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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When doing hard trainer workouts or riding on the road, when I'm done, I always feel like my hamstrings and quads have had a good workout with occasional cramping in the hamstrings (never quads) during time after a hard ride, mild soreness and fatigue in both hamstrings and quads, but really never feel like my glutes are sore, tired, or worked hard during or after a hard ride / training session. Makes me think I am missing a big part of what should be making power for me.

I ride tops, drops, and out of the saddle. With the out of the saddle i'm feeling mostly quads and reasonably balanced between quads and hamstrings on the tops or in the drops.

I've been riding 10 months now, about 4500 miles including 1800 trainer miles over the Winter. My average weekly TSS is runs between 500 and 600 if that matters.

So is this normal or am I missing something in the way I am engaging my muscles / pedaling during time on the bike? If not normal, suggestions?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks, I tried that some on a ride this morning. I need to move my saddle back for that to work for me I think, was sitting on the end of the saddle to get my hips rolled forward to keep my shoulders and arms in a normal position. I didn't try it enough to notice much difference in glutes being worked, but it's a noticable difference in pedal stroke.
 

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I have never had fatigue in my glutes after a ride, even if it has been heavy climbing. I think the issue is that the glutes are one of the largest/strongest muscles in the body and the quads and hamstrings are smaller thus they will give out before you can fatigue the glutes. Even when I do leg presses in the gym, i will feel it more in the quads vs glutes.

Rolling your hips forward will help utilize your glutes more and produce more power but I still do not believe you will be able to feel the burn in the glutes, at least I never have.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Rolling your hips forward will help utilize your glutes more and produce more power but I still do not believe you will be able to feel the burn in the glutes, at least I never have.
thanks, I won't be expecting any fatigue/soreness then, but will continuing to work on rolling my hips forward.
 

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Thanks, I tried that some on a ride this morning. I need to move my saddle back for that to work for me I think, was sitting on the end of the saddle to get my hips rolled forward to keep my shoulders and arms in a normal position. I didn't try it enough to notice much difference in glutes being worked, but it's a noticable difference in pedal stroke.
I don't think you or anyone for that matter really feels the glutes "working more" per se. You're just recruiting them a little more in concert with all the other muscles that are used to pedal.

It was difficult to figure out exactly how to do it at first. The best way I can describe it is to imagine a 45lbs weight tied around your mid section with a long string while in the drops. The weight will pull your belly button towards the top tube creating a curve in your back much like someone with severe sway back. This motion will tilt the top of the pelvis forward. It helps me to move back a cm or two then tilt forward. It's very subtle but, having better flexibility especially in the hamstring and glutes will help you get into and stay in position.

IMO Having a wider nosed saddle is also helpful to support your soft tissue when rolled forward. Something like the Specialized Romin or the Fizik Antares come to mind.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Seat was moved back a little and down a little for the ride this morning - Thanks for the visualization on how to get the hips rolled forward. I tried it and it works very well. I'm going to have to concentrate on I can tell, I slip back to my normal posture quickly if I'm not thinking about it. I'm using a Romin saddle now so the soft tissue doesn't suffer as much, but I did find more pressure on the muscles in that area and not much on the sit bones - is that typical you think?
 

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I think it is for most who understand the position. It is the same for me and I don't see how it can be any other way. One thing I don't understand is if you can move things forward too much. In general I think what you want to achieve is a posture on the bike as close to a normal posture off the bike if that makes sense...
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Makes sense - have had a bit more practicing in the flat back position with the seat adjusted further back and lower. Not doing it all the time but rotating back and forth between this and my normal posture on the bike, I can feel the difference over the course of a ride in the reduction of fatigue in my other leg muscles so I would say it's working. It definitely helps keep my head up so I can look down the road too. Thanks for the help, more time will hopefully make this my new more normal posture riding.
 

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