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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have a Joe Blow pump that is on its third leaking gauge assembly and I am moving on. I currently run a tubeless setup on wide rims (28mm tires) and I see this always being the case, maybe even 30s on the next bike. I also have a city bike with child seat on wider tires that also takes a lower pressure. On my road setup I inflate to 5.5bar (80PSI) and the city bike is around 60PSI.

I considered portable electric infiltrators but was off put by the nose, subpar chucks/heads, short cords and needing it charged. These seemed like they would fit best as all I ever do is top up my TL setup that loses PSI with each day it sits.

I considered a hi pressure floor pump but was reminded how small the usable PSI range is on a gauge that covers 0-130 PSI. I run 75/80PSI on my setup and gone are the days of pumping skinny rubber to 90-110psi.

I settled on a "mid-volume gravel pump" a Lezyne pump (Gravel Pro) that inflates up to 100PSI. The pump is still in transit and thus I have no initial impressions. The purchase wasn't knee jerk but I'm still thinking it over.

It occurred to me after purchase that while there is a greater usable PSI range on this pump, and it should be easier to see the exact PSI, the top shelf model has a digital gauge (crickets). It should be just as easy to hit desired PSI with any other digital gauge equipped floor pump, correct?

That only leaves the increased stroke volume as a plus over higher PSI pumps.

I enjoy paying someone else to seat TL tires and is one of the few things I go to an LBS for. 100PSI should be enough to inflate a air can to seat tires. Comments thoughts?

If you have a digital display on your pump, is this a love hate relationship? How so?
 

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It occurred to me after purchase that while there is a greater usable PSI range on this pump, and it should be easier to see the exact PSI, the top shelf model has a digital gauge (crickets). It should be just as easy to hit desired PSI with any other digital gauge equipped floor pump, correct?
True, gauges with smaller ranges are 'generally' easier to read. It also depends on the quality of the printing on the gauge. I don't find that Lezyne easy to read. The gauge diameter is small as are the numbers. (My eyes hate pumps with gauges on the ground)
The digital looks like it'd be much easier to read. Both say they are accurate to 0.5 psi.





I enjoy paying someone else to seat TL tires and is one of the few things I go to an LBS for. 100PSI should be enough to inflate a air can to seat tires. Comments thoughts?
Seating tires is more about volume than pressure. A high pressure low volume pump will never seat a tubeless.
I can use an air tank to seat a tubeless tire with just 20-30psi.

I have one of these, modified with a valve and presta chuck. You can fill it up at a service station or a buddy with a compressor. Or use your floor pump and a bit of time. Filled to 100psi, it'll seat probably a dozen tires.
 

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You don't need exact. If you think you do, get a digital. I can generally use my Topeak or the other pump and get the desired 70-80 for road tires, or 30-40 for gravel and get close enough for government work. I only pull out the digital when I want a specific 17 on my tubeless HT.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
You don't need exact. If you think you do, get a digital. I can generally use my Topeak or the other pump and get the desired 70-80 for road tires, or 30-40 for gravel and get close enough for government work. I only pull out the digital when I want a specific 17 on my tubeless HT.
You're right. In this case the top spec'd pump model wit a digital gauge also gets an all alu base and wooden handle, all for $20 more.

I look forward to the new pump.
 

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Ever wonder how long it takes to fill a 5 gallon air tank to 110 lbs?
I'm thinking quite a while, then your going to put it in your garage to sit for months? ...from harbor freight? ... OMG.
 

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Ever wonder how long it takes to fill a 5 gallon air tank to 110 lbs?
I'm thinking quite a while, then your going to put it in your garage to sit for months? ...from harbor freight? ... OMG.
As I said...you don't need 100psi to seat a tire. 20 or 30 will do.
You're really over thinking this. I never said store it for months.
Fill it before you use it at a gas station.
You can get them anywhere. Hone Depot. Lowe's.
It's an air tank. Not a rocket ship. It'll hold air for weeks.
But that's not the point. The point is you can seat your tires without having a bike shop do it and you don't need an air compressor.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Get one of these:

I did think about something like this, but I don't seat enough tires to want to look/deal with the tire sealing can thing every time I pump. Plus, I wanted a better chuck than the plastic lever employed by so many pumps. Not sure if better, but want to experiment with some speed press fit chucks.

I like how the PSI display is higher on this pump.... but then again, my little person knocked over my Bont pump and that's how the gauge sprung a leak.
 

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Ever wonder how long it takes to fill a 5 gallon air tank to 110 lbs?
I'm thinking quite a while, then your going to put it in your garage to sit for months? ...from harbor freight? ... OMG.
I picked up one of these a few months ago:


I've never timed it but it I'd say it takes about 5 minutes to fill up and about the same to drain it. I never leave it filled up between uses.

I also got one of these to use with the air tank:

 

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So responding to the OP title.

I went thru this same pump dilemma awhile back. I ended up with a Joe Blow Sport II. SFSG. (OP had poor results). I think it’s up to v. III lately. Why? Replaceable parts. 0-160 psi. I do periodic pump maintenance which helps extend life of the pump. Now that’s geeky.

Gauges. Tire experts will tell us pressure changes ever so slightly with temp and altitude changes using air. To be extra geeky, inflate with nitrogen like they do at the airlines or Costco. (Good luck with that).
IMO. Better gauges are stupid expensive. I have both analog and digital. Round and stick. Got a good digital one, that RVers love at Northern Tool. TireMinder brand. Works great on bikes too. Know some old timer mechs that swear by stick gauges.

TL. I have a really old pancake compressor. Does the job.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
So responding to the OP title.

I went thru this same pump dilemma awhile back. I ended up with a Joe Blow Sport II. SFSG. (OP had poor results). I think it’s up to v. III lately. Why? Replaceable parts. 0-160 psi. I do periodic pump maintenance which helps extend life of the pump. Now that’s geeky.
Thanks for the response.

The Joe Blow started leaking by the gauge assembly, twice now. Each time I have to buy the gauge assembly and pay the attendant shipping. This adds up and I've decided not to do it for a third time.

The Lezyne arrives Thursday. Stoked for it in a bike geek way. I also ordered different chucks for it. It comes with a screw on type chuck but I'd rather a press fit, slip on presta chuck for topping off around 80PSI.


 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
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and yet the Interwebz are filled with Lezyne is crap posts. I had to really push past that when I ordered this Lezyne Gravel pump.
Interesting. For me, I love the screw on chuck. And the pump seems more solid than anything I've ever owned. But to be fair, I've only had it two years and only bother to pump my tires once a week.
 

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I considered a hi pressure floor pump but was reminded how small the usable PSI range is on a gauge that covers 0-130 PSI. I run 75/80PSI on my setup and gone are the days of pumping skinny rubber to 90-110psi.
You are worrying way too much about gauge accuracy, because your tires really don't care about the difference of a few PSI. As long as you can read the gauge and get to about the same pressure every time, you're good. Knowing the pressure is relatively meaningless because you should experiment "up or down" to find what works for you.

Regards the tank you can fill up at a gas station to help you seat tubeless tires, you can obviously fill that with your pump as well. That seems a much simpler solution. And needing such a tank is just one more reason many of us have not converted to tubeless for road riding.
 

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You are worrying way too much about gauge accuracy, because your tires really don't care about the difference of a few PSI. As long as you can read the gauge and get to about the same pressure every time, you're good. Knowing the pressure is relatively meaningless because you should experiment "up or down" to find what works for you.
^^^ This.

If 80psi actually reads '82psi' on your gauge, and the ride/handling is what you like, then you just pump your tires to 82psi every time.
 

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I have tubeless rims on my gravel/road bikes. I run tubes though. I just put a light coat of vasoline on the bead before inflating. Another thing is one has to have all the rim tape removed from the area the bead goes over. There can be no rim tape on that ledge. I get them to set at about 60-70 lbs. I usually run less in both, with 28's I run 60-65 on the road & with 45's 30-35 on gravel.
 

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I did think about something like this, but I don't seat enough tires to want to look/deal with the tire sealing can thing every time I pump.
Fortunately, you don't have to. It is currently my only floor pump, and I just leave the levers set to bypass the can thing. (In fact, last two Rene Herse tires I seated didn't even need the can. Trick was putting a tube in first.) My kid took our digital Lezyne one to college.

Plus, I wanted a better chuck than the plastic lever employed by so many pumps. Not sure if better, but want to experiment with some speed press fit chucks.
I prefer the Lezyne screw-on, but you have to make sure your valve cores are in there tight, or you get a little surprise. Having said that, the Bontrager chuck is really solid. My only complaint is it whacks my fingers if I am not paying attention when I take it off. The spring action is very strong.

I like how the PSI display is higher on this pump.... but then again, my little person knocked over my Bont pump and that's how the gauge sprung a leak.
My little person is taller than me now, but he just breaks more expensive stuff now. My one quibble with this digital display is it is upside down relative to how I use the pump. There might be a setting to rotate the display, but I haven't found it.
 

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I have a Joe Blow Mountain pump JOEBLOW® MOUNTAIN and a Joe Blow Pro. Had a gage problem with the Pro pump once. The mountain pump is great for mountain and gravel bike tires. I like that I can get replacement parts for these pumps and Todson has good customer service. Buy a Bontrager or Specialized pump, good luck with getting service parts.
 

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My old Silca pumps gage is down on the base where I can't read it, so I just put an index mark on it with a sharpie. I pump the rear tire to the high side of the mark and the front tire to the low side of the pump and all's good. The lens is loose so I can just set the index mark at the desired range, depending on tire/wheel set.

I've got a Bicycle Gauges Archives - Accu-Gage by G.H. Meiser (ghmeiser.com) for when I want to get fussy. In fact, a stand alone air gage is probably a good thing to have if using more than one pump to inflate tires. Compare the pressure readings of the pumps to that of the gage and find the point spread for the pressure you want. 1 pump may read 50, the other 75 and the gage 60 for the same pressure. No sense pumping to the same reading on both pumps when they're wildly different pressures.
 
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