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Rollin' Stones
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is it common to grease a steer tube? I mean lather the tube up when installing?
 

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Banned forever.....or not
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I always give a steel stearer tube a very thin coat of grease. I'll treat the inside of the stearer tube the same as I treat the steel frame tubes. Lindseed oil.
 

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No benefit at all to greasing the steer tube but it won't hurt anything. The grease needs to be on the bearings and races.

I'd stay away from linseed oil, however. It is not a lubricant nor is it a product designed to deter corrosion. It is used primarily to treat leather. It is basically a softener. Steel frame and steer tubes can be treated against corrosion by products designed for the purpose. If I remember right, the last one I used was called Frame Safe or something like that and came in a spray can. I can't tell you how effective it is because I don't ride in the rain and don't do anything that would rust my steelies.
 

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Rollin' Stones
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks

After working on a metal on metal sound on my bike when I apply a lot of force on the front of the bike, I decided to take it all apart again. I cleaned/regreased everything from stem, handlebar, and headset. The noise is gone. I thought that the steer tube had a lot of grease on it. I have a 1" threaded steerer/fork combo. The bolt that attaches to the star fangled nut looked like there was a bit of fraying on the very end. I am confused as to what would cause that?
 

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I don't know what a frayed bolt is. Sorry. A threaded steerer, however, doesn't use a star nut. Threadless steerers do. The star nut and cap and bolt are what are used to apply pressure to the headset bearings. On a threaded steerer you use the threading on the steerer and a nut for that purpose. Glad you got the problem resolved.
 

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Chili hed & old bike fixr
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Mr. FMW

fmw said:
No benefit at all to greasing the steer tube but it won't hurt anything. The grease needs to be on the bearings and races.

I'd stay away from linseed oil, however. It is not a lubricant nor is it a product designed to deter corrosion. It is used primarily to treat leather. It is basically a softener. Steel frame and steer tubes can be treated against corrosion by products designed for the purpose. If I remember right, the last one I used was called Frame Safe or something like that and came in a spray can. I can't tell you how effective it is because I don't ride in the rain and don't do anything that would rust my steelies.
Er, check your reference source. Neatsfoot oil is a leather softener and preservative. Linseed oil is frequently used to finish wood, as part of some paints and in the bicycle world a spoke thread lube that gets real gummy to help hold nipples snug on wheels that may not be as tight as required to lock the nipples in place. It would also work as a coating om metal parts to retard corrosion.
 

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curlybike said:
Er, check your reference source. Neatsfoot oil is a leather softener and preservative. Linseed oil is frequently used to finish wood, as part of some paints and in the bicycle world a spoke thread lube that gets real gummy to help hold nipples snug on wheels that may not be as tight as required to lock the nipples in place. It would also work as a coating om metal parts to retard corrosion.
You're correct about the neatsfoot oil. Linseed oil, as I recall now is one of the oils that is used in varnish to carry the resins. Nevertheless, I wouln't put linseed oil in my frame. You can do as like with your frame.
 

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Yes, lindseed oil has been used to prevent rust inside frame tubes since the 1800's. In fact, it was the only product available until the 1980's when "Frame Saver" came out. I've used both, and lindseed oil works just as good. (and costs about $0.25 per frame to do)
I always put a little grease on the outside of the stearer tube to prevent surface rust on it's unpainted surface.
A properly prepaired (and taken care of) steel frame can be ridden in the rain without any problems. The only rusty frames you see, have been abused and neglected.
 

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Linseed oil is a pretty standard way to keep metal from corroding. Nice and cheap too.

And, yes, grease any metal/metal contact surfaces... if you plan on disassembling them again later. (Sales of never-seize wouldn't be so good if it weren't necessary.)
 

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Chili hed & old bike fixr
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What kind of problems arise when a frame loaded with Frame Saver, needs to be repaired. Say it needs a new seat or chain stay. I suspect that it is kinda tough to get that contamination out of the frame???
 

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It burns

curlybike said:
What kind of problems arise when a frame loaded with Frame Saver, needs to be repaired. Say it needs a new seat or chain stay. I suspect that it is kinda tough to get that contamination out of the frame???
Since we are talking a steel frame, then when the heat of the brazing torch or TIG welder is applied, the Frame Saver will go up in smoke like a dried out newspaper. NOT an issue.
 
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