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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm looking at the new dv46c wheels and after reading an article about the strength of reynolds rims because of the high spoke tensions, I'm wondering if buying the wheels factory and putting in aftermarket ceramic bearings is better than getting them built up with the better 190 hubs and aero spokes. Will the custom wheels have worse durability and strength?

Any comments welcome.
Thanks
 
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I would say it would all depend on who is building them. You may want to consider what effect your two options have on the warranty as well. I have a feeling that replacing the bearings on stock Reynolds might mess up the coverage, and they do have some similar to Mavic's MP3 plan. On the other hand if you have someone build up wheels with 190's Reynolds will warranty the rims only but the builder might warranty the whole build, not sure what DT's warranty on the hubs is.
 

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shellshock said:
after reading an article about the strength of reynolds rims because of the high spoke tensions
Source? Reynold's spec on tension isn't high at all.

Model Front [N] Rear Drive [N]
DV46 T 550-765 1140-1490
DV46 UL 475-622 875-1140
MV32 T 625-785 1140-1490
KOM 625-785 875-1140
MV32 C 550-765 875-1140
DV46 C 550-765 875-1140
Cross 550-765 1140-1490
Solitude 850-1000 1000-1250

I like Reynolds rims a lot, but I can't comment on the build... but I'm sure a good custom builder will do at *least* as good a job. DT240 hubs are fine... though 190 hubs are even nicer... and probably better yet (and cheaper) if you sub an Alchemy on the front... ~40g lighter anyway.

DT has a 2 year warranty and you can get the Reynolds crash insurance on the rims if you go custom.
 

· monkey with flamethrower
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A wheel build is only as good as its builder. You could have the best components in the world and end up with lots of broken spokes and out of true wheels, or vica-versa. And save some coin and stick with the standard 240's hubs or if you want something exotic and Extralight or Tune hub. Ceramic bearings won't give you any relevant durability or performance increases despite all the marketing claims.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
thanks

Yeah, the wheelbuilders are prowheelbuilders.com and they give a year warranty anyway so I 'd be pretty sure they'd build top quality wheels. The article I read was in pro cycling and now that you say it I think the high spoke tension was more a passing comment but I was impressed the strength of the wheels to carry 800 lbs and then only break the spokes. Also I was wondering about the 190's bearings and whether they are as good as enduro zero bearings or is the difference worth the money.

Thanks for the feedback so far.
 

· monkey with flamethrower
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Bearings are bearings. Any high quality bearing is a high quality bearing, ceramic or otherwise. Since almost all decent quality Silicon Nitride bearing balls are made by the same company, SKF, there really aren't that many differences between bearings. There may be some differences in the races, retainer cages and seals but more often then not, there won't be. Just like carbon fiber frames most bearings in the world are made in the same places, just placed into a different box. I can guarantee that you won't be able to tell any difference in what kind of bearing you are running while riding be it ceramic or steel. Ceramic bearings as I've said earlier won't impart any magical benefits or last any longer than a good steel bearing. I do think the 190's hub is pretty awesome, it took some clever engineering to squeeze 30 grams out of the 240's hub.
 

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Specifications

Rubber Lizard said:
Bearings are bearings. Any high quality bearing is a high quality bearing, ceramic or otherwise.
Agree with the second part, but it disagrees with the first part. Cheap, low specification bearings are not the same as high quality bearings. Bearings have specifications/grades, and at the same grade and/or specification, ceramics offer exactly zero benefit in bicycle applications.
 

· monkey with flamethrower
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Kerry Irons said:
Agree with the second part, but it disagrees with the first part. Cheap, low specification bearings are not the same as high quality bearings. Bearings have specifications/grades, and at the same grade and/or specification, ceramics offer exactly zero benefit in bicycle applications.
So you disagree that a bearing is a bearing but agree that all high quality bearings are high quality bearings? Sorry, just got to give you a hard time on that one in a playful manner.
 

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DT 190 hub is hybrid ceramic, the harder ceramic balls will wear the races faster than the 240 hubs. They are stupid expensive, you will save a few grams of weight for a hub that will not be as durable, or as easily serviced.
Not to mention the fact that you want to use the heavier carbon clincher wheels.

I have Edge 1.0 38 tubular laced to DT 240 hubs and they are plenty fast, if you have the motor, which everyone seems to forget you cant buy at the bike shop.

I wonder how many of you cheering the 190 hubs have actually used them...?? In comparison with the 240's.....??

If you want the Reynolds wheels I would just buy the stock version, and save your money.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
If you want the Reynolds wheels I would just buy the stock version, and save your money.[/QUOTE]


The custom wheels I thinking of building up are actually $50 cheaper than the stock ones even with sapim aero spokes. But I've been told a tune mag 160 is the rear hub to get, and its only $40 more expensive than the 190. If that hub config. is good enough for top of the range Lightweights than its good enough for me.
 
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