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I am looking to buy some new tires (my rear vredestein fortezza is worn out at 1600 mi) and was wondering what everybody else was using (not for racing just a good tire for long rides and alot of mileage)?
 

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Downhill Juggernaut
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Since you're in the commuting forum, I'd say the Conti Top Touring 2000.
 

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I third the Top Tourings....

I heard rumor that Conti was going to stop making Top Touring tires. Does anyone know if there is any truth to that? And if so, does anyone know where I can get a good price on a dozen of them?
 

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Nashbar, 28 mm only

fishman473 said:
I third the Top Tourings....

I heard rumor that Conti was going to stop making Top Touring tires. Does anyone know if there is any truth to that? And if so, does anyone know where I can get a good price on a dozen of them?
http://www.nashbar.com/profile.cfm?...and=&sku=15708&storetype=&estoreid=&pagename=

I don't know if they are the white label or the orange label. Orange label are stiffer. I have Orange label on back and white label on front based on LBS recommendation.

Also, I was told by knowledgeable LBS that Continental recommends that the tread pattern should be reversed for the rear wheel.
 

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Downhill Juggernaut
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Cyclocross fool
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I use Michelin Axial Carbons on my commute bike. I rotate them front to rear once in a while, and my last 2 sets have gone 4400 and 4700 miles. Very few flats too, except when the goatheads have a good year.
 

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Just Riding Along
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Gatorskins are good

I had 28mm gatorskins on my touring bike. I put 2,500 miles on them and rotated them front to back. The rear is a little squared off, but they work fine and have lots of life left. I commute on a different bike and use that bike a lot less now. The Gatorskins are undergoing an aging test now.

My only flat was a pinch flat from that pothole I should have avoided.
 

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Quick question guys... Hopefully someone can help me.
I bought a B'twin Triban 3 two weeks ago, and as far as I am aware, it came with 700c x 23 tires on it.
Would I be able to put a set of 25 tires on?? And what are the advantages / disadvantages of putting thicker tires on my bike?? I'm not using it to race... Just to go on distance journeys.
 

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Wow, this thread is almost 6 years old! Talk about a necro-post.

To answer your question, 25c tires should fit on any bike. They are not "thicker" tires per say, they are wider, taller and have more volume. If the difference between two otherwise identical tires is only their size, the larger tire will be heavier, and this combined with its minusculely larger diameter it will accelerate more slowly. However, the slightly larger air volume and wheel diameter will mean that it rolls a little more smoothly. These differences may be imperceivable.

What this thread was talking about were tires that were indeed "thicker", they had more rubber in the tread, or reinforcing features (kevlar belts under the tread or reinforced sidewalls) that made them less prone to puncture and pinch flats. These tires will be further heavier and accelerate more slowly and some of them may roll more slowly due to the stiffness of their construction.

I would suggest that you ride and wear out the tires your bike came with. Then maybe shop for a 25-28c tire that is designed for the kind of riding you are doing. Unless you are riding in an area with a lot of puncture inducing debris, I would say you shouldn't go so far as to buy a true touring tire as they are heavier, stiffer and slower. There are many "sport", "enduro", "all conditions" or "protection" tires out there targeted at the kind of riding you are describing.
 
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