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I am trying to find good quality but not exorbitantly expensive platform pedals for a road bike. I tried Shimano SPD but ended that for me it was more of a deathtrap. I did end up falling with the SPD; fortunately the only injury was to my pride.

Any suggestions as to a good quality, lightweight, road platform pedals. I would prefer to keep it under US$ 100.

Thanks.
 

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Matnlely Dregaend
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No matter what pedals you get, you're going to fall over until you get used to them. It's a rite of passage.
 

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Don't give up so easily, You ever hear of try try and try again... It works, What reason will you use when you fall with platforms? I hope it's not I won't ride any longer. Look at it not as a failure but as a result. You received a result you do not like so try again and hopefully come out with a new result, if not then again dust yourself off and get another result until you can spin and unclick without falling period. DrSmile is also correct.
 

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Rivendell (rivbike.com, I think) has a good selection of platforms. As well as they should, since they are of the opinion that the positive effects of clipless pedals are vastly overrated. I tend to agree, but you do have to know (or re-learn if you've been on clipless pedals for a long time) how to safely put the power down without being connected to the pedals, especially at high cadences.
 

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I'd keep trying with the clipless pedals. BTW, if you didn't know this, you can adjust the release tension on them, so it's easier to unclip--and not fall over. Of course, it'll also make it easier to pull out inadvertently when you're ripping off one of those 40MPH sprint efforts, but you can run 'em "loose" until you get used to them.

I'm of the opinion, having grown up with "feet belts" and cleats, that the clipless pedal is one of the major advances in biking technology in my lifetime, and would never want to go back to platforms for my road bike.

Except my fixed gear; I just don't have the stones to ride clipless on that thing. Frankly, it's me; I've had the thing for about five years, and I'm still a little scared of it. I run old-skool on that.
 

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I am trying to find good quality but not exorbitantly expensive platform pedals for a road bike. I tried Shimano SPD but ended that for me it was more of a deathtrap. I did end up falling with the SPD; fortunately the only injury was to my pride.

Any suggestions as to a good quality, lightweight, road platform pedals. I would prefer to keep it under US$ 100.

Thanks.
Falling while clipped in, to many cyclists is a "Right of Passage" for clipless experience. Yes, some pride is hurt when you fall over. Yes, I have fallen while clipped in, when I was learning clipless.

Try a Shimano PD-A520 pedal, which has SPD on one side and platform on the other.
 

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My personal opinion and experience is that feet coming off the pedals when riding fast over rough terrain or bumps can be more hazardous than falling because you have difficulty clipping out when stopped. I greatly prefer the security of being clipped in, road or mtbing.

If you don't find being clipped in more efficient (clipless or toe clips and straps), it's because you haven't developed an appropriate and optimum pedaling style.
 

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I used Shimano SPD M424s when I started out with clipless--they're advertised as trail bike pedals, but offer dual-entry SPD clip-in, plus a nice-sized surround to allow you to pedal without clipping in. Adjustable as mentioned above.

My old ones are currently on my wife's bike as she's trying to get into the clipless thing. Forget what I paid, but I want to say they were around $35 give or take.

 

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Except my fixed gear; I just don't have the stones to ride clipless on that thing. Frankly, it's me; I've had the thing for about five years, and I'm still a little scared of it. I run old-skool on that.
I'm curious; when you say old-skool do you mean clips and straps, or no attachment at all?

If the latter, IMO you're doing something that is more dangerous, and that limits your ability to ride FG effectively. IME it's really important to be attached to the pedal when spinning high cadences on a fixed.

If you're using clips and straps, your fears are misplaced. When I first built up a FG about 15 years ago, I used clips and straps for a while, then put on an old pair of Looks. It is far easier to click in to the moving pedal with the clipless than to flip the pedal over and get your toe into the strap (and then tighten the strap). At least, that's been my experience.

I commute on FG bikes with clipless pedals every day. No big deal. You should try it, carefully. You may find that your fears are unfounded.

I'm of the opinion, having grown up with "feet belts" and cleats, that the clipless pedal is one of the major advances in biking technology in my lifetime
I agree. IMO the only other comparable major advance is integrated brake/shift levers. Everything else is incremental and quantitative, but those two things were really new and make a big difference.
 

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What the what???
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I'll be the contrary voice.

I see the benefits of clipless, but I personally don't ride far/fast/long enough for the pros to outweigh the cons. JMHO, YMMV, yada, yada, yada.

As for recommendations, I have three bikes... Wellgos on one (SS), VP Bear Traps on another (commuter)... MKS Lambdas on the third (weekender). They all work fine and were significanly less than $100.

I'd suggest something with an aluminum spindle/cage with sealed bearings and a relatively thin profile. VO has some nice designs.
 

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My wife rides with platforms and I've gently suggested clipless pedals, but haven't pushed her at all - the reason, even the first or occasional fall (we've all done it) could really set her back both mentally and physically. Plus, even though I really do enjoy clipless pedals and use them 99.999% of the time, I also don't believe they add a meaningful amount to a slow, recreational rider's speed or power. To me, they do make the ride more enjoyable.

All that is leading up to: I put some of the knobby/grippy BMX type pedals on her mountain bike and she really likes them. They do hold the foot over the occasional bump very well.



Lots of options and price points.

Also, power grips work very well on conventional flat pedals:



On our tandem, she uses clipless - Speedplay Frogs - because her foot was tending to bounce off the pedal going over bumps or when the shift was hard. On a tandem, it can be very dicey to get the foot back on the pedal without barking your shin. Plus, on the tandem, the way we ride it, she doesn't unclip until we're actually at the end of the ride - I unclip and hold the bike when we stop, she provides the power to get started.

The Speedplay Frogs are the simplest clipless pedals I've ever seen (I did use them for a while myself too). She had a lot of difficulty getting into the SPD's, and has no problem with the Frogs. The easiest to clip into for the inexperienced, the easiest to clip out of (no clipping actually - just a simple rotation out). If you're having difficulty with SPD and want to use clipless, try them.
 

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Falling while clipped in, to many cyclists is a "Right of Passage" for clipless experience. Yes, some pride is hurt when you fall over. Yes, I have fallen while clipped in, when I was learning clipless.

Try a Shimano PD-A520 pedal, which has SPD on one side and platform on the other.
Nope. 530’s have a platform on the other side, not 520’s.
 

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I'm curious; when you say old-skool do you mean clips and straps, or no attachment at all?

If the latter, IMO you're doing something that is more dangerous, and that limits your ability to ride FG effectively. IME it's really important to be attached to the pedal when spinning high cadences on a fixed.

If you're using clips and straps, your fears are misplaced. When I first built up a FG about 15 years ago, I used clips and straps for a while, then put on an old pair of Looks. It is far easier to click in to the moving pedal with the clipless than to flip the pedal over and get your toe into the strap (and then tighten the strap). At least, that's been my experience.

I commute on FG bikes with clipless pedals every day. No big deal. You should try it, carefully. You may find that your fears are unfounded.


I agree. IMO the only other comparable major advance is integrated brake/shift levers. Everything else is incremental and quantitative, but those two things were really new and make a big difference.

Hadn't really thought about how "old" old skool could be.

I meant clips and straps on the fixed gear, but I keep them loose ( and I can't tighten a rotating strap anyhow). When I first got it, I didn't have the clips. I ran it a few times, and didn't care for that at all, for the reason you mentioned.

I may just take your suggestion. I've never had a problem with clipless on any of my rides (it's been a long time, but I have done the "forgot they're there until it's too late" fall with clips:eek:), so it's just a mental hangup, and I need to HTFU.
 

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Matnlely Dregaend
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