Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
93 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I've been doing MTB for 2 years now and decided to get a road bike for longer rides/when the trails are wet/when I want to ride from home and not transport my MTB to the trails. The other issue I have is that I also race cars (not professionally) and my sports car doesn't have a bike mount so at least if I take that car out for a few days, I can still ride the road bike on the road, and not be stuck not being able to take the MTB to the trails.

I looked at a few different things, but settled on a 2014 leftover Fuji GranFondo 2.5 Carbon. This bike had most of the stuff I wanted, Shimano 105 gear, besides the cassette, chain, and crank. I heard the Oval 520 crank is durable, a chain is largely a chain, and the 11 speed 105 cassette would need some wheel work to fit, so I'm leaving those things alone. I do however need shorter reach handlebars or stem since the ones on there put me in a more hunched over positon than I'd like. When compared to my friend's bars on his Nishiki maricopa, the difference was huge, same size frame. He got on my bike and said the same thing about being stretched out. Maybe this is part of that endurance/race geometry, but it's certainly a little more comfortable today than yesterday when I got the bike. Still, we had to move the saddle forward more, so I think shorter reach bars are what I need. I tried a friend's different brand bike in the same frame size with short reach bars and they felt right at home, perhaps someone can recommend me a shorter reach drop bar that won't break the bank? I think the factory one is 83mm reach and a 100mm stem. Just placing my hands where they want to go it looks like I need to lose ~30mm up front, whether that's just the bar or stem or a combo of both.

Loving this thing so far. Climbs hills great, descends great, stable. Not sure if there are any obvious things I should upgrade right away, but I'll likely be doing that as things break or wear out.

Specs on the bike: Print Bike Page - Gran Fondo 2.5

MSRP was $1949, they cut me a deal at $1375 with a full warranty. I bought my 2015 TREK FUEL EX9 used since I saved $2500 from retail doing so, but felt the warranty was good to have on this bike, and still felt like the pricing was right.

Any tips? Experiences? Share away!

Tire Wheel Mode of transport Bicycle wheel rim Bicycle tire
 

·
Neophyte
Joined
·
2,190 Posts
Enjoy! Don't be too surprised if you suddenly ride a lot more road than MTB, it's just so easy to head right out the front door and be on your ride...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
93 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Enjoy! Don't be too surprised if you suddenly ride a lot more road than MTB, it's just so easy to head right out the front door and be on your ride...
That was kind of the idea, and I am expecting to put more miles on the road bike than on the MTB. Part of the reason I got it was to increase my endurance for the MTB riding, and as easy and accesible as road riding is, the MTB trails by me are decent, and it's just a whole different kind of riding. I certainly look forward to doing both. The difference between a fully suspended (especially that reactiv rear shock) Aluminum 29er with 2.3 tires running sub 20psi and a Ridgid Carbon road bike running over 100psi is ridiculous. I just got the Fuji yesterday and the first few miles were tooth-jarring, but I've slowly accustomed to it after putting 20 more miles on today. The MTB is currently in the shop till end of the week, so once I hop on that Tuesday night for a trail ride, I expect it will feel like riding on a pillow. I recently rode with a guy who does 20+ mile rides on trails and I just couldn't keep up or keep my lungs going. That is the end goal though, to be able to ride long distances on road, and distances on trail that right now seem impossible.

I will say after riding on road roads today, it's amazing at how drivers react to you. They seem to either give you all the room in the world, or get close enough to where I can smell their cologne. One guy was following me for a good 1/4 mile afraid to pass, so eventually I just jumped off the road because I felt bad and let everyone through.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
93 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
One more thing. For full carbon steerer tubes, maybe it's different. Right now there are 2 spacers under the stem and 1 above it. I was looking to move the stem up to the top and put all the spacers under it to give me a more relaxed position but the shop recommended not to do it. Do carbon tubes need some kind of "relief" space? Looking at fujis site, their stems seem to be up top and all spacers below.
 

·
Neophyte
Joined
·
2,190 Posts
Way more knowledgeable mechanics on here than me, so hopefully somebody will give you a better answer, but:

-In general you do want at least one spacer above the stem.

-When messing with carbon steerer tube be careful, use torque wrench. I've had a shop munch one on a bike before and not own up to it, leading to needing a new fork.

-Shop may also be thinking since you are already on a endurance frame, you'll soon get more comfortable in a lower position and shouldn't adjust too much?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
462 Posts
Common practice these days to run a spacer on top. I've done without it in the past without a problem. As far as your 100 plus psi in your tires you may want to play with that. I don't know what size tires you have or your weight but I'm over 200 and run 90 to 95 in my 700x26.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
93 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
According to some app, I should be running 105 front and 110 rear. I did drop the pressures a bit and it got a little more comfy.

So let me ask you guys, this thing has a 105 group besides the crank and cassette. I did drop the chain once flying at 40mph yesterday when I hit a little bump, but otherwise it's OK. Would it be worth it to spend around $100 on a 105 crankset compared to the Oval Concepts 520?

As far as changing from Tiagra to 105 cassette, the LBS said it might require re-dishing the wheel or something like that since I'd be going from a 10 to 11 speed. Worth the effort?
 

·
Banned Sock Puppet
Joined
·
14,442 Posts
The best app you can have is the one you sit on. Ignore all others. Trust me - with the correct width tires, 90psi is all you will need. Your "app" will thank you.
Mike is right. But you have to start somewhere, like here:

Bicycle tire pressure calculator

Use the 2nd box and enter your total weight (you, bike and anything you are carrying) and your tire widths. Then experiment and adjust down for comfort or up if you are getting pinch flats. You don't need anywhere near as much pressure in the front as in the rear.

Right now, I am running 65 front, 95 rear and it is comfort heaven!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
472 Posts
As far as changing from Tiagra to 105 cassette, the LBS said it might require re-dishing the wheel or something like that since I'd be going from a 10 to 11 speed. Worth the effort?
If you're shop couldn't answer this question, you might need to find a new shop. You're bike is 10sp. Ignoring the rear wheel completely for now, to put an 11sp cassette on means... new shifters, both derailleurs, chain AND cassette. You can't just put an 11sp cassette on and expect it to work. Back to the wheel, you'll have to find out if the freehub body is even 11sp compatible. If not, then your dealer 'might' be able to get on from Fuji, if Fuji even has one available. At that point, re-dishing may or may not be needed, but that's a piece of cake if compared to everything else mentioned above.

If you really want an higher end cassette than the equipped Tiagra, why not just buy one in a 10 speed version instead?
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top