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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
View attachment 280114 I started a couple of threads a few weeks ago when this Sannino frame and fork came into my possession. This frame is in pretty good shape - the chrome cleaned up to nearly perfect condition. The paint is a little nicked up, but the touchups are invisible from 5 feet away. Some of the decals were pretty beat up and I replaced them with aftermarket facsimiles - not perfect reproductions, but OK for now since it isn't a restoration. All in all, it's a frame/fork that I'm proud to ride - it looks very nice.

The build was strictly with parts on hand. Not even a small attempt at keeping it period correct or anything like that. Apparently the seat tube angle is quite steep (I've read 75 degrees?) which I figured out when I had to put my saddle what is probably a little too far back on it's rails to get my position correct over the pedals. I've ordered a seat post with a little more setback from Velo Orange. Other than that it fits OK. The stem could be a little too long, but I'll decide that after getting the new seat post and riding it a few times.

I'm sharing wheels with my main road bike and am friction shifting a 10 speed cassette! It took about 10 shifts for me to get back into friction shifting again - I hadn't used them since I went from my 70s Raleigh Super Course to a crummy, but more modern bike with SIS 6 speed in about '95. But had a good 20+ years on friction at that point - it's just like they say about riding a bike - comes right back after about 10 minutes of riding. I'm not having any difficulty at this point shifting the 10 speed cassette. Just takes a light touch. I have a good 9 speed cassette I can use if the 10 speed is just too touchy. Again, we'll see. I'm going to give this whole set up a month before I start thinking about changing or buying parts. I kind of enjoy having a semi-retro downtube shifting bike, but kind of plan to get some integrated brake/shifters. They truly have advantages over downtube in more ways than one - shifting being one, hood shape/size being another. I don't know if I want to trust my bike handling skills with downtube shifters in a group ride.

The build (I had all this stuff except the Italian BB and the headset):

  • Ultegra 6500 (9 speed) series triple crank, bottom bracket, front derailleur and brakes.
  • Dura ace medium cage rear derailleur, 7500 series, if I'm not mistaken
  • Dia Compe Gran Compe retro style ratcheting, non-indexed shifters
  • Sram 1091 chain (spare chain from my other road bike)
  • Deda 215 Shallow bars (26.0)
  • Specialized 105mm stem
  • Unknown Tektro "aero" brake levers
  • No-name seat post which shined up very nicely!
  • E3 form saddle (my last "spare" - I stocked up on them via ebay when they quit making them!)
  • Velo Orange cartridge bearing headset
  • Reynolds Alta Race wheels
  • Deda foam handlebar tape, used and cleaned up. I keep decent used tape for new builds when I might be removing it to tweak fit. This red looks pretty good, but even though I'm not a white handlebar tape fan, this bike kind of calls out for it. Italian flag green would look OK too, no?
  • Wellgo MG8 one sided SPD compatible pedals. I actually like these pedals, but will probably get another set of Time RXS so I can use my road shoes with this bike. Or maybe I'll switch the whole stable over to SPD and be done with it.

Every thing works perfectly, the bike is fun to ride! The only problem I had was that on the first ride, I was using my boutique, lightweight quick releases and the rear wheel kept slipping in the horizontal drop outs. I switched today to some, probably totally low end, Shimano QR's I took off a bike sometime in the past, and the wheel was rock solid in the dropouts.

Right now it's dead easy to share wheels with my other bike since the Sannino doesn't have indexing - there's nothing to adjust when I put the wheel on it, other than to just verify the limits haven't moved. But since it appears this bike is working out, it's probably an excuse to buy some new wheels... maybe low profile silver rims to look good on this bike.

Thanks for all the advice. Building up a 30 year old frame is not hard at all, it's just that some of the things weren't in my current bag of tricks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That's a good looking bike, enjoy it.

How's it handle?
Yea, seems pretty "quick"! I just rode an easy, flat 10 miles by myself, but it did strike me as I made the first sharp turn at speed, that it turned right now. Definitely more like I remember my old CAAD7 frame turning, in comparison with my Felt Z.

Oh, by the way, about 20.5 pounds as pictured (without the frame pump I'll be putting on it... also sitting in the garage!)
 

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Looks good. I dig that color.
 

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outstanding. I'd love to know the exact geometry. My guess: it's a "climbers" frame. Very short chainstays, steep STA, and a relatively stable, mellow HTA. Great slow speed stability, and you could ride a thin painted line forever, without effort.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Here's some data I have (below). The more I ride this bike, the more fun it is. I'm still messing with stems and bars and now have a contingency plan to move it from a conglomeration of a Shimano triple set up I have to a set up with more Italian flavor. More details and pics to follow in a month or so!

Definitely different than my other bikes. Quick handling - and you're right, it just feels good climbing. I'm not a monster climber, but I need to do a lot of it and do enjoy it and enjoy a bike set up and geared for it. The balance standing up is definitely different than my other two bikes, and it's very responsive. I think I've only gone about 35 mph downhill so far, and dead steady.

I found a link to a guy who had archived Sannino brochures/catalogs from this era bulgier.net - /pics/bike/Catalogs/sannino/. It reinforced my opinion that the road bikes were all the same frame and differed only based on groups. In feeling the inside of the tubes, I am wondering if the tubing is really SLX, but since every model states SL, that's what it is, to me. And a fine frame it is.

My bike is stamped "56" on the bottom bracket, but it's really like what I'd call a 54. It probably relates to their method of measuring seat tube. But the frame fits me fine with just some little tweaks compared to my other bikes, and I'm a very standard "54-55" bike size kind of guy.

I was a little obsessed with this because I wanted to know if I could reasonably mimic the fit on my two other road bikes. Turns out I can with just a couple of do-able tweaks.

Here's the stats for this frame:
Tubing - Columbus SL
ST c-c: 54.0 (I measured)
TT c-c: 54.0 (I measured)
Chainstay: 40.3 cm (catalog)
STA: 75 deg. (catalog - interesting to find that my Z is 74; I thought it was slacker, but it makes mimicking the fit easier)
HTA: 75 deg. (catalog)
HT Length: didn't write this one down for some reason, but I believe it's around 110-115mm.
Fork Rake: 5 cm (probably - estimated based on catalog info)
Wheel base 98cm (guestimate based on the catalog .... it definitely handles like my old Cannondale CAAD7 (97.5), not my Z (1002).. haven't measured it)
BB Height: 26.6 cm (catalog)
 
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