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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
...Not fun. I was moving to the left, onto the road from the shoulder and the front tire got caught along a ridge.. it was over in a second. Thankfully, no cars were following as I was tossed into the middle of the road. Could have been a lot worse, just banged up a little.

I just bought this bike two weeks ago and getting back into biking after 10 years, hopefully this is just one of those freak things and not a sign that I'm getting too old to get back into it. :cryin: So... I'm taking the bike back to the shop tonight to get it checked, I was able to ride it home but better safe than sorry. Will be back out there on the road this weekend if my wrist holds up.

As I applied another round of Neosporin and gauze to my ass this morning, the thought crossed my mind that maybe a hybrid bike would be the safer choice? Someone help me out here before I wimp out and trade this bike in! I really should get out there on the road again before my mind starts playing tricks on me. :D
 

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Sorry to hear of your crash. Hopefully, you injuries were minor. I don't see how changing bikes would make much, if any, difference. They all have 2 wheels, require the same skills to ride, and can all fall over. If you like the bike you have - and you must, because you bought it - I'd say stick with it.

The old saying, "It's like riding a bike...you never forget", is only partially true. After a long time off anybodys skills can get a little rusty. Good on you for starting again. Keep on keepin' on. :thumbsup:
 

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Another option would be to look at larger road tire. If you are riding on some 23's they will slide out and have more problems with the bumps. I would think a better option then a hybrid would be to slap some 28's on there. They still may not have stopped this wreck, but would have been a little better. You need to learn what your bike can and can not do, a mountain bike they are not.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
wim said:
Here's what probably happened: the path of your front wheel across the ridge was at too shallow of an angle. If you slow down enough while still on the shoulder so that you can make your front wheel take the path in the right-hand picture, you'll have no problems.
Wim that is exactly what happened. I'll know now to take that sharper angle regardless of whether or not I can see a ridge on the road. Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
gatman said:
Another option would be to look at larger road tire. If you are riding on some 23's they will slide out and have more problems with the bumps. I would think a better option then a hybrid would be to slap some 28's on there. They still may not have stopped this wreck, but would have been a little better. You need to learn what your bike can and can not do, a mountain bike they are not.
I think I am riding 23s (700x23 maybe?)... This is definitely a possibility. Will ask the LBS about it when I have the bike in tonight for inspection. Good idea! :thumbsup:
 

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hey there, i had this happen to me on a mountain bike (not the huge tires but maybe double the 23's?) too so no bike is truly safe. it's a newbie mistake but thankfully a merciful one for both of us. look at the diagrams someone above posted, thats a good visualization of it. the smaller the angle you engage the elevation the bigger the chance you might ride the rail and fall. 90degrees is not really feasible but make it big and make it fast.

you could also avoid riding on the shoulder, stay on the road but watch for the sewer grates.. check the sidewalls of the tires, i'm sure there's nothin wrong with them but see if they would be compromised. new bike so probably not a big issue. Glad you came out alright :thumbsup:
 

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Always cross ridges & gaps at an angle. If you can't, pick up the front wheel. All it takes is a tug on the bars timed with a downstroke of a pedal. Your rear tire may track on the ridge but you can usually ride that out. Whereas if the front tracks on the ridge as you cross it, you go down.

You don't need to do a big wheelie with the front, just a little lift that barely gets it off the ground.
 

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knock on wood a thousand times over.....

but i crashed within my fisrt 2 weeks on the bike. luckily i went off the raod and landed in the mud/grass. other than an hour to pick mud out of my chain/cassette and a bruised ego, the bike and i were totally find.....

ive had a few close calls, some low speed tumbles (foot isnt out all the way, hit some sand trying to stop, trying to trackstand, other stupid stuff) i knock on wood havent had big spill since then.....so about 2 months and 1000miles, 10 races......and hopefully wont have one for a long time to come.

what im trying to say i guess is that it happens to everyone, better it happens now, where you and your bike come out ok, and you learn from it, rather than in the middle of a 100 person pack and bikes get broke, and worse, it sends people to the hospital as a result.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
screwdriver said:
tnx for these kinda threads - im learnin a lot and hopefully i can apply this .
been ridin for 2 weeks only .
Then learn well from my NOOB mistake. Maybe, in some twisted way it gives meaning to my life, even if it is to serve as a warning to others. :D

My @ss should be recovered enough to get back out on the road this weekend. Lesson learned!
 

· I drank what?
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There are two type of riders..

As the old saying gos 'There are two types of riders, those who have crashed and those who will crash'

I've hit the ground 4 times. 2 times I just wasn't paying enough attention the other 2 were because of road/weather conditions.
 

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your accident is pretty common..

liftin said:
Then learn well from my NOOB mistake. Maybe, in some twisted way it gives meaning to my life, even if it is to serve as a warning to others. :D

My @ss should be recovered enough to get back out on the road this weekend. Lesson learned!
I was out in February on a rural route in a downpour this past winter (fun way to begin my spring training) and had a similar "experience"...tires hit a pavement seam as I moved left. the seam held my tires in line for a split second as my weight shifted left...it was all over in a second...me, sliding across wet pavement headfirst on my left side...I actually went pretty far before the roadrash stopped me. pretty pathetic...drenched, pissed off, and bloody and nobody to blame (no one was around). again, like you said, could have been worse...
a training partner of mine tells horror stories of a group paceline in New Mexico hitting a similar road seam...took out 6-8 guys at high speed.
 

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actually this is a good idea

jaseone said:
or just bunny hop the ridges ;)
smiley aside, learning to bunnyhop your roadbike is a good idea. I used to ride BMX in the early 80's and the bunnyhopping skills l had were very useful on a roadbike. Riding about 30 mph I had to hop a chunk of blocktop that had pushed itself upwards against the concrete portion of roadway. I cleared 4" with the front tire and grazed the chunk of asphalt with the back tire. I was able to ride away without incident. Otherwise, I'm sure I would have endoed and faceplanted myself on the road.

BTW... keep the roadbike, don't get a hybrid.
 

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Broken Elbow

Around the beginning of April, I decided that after a long absence (approx. 15 years) that I wanted to start riding a bicycle again (I work out at the gym, including a stationary bike). I was riding 15 to 20 miles a day 4 or 5 times a week. Well about 4 weeks ago, I took a spill while trying to get out of a car's way. Well I ended up breaking the Radius Head of my right arm (the car never sopped). I did manage to ride my bike home before the swelling and pain got too bad. My doc says the arm is healing and no surgery is required. Hopefully, he will clear me in the next few weeks to get back on the bike.
 

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wim said:
Here's what probably happened: your path across the ridge was at too shallow of an angle. Slow down considerably while still on the shoulder, then make your front wheel take the path in the right-hand picture.

Good advice. This concept can also be applied to crossing railroad tracks. Try to be as perpendicular to the tracks as possible when crossing them. Those rail crossings that have the tracks cutting across at 45 degress can be front wheel taco makers for sure.
 

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here is one that no one has reccomended... if you have super slick/light aero race wheels get yourself some cheep 32 spoke wheels, , if not ride on... then find yourself a nice soccer field or dirt road. Ride your road bike around, feel the way it moves slides ect. It is a quick way to get better at your bike handleing at lower speed with a softer landing.
 

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glad you're ok. With time, it will become an invaluable learning experience..

always pay attention, and always learn to improve your bike skills. I used to curse living in the city, tram tracks everywhere here, broken poor roads etc. On the other hand it really forces you to be able to handle your bike. Trackstands aren't just for looking good, you'll be surprised how much control and balance you have once you can do these comfortably. It never ceases to amaze me how many people on group rides are forced to clip out some what shakily on short notice. With fatigue, this almost always results in unneccessary trouble.

Perhaps i am going to seem like a big tool for suggesting this, but i would shun the big tire idea. I'm assuming you got a road bike for a reason. As was suggested before, moving to (marginally) wider treads wouldn't solve the issue, so why blame the equipment? My suggestion? keep in mind what it is you are riding and you should be right, learn to appreciate what it can and cant do, moreover, you'll better appreciate the roadie for what it does best in its 'proper' configuration.
 
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