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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What makes a good fit for your shifters/levers? Is it the brand (Campy or Shimano are better for small hands, etc) or is it bar shape? I have Campy Chorus but my reach to the levers is far from ideal. I don't have particularly large hands. Have to wrestle with the levers a bit.
 

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setup..

Some bar bends are just not suited to Campy ergo levers. I always place the portion of the brake hood where the palms rest, horizontal at the minimum , or angled up a few degrees. There is a very narrow window, where too much upward angle causes the brake lever to swing away from the hook and increase the reach.

If I can't get the angle of an anatomic bar's hook section set to a comfortable angle with the necessary brake hood angle, then the bars are a reject. If the section of bar between the horizontal top and the brake hood can't be adjusted to only a slight downward angle, the bars are a reject.

Even with the best bar shape, my fingers are so short that I still need less reach to feel comfortable on a mountain descent. I have a fairly simple method of placing epoxy putty behind the brake lever release pin, to keep the brake lever from reaching it's normal stop position. I can reduce the reach by 10-15mm quite easily.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Memory

C-40,
Y'know, I think I remember you explaining your epoxy trick a couple of years ago on this forum. I may try to look it up.


C-40 said:
Some bar bends are just not suited to Campy ergo levers. I always place the portion of the brake hood where the palms rest, horizontal at the minimum , or angled up a few degrees. There is a very narrow window, where too much upward angle causes the brake lever to swing away from the hook and increase the reach.

If I can't get the angle of an anatomic bar's hook section set to a comfortable angle with the necessary brake hood angle, then the bars are a reject. If the section of bar between the horizontal top and the brake hood can't be adjusted to only a slight downward angle, the bars are a reject.

Even with the best bar shape, my fingers are so short that I still need less reach to feel comfortable on a mountain descent. I have a fairly simple method of placing epoxy putty behind the brake lever release pin, to keep the brake lever from reaching it's normal stop position. I can reduce the reach by 10-15mm quite easily.
 

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Try a shorter stem and look at the rise. You can also find tune the Campy shifters by a slight tilt of the bars. I had problem with my new bike with the reach. I had to take off the zoot high dollar carbon stem and replace it with a shorter less-zoot aluminum one and the difference is unbelievable.

I try to position my bars so the flat part behind the Campy levers is level. The bars on my bikes have the same drop and reach. A one cm in stem length is a big difference. But you have to factor in the rise also. A shorter stem with a higher rise, will bring you in shorter and higher. It's more about your anatomy and making your bike fit.

If you look at photos of the pro's, you will see a lot of different bar positions...
 

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KarlW said:
What makes a good fit for your shifters/levers? Is it the brand (Campy or Shimano are better for small hands, etc) or is it bar shape? I have Campy Chorus but my reach to the levers is far from ideal. I don't have particularly large hands. Have to wrestle with the levers a bit.
Shimano makes an adjustable-reach shifter designed for small hands (R700). It think they just use a variation of C-40's trick though, with interchangeable shims.
 

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the process...

KarlW said:
C-40,
Y'know, I think I remember you explaining your epoxy trick a couple of years ago on this forum. I may try to look it up.
I've changed from using 5-minute epoxy glue to Loctite 5-minute epoxy putty. It's a lot easier to work with a product that can be shpaed like modeling clay and it take a very small amount to do the job. The putty is also harder and won't compress over time.
 

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Metaluna said:
Shimano makes an adjustable-reach shifter designed for small hands (R700). It think they just use a variation of C-40's trick though, with interchangeable shims.
Those levers were made specifically with a shorter reach whether you are on the hoods or on the drops. I'll have to check out my buddy's wife's bike to see if they are reach adjustable via setscrew or not. I know that Specialized makes shims to make the reach even shorter from the drops.
 

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KarlW said:
What makes a good fit for your shifters/levers? Is it the brand (Campy or Shimano are better for small hands, etc) or is it bar shape? I have Campy Chorus but my reach to the levers is far from ideal. I don't have particularly large hands. Have to wrestle with the levers a bit.
I inserted adhesive backed felt furniture glide material between the lever and the stop 4 years ago and it works great to reduce the reach and keep the lever quiet. It is likely about 3/32" thick when compressed. Very fast, cheap, and durable.
 
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