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Recently purchased (Early march) a 56cm Spec. allez. The bike felt good when I tested it in the shop and was told for my size (5'10 1/12) it would be a good fit. Well, it has been. I got a free fit with the bike when I purchased it and in the trainer it felt good. However once I started putting miles on the bike I started noticing that the only thing that feels bad are my palms (to be specific, mainly the part of the palm that's in contact with the huds).

I scheduled a follow up appointment and after the shops "fit" guy checked out my posture on the bike he couldn't tell what the problem was. I walked out and I believe he dropped the stem a spacer and tilted the bars a hair up. (I was also advised that if I do not work on my core, that I should as this would fix this problem. I do not do many core exercises) However, this has no fixed the problem as it has not made any significant change in my comfort. I've had the bike for a month since than and I've noticed that the pain is almost instant, I feel like I'm putting to much weight on my hands the second I get on the bike. At 2 or so miles the pain in my palms reaches it's plateau and right around 12 or so miles my hands just go numb. I've tried some half gloves, but to no avail. Any ideas? Having a hard time enjoying my bike because of this pain.
 

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Cycling induced anoesis
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Some thoughts... You say you got your bike in March, but don't say if you're new to road riding. If so, then your anatomy does need to become accustomed to the road riding position. To help that process along, it would be beneficial to build your core strength. There are some simple exercises you can do. Also, keep a light hold on the bars/ hoods, change hand positions frequently and keep the upper body relaxed. It all helps to minimize the likelihood of numbness.

That said, it's entirely possible that you have too much weight (thus, pressure) on your hands. I would ask your LBS to reinstall the spacer and move your saddle back 5mm's. Assuming it's now level, have them raise the tip slightly. They may need to readjust height after making these changes.

Once the adjustments are made, get some saddle time in and assess if this is helping to lessen the pressure. Based on the results, decide if further action is required. If you see some improvement, you can still make small (aft) saddle adjustments, but you want them done in small increments and slowly, because your body needs time to adjust, and there's always a chance of introducing a new fit problem if you're not careful.

Getting a little ahead of things, but if the initial or second adjustments aren't helping, I'd reset things back to the first change and start looking at excessive (for you) reach/ saddle to bar drop. You don't mention sliding forward or neck/ shoulder pain, so I think that's less likely to be the problem.

BTW, I'd keep wearing the gloves. There's a safety element to doing so, but they also have some ability to absorb vibrations.
 

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I too suffered from a numb left hand but it has almost disappeared since I had a Pro Bike Fit from a different LBS. You might want to going to another LBS.

Also and maybe more importantly improving your core strength does make a huge difference. It will help you relax and you'll better enjoy your bike.
 

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Common problem from too much weight ont he hands. There are a few ways to fix this:

1)Core strength. What your core can't support, your hands must.

2)Position - less weight on hands means higher/closer bars. This also will mean more weight on your rear end, so it's always a trade off. A stem with a rise to it, or a shorter stem may help. At least stems are relatively innexpensive when it comes to bike parts. Your LBS may let you try a few different rise/length options on a loaner stem before purchasing one.

3)Less time on hand pressure points. I must move my hands frequently during rides. By frequently, I mean every few (5) minutes. Not a lot, but a little. I move forward and back near the hoods, to the bars, to the edge of the bars, etc. Sometimes I ride with the sides of my hands on the bars but not actually gripping the bars. Just so the same spot on my hands isn't always providing the support for my upper body that my core can't support.

4)Shock absorbtion -- on chip seal and on hard rides/drafting/climbing I notice this more. A bar tape with gel helps, good gloves help (I went through many to find one I like (Giro brand, leather ones), proper relaxed elbows/shoulders help. If your elbows are locked, you're missing a natural shock absorber. Every bump jars all your hand-supported weight right to the palms. Not good. A light, relaxed grip on the bars is optimal. I constantly remind myself to just barely hover over the bars, no death grip. When I get tired on the bike, I'm more likely to grip tight, lock elbows, stay in one position -- all a recipe for numb fingers for me.

My first metric century my left fingers were numb for over an hour. So numb I could not feel the shift levers. I damaged the nerve in my hand to the point that it took several weeks for my finger tips to not feel constantly asleep. Don't do this!
 

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You may have carpal tunnel and/or guyon's canal problems. I did.

You can only tell for sure with an EMG test but it is conclusive as to nerve damage.
I had bilateral CT release and GC "clean out" last Fall and I've had no problems this season.
Healing did take six months, though (exactly as the surgeon predicted).
 
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