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Fading fast

bretromero said:
Read about this in Joe Friels book. Anyone use it or know where to get it?
It was supposed to help with hydration. Lots of chatter a couple of years ago, but not much discussion since. When people stop talking about these "great breakthroughs" you can reasonably assume that things didn't work out like everyone hoped/hyped.
 

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Used it for years in my body building days

and workss well. It forces more water into your muscles. Used more to get a pumped look, then as a way to hydrate your body. But remember a hydrated muscle is a stronger muscle.
Still used in T&F and other sports by some athletes.

If you try it, use it in small amounts. Too much will upset your stomach.
Try GNC and look for twin lab's version if they still make it.
 

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I liked it for TTs, I could hydrate better without having to piss as often. I haven't seen it on the market in years. If anyone finds it, put a link here. I used the Twinlabs stuff. I asked about it at GNC, they had never heard of it, so obviously they haven't stocked it in a good long while.
 

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It's on the UCI banned list. Some studies show it dit not really work anyhow. I tried it once and did not see any benefits. I still have some of the Twinlab stuff in my fridge! They don't make it anymore.
 

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wheel_suker said:
It's on the UCI banned list. Some studies show it dit not really work anyhow. I tried it once and did not see any benefits. I still have some of the Twinlab stuff in my fridge! They don't make it anymore.
It's not on the UCI banned list, studies show it does work, and it can be purchased in several places in it's pure form, or from E-caps in a premixed formula.

http://www.e-caps.com/za/ECP?PAGE=PRODUCT&PROD.ID=4042&OMI=10130,10047&AMI=10130

Scott
 

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wheel_suker said:
It's on the UCI banned list. Some studies show it dit not really work anyhow. I tried it once and did not see any benefits. I still have some of the Twinlab stuff in my fridge! They don't make it anymore.
So long as what you have in your fridge is straight-up glycerol (with nothing else in it), then it doesn't need to be refridgerated. Glycerol isn't refridgerated when it's used as a reagent in biology or chemistry, and those folks are much more worried about contamination and spoilage than bodybuilders.
 

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wheel_suker said:
This is were I got my info from, it states near the bottom that it was recently added to the UCI banned list.

http://www.cptips.com/glycerl.htm
http://www.uci.ch/imgArchive/Rules/The prohibited list 2006.pdf

Not there, and never has been.

In regards to the research listed on that page, just do a quick pubmed search. A lot has been done since 1998 (the last article listed on that page), most of it trying to figure out how glycerol works (accepting that it does, albiet only slightly).

Scott
 

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Glycerol

This review article says it all. May or may not help but it is a risky choice as it may cause nausea and diarhea.

J Am Diet Assoc. 1999 Feb;99(2):207-12. Related Articles, Links
Hyperhydrating with glycerol: implications for athletic performance.
Wagner DR.
Exercise and Sports Science Department, Vanguard University of Southern California, Costa Mesa 92626, USA.
Small decreases in hydration status can result in a dramatic decrement in athletic performance and greatly increase the risk of thermal injury. Because of its osmotic properties, which enable greater fluid retention than the ingestion of water alone, glycerol has been proposed as a hyperhydrating agent. In fact, glycerol is now commercially available and marketed as a sport supplement to be ingested with water or sport drinks; thus, dietitians need to be cognizant of this new addition to the sports nutrition table. The results of glycerol-induced hyperhydration research have been equivocal, most likely because of methodologic differences between studies, such as variations in the intensity of exercise, environmental conditions, and concentration or dose of glycerol administered. Although the suggested dosage of glycerol depends on body size and varies between manufacturers, 1 g/kg body weight with an additional 1.5 L fluid taken 60 to 120 minutes before competition is standard. Some test subjects reported feeling bloated or nauseated after ingesting glycerol. This review examines glycerol-induced hyperhydration research and the safety of ingesting glycerol, discusses commercial availability of glycerol, and makes recommendations for glycerol-induced hyperhydration research.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
In case anyone is interested, it is available at CVS as glycerin. This is apparenty the same chemical. It is in the skin care section. I am trying it today, I will post results tomorrow.
 
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