after a long pain and my fingers and hands aren't numb after a couple hours of riding.
 

· Registered
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108 Posts
Not all cost that much. But $100-200 precision fittings are common place. Yes, it can be worth it. There are many fitting techniques and guides online for free too though. Don't follow every single one of them as gospel though, use them as guidlines. Same goes for these $$$ fitting sessions. You use them for guidelines and as you put longer hours in the saddle, after your fitness improves, following gearing changes you will need to make adjustments too.

After having my bike tuned in for the summer to be perfect, with my improved fitness and flexibility, I realized that I need to drop my handlbars progressively this spring to it current placement approximately 3 cm below where it was by the end of last season. My saddle angle also changed after doing 80-120 mi daily for 6 and a half weeks on a cross country ride to my more regular 20-40 mi several time weekly rides.

Also, as an orthopaedic surgery resident, I will say that bike fit, aside from acute trauma, is the main reason for cycling injuries. I don't like to give medical advice in forums, however, since its preventative, I will say make sure your bike fits. Besides the glorious pain of pushing your lactate threshold in your thighs and butt, IN GENERAL your joints should NOT hurt after riding if they didn't hurt before. If something changes and they do, the first thing you should think about is fit and technique (try lower resistance and higher cadence). Ok, no more medical advice. Get your bike to fit, have fun.
 
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