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Every little counts...
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http://www.cyclingnews.com/news.php?id=news/2006/mar06/mar17news2

UCI cracks down on Stazio criteriums
By Anthony Tan

Organisers of a series of what are now been referred to as 'charity' criteriums in Boulder, Colorado have met with the disapproval of cycling's governing body, the Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI), after allowing professionals to compete in an unsanctioned event. In the past, the UCI has often turned a blind eye to unsanctioned charity rides that include the token professional or two, but the fact that Tyler Hamilton, who recently lost a much-publicised appeal to the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) and competed in the first event held on March 5, most likely has something to do with it.

In November 2005, Hamilton's charity foundation, the Tyler Hamilton Foundation (THF) formed a partnership with Denver Boulder Couriers (DBC) to promote a cycling in Colorado through a long-running series of events known as the Criteriums @ Stazio series. Beginning on March 5 and scheduled each weekend till May, a portion of the entry fees from the series and three additional road races in April is channeled back to the THF, with the funds used to support cycling in the area.

At the time the alliance was created, Denver Boulder Couriers decided each of these races would be unsanctioned to keep entry costs down and allow all levels of racing from young children to seasoned professionals. Furthermore, in 2007, the Criteriums @ Stazio series had been planned to be taken over by the City of Boulder. However, these groundwork plans and in particular the unsanctioned nature of the event, have garnered the angst of the UCI, recently contacting the event organisers to inform them that rule 1.2.019 would be enforced, thereby prohibiting UCI-licensed professionals from participating.

Rule 1.2.019 states:

No License holder may participate in an event that has not been included on a national, continental, or world calendar or that has not been recognized by a national federation, a continental confederation or the UCI. A national federation may grant special exceptions for races or particular events run in its own country.

If professionals choose to continue competing in the Criteriums @ Stazio series, they would risk a fine of 100 Swiss Francs and up to one month's suspension - the latter enough of a deterrent for a paid professional. A number of forums, including www.tetoncycling.com run by Colorado-based cycling coach Jon Tarkington, have urged those who believe the UCI is jeopardising the event to "not let local events that make difference in the lives of so many, young and old throughout our country be threatened. Do not stand by while cyclists who've done no wrong are threatened with suspensions. Let your voice be heard."

One of the most recent posts urges 'believers' to send a letter to USA Cycling's (USAC) most senior staff member, including CEO Gerard Bisceglia, advocating the THF/DBC-run event and all unsanctioned charity events throughout the country. It reads: "One the major activities of USA Cycling ensure the ongoing development and safe participation in the sport of cycling. They have not accomplished that goal through this recent action and they need to hear from their constituents."

The post ends with a familiar tag-line: "This is about believing. It is about believing in our communities, and our rights as individuals. It is about believing in the power of the bike. Join us in our efforts to make a difference."
I figured this would happpen sooner or later. Now, the UCI generally turns a blind eye to this (Lance rides charity rides, pros ride cyclosportifs in their home countryies, etc) but when a convicted doper gets into it, the UCI has to invoke the rule above.

Basically, if you want to race pro, you get a UCI license. To keep your UCI license, you play by the rules. If you don't like the rules, go start your own pro tour. Simple.

I'm siding with the UCI on this. Discuss.
 

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NeoRetroGrouch
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Spunout said:
http://www.cyclingnews.com/news.php?id=news/2006/mar06/mar17news2



I figured this would happpen sooner or later. Now, the UCI generally turns a blind eye to this (Lance rides charity rides, pros ride cyclosportifs in their home countryies, etc) but when a convicted doper gets into it, the UCI has to invoke the rule above.

Basically, if you want to race pro, you get a UCI license. To keep your UCI license, you play by the rules. If you don't like the rules, go start your own pro tour. Simple.

I'm siding with the UCI on this. Discuss.
I don't see who races in a charity event is any business of the UCI. They are just exercising every power they can over those who attempt to overturn any of their rulings (re. Hondo).

Personally, though it would certainly curtail (eliminate??) any Americans making it to the pro ranks, Olympics, etc; I think that amateur racing in the US would be much better off if USAC broke away from UCI totally. I see the purpose of the UCI is to maintain the cycling power in continental Europe. - TF
 

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I suspect they wouldn't have bothered, but for TH involvement.

Sean Kelly used to ride the Christmas Hamper Races in Ireland with no problem. No one was worried when Tom Boonen rode the charity event in Doha recently.

But when a high level doper not only rides, but is also involved in organising a series of events, that's a bit much.

The website for these crits stated that expired licences are acceptable. TH's licence is not expired, it's suspended. He hasn't chosen not to renew it, it's been taken away from him. He is barred from racing.

To the outside world it would appear that, although TH has been convicted and his appeals rejected, he is still competing. What does that tell the outside world about our sport's efforts to keep itself clean?

If TH or any other convicted doper wants to ride in a charity event, fine. But as soon as there is a competitive element he is taking the mickey. He can train for all he is worth in preparation for the end of his ban but don't race. It's an insult to our intelligence.
 

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Every little counts...
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
TurboTurtle said:
I don't see who races in a charity event is any business of the UCI. They are just exercising every power they can over those who attempt to overturn any of their rulings (re. Hondo).

Personally, though it would certainly curtail (eliminate??) any Americans making it to the pro ranks, Olympics, etc; I think that amateur racing in the US would be much better off if USAC broke away from UCI totally. I see the purpose of the UCI is to maintain the cycling power in continental Europe. - TF
They're not controlling the events. They are putting the hammer down on PROs (even suspended pros). This is not about amateurs.
 

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USAC can't break away from UCI

TurboTurtle said:
Personally, though it would certainly curtail (eliminate??) any Americans making it to the pro ranks, Olympics, etc; I think that amateur racing in the US would be much better off if USAC broke away from UCI totally. I see the purpose of the UCI is to maintain the cycling power in continental Europe. - TF
USAC breaking away from UCI is a non-starter. If they did, not only would no US rider be able to attend World Championships or the Olympics (both of which are run through the UCI), but US riders wouldn't even be able to ride in any pro races.

Remember that UCI does not license riders directly - they are licensed through their national federations. With no UCI affiliated national federation, there would be no US riders with UCI licenses. (There could still be American Pro riders - but they would have to get their licenses through some other country's national cycling federation.)

Also keep in mind that the reason USAC was created in the first place is because UCI required that each participating nation have a single national cycling federation (USAC governs USCF, USPro, NORBA and NCCA).
 
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