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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was thinking of Marin ALP bikes. Cannondale Road Warrior. Trek SU200.

Does anyone have a flat handlebar road bike?
 

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You can put flat handlebars on any number of bikes, don't just buy a bike because that particular model has flat handlebars (how's that for muddying the waters?)
 

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Just make sure that you want a flat bar bike.

As an "older" newbie, I thought the more upright position would be great. But, there's no flexibility about where to put your hands, and there are a number of great road bikes with a slightly more upright seating position...
 

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kayakado said:
You can put flat handlebars on any number of bikes, don't just buy a bike because that particular model has flat handlebars (how's that for muddying the waters?)

I can't really agree. Swapping out bars means, at a minimum new bars and shifters. For a buyer who is already penny-pinched, buying a bike with the idea that bars can or should be changed out later is just buying into a future expense that can be avoided by buying the right bike (straight or drop bars, depending on preference) in the first place.
 

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jtolleson said:
I can't really agree. Swapping out bars means, at a minimum new bars and shifters. For a buyer who is already penny-pinched, buying a bike with the idea that bars can or should be changed out later is just buying into a future expense that can be avoided by buying the right bike (straight or drop bars, depending on preference) in the first place.
Right. It can be very expensive to switch from flat to drop bars, or vice versa. I agree with buying a bike with drop bars. Just use the tops if you choose. Flat bars offer you exactly 1 sopt in which to place your hands. This can get very, tiring after even a short time. Drop bars offer about 4 different positions, if you exclude ever using the drops. The variety will not only help your hands, but will also relieve stress on your shoulders, upper arms, neck, and your back.
 

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I recently purchased a Specialized Sirrus Comp. For the most part is been great. It feels light and quick. At around $800, I think its a good bike for the money, and a good bike for a beginner (myself).

I got a flat-handlebar because I was more used to mtb's and thought an upright bike would be better for commuting in traffic around NYC ... and for those reasons, its been great.

However, on the weekends I've been doing 25+ mile rides, and on those I have begun to wish I had drops. The one hand position gets tiring, and I sometimes wish I had a more 'aggressive' (for lack of a better word) bike. I can probably see myself getting a more traditional road bike in the not too distant future.

So, my advice would be to try out both drops and flats. And depending on how they feel, and what kind of riding you think you will be doing, make you decision.

If you are committed to flats - check out the Specialized Sirrus.
 

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If you want to really see how different flat vs. drop bars would be on the exact same bike, I think there are Trek Pilot models that come with either. That would give you a nice way to try the same bike both ways to get a read on what you really want.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Hey, thanks for the advice. I didn't realize the various hand positions on a drop handlebar bike.
 

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If you try out drop bars and they're too narrow or the ramps are too steep, look at Rivendale's Nitto bars. I converted my flat bars to drop bars using their Nitto Noodle. It was expensive, but because I had to get new shifters, brake levers, stem, etc. Switching from one drop bar to another is reasonable.
 
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