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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have always taken my wheels into the shop or trued them using the brake pads on the bike. Now that I live in Nor Cal, I find I need to true my wheels much more often so I am thinking of getting a truing stand. What is a good one to get?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
What about middle line or high end? I want something that is relatively easy to use. I am looking for value, not cheap.
 

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Well, there's always the Park TS-2 if the TS-8 is too low rent for you. I have a TS-2 that I bought used many years ago, it is solid as a tank.
 

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I use a Spin Doctor

SilverStar said:
The one AZ linked to is the economy standard unless you're prepared to drop big bucks on the shop-grade Park model.

There is also a Minoura stand that gets decent reviews:
http://www.amazon.com/Minoura-True-...e=UTF8&s=sporting-goods&qid=1283121729&sr=1-1
I use a Spin Doctor (same as Minoura). I've had it for several years. I use it to true wheels, never have built a wheel. Works o.k.

The Park PR 2 is excellent (never owned one) shop standard. The PR 2 goes for $200+, the Spin Doctor is around $70.00. I use my Spin Doctor a couple times a year. Works for me.
 

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The industry standard is the Park TS-2. Practically every shop uses it. You can get every single part on it as a replacement if you ever need it. Except for tiny upgrades (for which you can buy the replacement parts for your current TS-2) it hasn't changed in 20 years. Get it with the tilting stand which includes some little cups for your spoke nipples and related hardware. It's worth it. Once you have it, you use it all the time. And you'll never need to replace it.
 

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Maximus_XXIV said:
I have always taken my wheels into the shop or trued them using the brake pads on the bike. Now that I live in Nor Cal, I find I need to true my wheels much more often so I am thinking of getting a truing stand. What is a good one to get?
http://forums.roadbikereview.com/showthread.php?t=177166

More or less. Done right, can be better than anything that can be had commercially.

I've seen a similar thing online that had a clever way to define center to make things a bit easier, but it wouldn't reveal itself within my attention span.
 

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Maximus_XXIV said:
I have always taken my wheels into the shop or trued them using the brake pads on the bike. Now that I live in Nor Cal, I find I need to true my wheels much more often so I am thinking of getting a truing stand. What is a good one to get?
Wheels with sufficient tension, uniform tension, and no spoke windup do not go out of true until you bend the rim at which point a new rim is usually the best fix (you can keep the spokes and hub). I didn't touch my Mavic Reflex (clincher) front for over 10 years until I bent it on something commuting and needed to replace it.

If you want to stop messing with your wheels and just ride, you'd do well to get a tension meter with Park selling the only affordable one I'm aware of (under $50 on-line). With enough spokes and shallow rims you can tension to the rims elastic limit (the rim deforms in waves when you stress-relieve) but deep sections and few spokes are popular.

Throw a piece of tape on one example of each spoke (front, drive side rear, non-drive side rear) to see how much windup you need to undo.

Stress relieve so you don't break spokes due to fatigue from residual stresses in the elbows.

True, make tension uniform, and increase to the manufacturer's recommended tension (some rims are not tolerant of over-tensioning).

A dish stick makes handling rear wheels easier (with different tension in the two sides you're probably going to get some movement to one side).

As far as truing stands, the Park TS2 is very nice but pricey. For less money the Minora is serviceable and self-centering but a bit light - I've had mine for over a decade.
 

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Minoura

I used to have a nicely machined truing stand from the mid-70's, made in the USA and fitted with dial gauges for horizontal and vertical. It got lost in a house move in the early 1990's. Ended up with a Minoura. After a couple of overseas moves, I bought another in my current location. It's fine but if you're building up wheels, it needs a dishing tool. I bought a Minoura as well as it's cheap and functional. Park makes some great stands and at the top, one's that don't need a dishing tool. Some people just take an old fork and use that which is fine. Depends on what you're looking for. If it's just truing, I'd go cheap. If you're building, the Minoura's cheap and functional with the caveat about the dishing tool.

Maximus_XXIV said:
I have always taken my wheels into the shop or trued them using the brake pads on the bike. Now that I live in Nor Cal, I find I need to true my wheels much more often so I am thinking of getting a truing stand. What is a good one to get?
 

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Bought (actually a gift) the Park TS-2 15 years ago.
Works today like it is new.
Only truing stand I have ever used and will more than likely ever own.
I have mine bolted to a piece of 1 1/2" thick mahogany slab. Sure is pretty.
 

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I have a TS-2 I bought when i worked at a shop (ie heavily discounted). The TS-2 calipers are supposed to self center so you don't need to use a dish tool, but they never seem to work exactly right so I use a dish tool anyway when building wheels from scratch. If I lost it and had to buy another, not sure I'd spend that much on a new stand. The Minora looks like it'd cover the basics...actually looks a lot like the TS2, just with a whole lot more plastic. The TS2 is build like a tank...all chrome steel.
 

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The TS-2 doesn't self-center consistently. Even Park recommends that you dish the wheel using a dishing tool.

I got a TS-3 a few years ago and just sold my TS-2. I don't miss it.
 
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