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It occurred to me after purchase that while there is a greater usable PSI range on this pump, and it should be easier to see the exact PSI, the top shelf model has a digital gauge (crickets). It should be just as easy to hit desired PSI with any other digital gauge equipped floor pump, correct?
True, gauges with smaller ranges are 'generally' easier to read. It also depends on the quality of the printing on the gauge. I don't find that Lezyne easy to read. The gauge diameter is small as are the numbers. (My eyes hate pumps with gauges on the ground)
The digital looks like it'd be much easier to read. Both say they are accurate to 0.5 psi.





I enjoy paying someone else to seat TL tires and is one of the few things I go to an LBS for. 100PSI should be enough to inflate a air can to seat tires. Comments thoughts?
Seating tires is more about volume than pressure. A high pressure low volume pump will never seat a tubeless.
I can use an air tank to seat a tubeless tire with just 20-30psi.

I have one of these, modified with a valve and presta chuck. You can fill it up at a service station or a buddy with a compressor. Or use your floor pump and a bit of time. Filled to 100psi, it'll seat probably a dozen tires.
 

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Ever wonder how long it takes to fill a 5 gallon air tank to 110 lbs?
I'm thinking quite a while, then your going to put it in your garage to sit for months? ...from harbor freight? ... OMG.
As I said...you don't need 100psi to seat a tire. 20 or 30 will do.
You're really over thinking this. I never said store it for months.
Fill it before you use it at a gas station.
You can get them anywhere. Hone Depot. Lowe's.
It's an air tank. Not a rocket ship. It'll hold air for weeks.
But that's not the point. The point is you can seat your tires without having a bike shop do it and you don't need an air compressor.
 

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You are worrying way too much about gauge accuracy, because your tires really don't care about the difference of a few PSI. As long as you can read the gauge and get to about the same pressure every time, you're good. Knowing the pressure is relatively meaningless because you should experiment "up or down" to find what works for you.
^^^ This.

If 80psi actually reads '82psi' on your gauge, and the ride/handling is what you like, then you just pump your tires to 82psi every time.
 

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Guys, it's gauge, not gage..
Gage is acceptable. It's quite common in the field of pressure gages/gauges.

Dwyer is one of the worlds largest Gage manufacturers.

GAGE OR GAUGE PRESSURE?
In the measurement and instrumentation literature and industry, the words gauge and gage can both be found to describe a pressure sensor or transmitter that measures relative to ambient pressure.


Penn State Engineering
Gage pressure (sometimes written as "gauge pressure") is measured relative to the local atmospheric pressure


 
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