Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Boobies!
Joined
·
8,170 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Winter is coming, so I shifted my attention to the half-finished front yard, where I cut in the new front door a coupla years ago, and left a pallet for a stoop to get in and out.

Tuesday, I excavated a nice size pad by hand and picked up materials including bagged concrete mix. Wednesday, I picked up a yard of crushed stone (a lot for my pickup), and mixed enough concrete to finish. Did the final troweling as I was losing my light.

Yesterday I was barely ambulatory--saved by the fact that it was raining.

Hard work is indeed hard.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,020 Posts
It surely is.

Hubby & I built our house all the while working full time. We did the framing, finishing and landscaping and didn't have all the equipment that the pros have. Don't know how we got through it, but we did. Moved in 4 months after the foundation was dug.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,389 Posts
I've chemically removed about 400 square feet of lead based paint on one side of my house this summer. it wasn't supposed to be like this, but all of the paint on the N. side of the house was failing on the original cedar siding (circa. 1909). the wife preferred I didn't take the rotary sander to it and dust the entire neighborhood. scraping soft, wet, chemically pealed lead paint is hard (disgusting), while trying to collect it under the ladder and not it get all over the damn place. It took about 6 weeks to strip, seal, and re-paint the area in between weekend plans and work obligations. I'll be done on Thursday with any luck.

Then onto replacing the kitchen faucet and installing the last 2 replacement windows before winter arrives...
 

·
Frog Whisperer
Joined
·
40,916 Posts
It surely is.

Hubby & I built our house all the while working full time. We did the framing, finishing and landscaping and didn't have all the equipment that the pros have. Don't know how we got through it, but we did. Moved in 4 months after the foundation was dug.
This except it was my wife and I.......hey, you're not my wife are you?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
873 Posts
Having been in construction for 25+ years now, I have to chuckle about your versions of hard work. I rarely have to work like that anymore, but I'll take an honest day outside, sweating, bending, building and lifting any day over sitting at the desk. That to me is HARD work.

Not wanting to discourage you from DIY projects, but a comical axiom around my parts goes like this; "why pay for quality when you can do it yourself?"
 

·
Frog Whisperer
Joined
·
40,916 Posts
Having been in construction for 25+ years now, I have to chuckle about your versions of hard work. I rarely have to work like that anymore, but I'll take an honest day outside, sweating, bending, building and lifting any day over sitting at the desk. That to me is HARD work.

Not wanting to discourage you from DIY projects, but a comical axiom around my parts goes like this; "why pay for quality when you can do it yourself?"
For the most part, I hire a contractor if it requires tools that are more than the cost of hiring them. I have saved at least 1/2 the value of my home by building it myself, to say nothing of the substantial interest we have saved. If you haven't seen posts with pictures of the house look around. I have hired a few contractors who have made very serious mistakes. The labor on my place was easily worth it.
 

·
Not Banned
Joined
·
49,013 Posts
I've chemically removed about 400 square feet of lead based paint on one side of my house this summer. it wasn't supposed to be like this, but all of the paint on the N. side of the house was failing on the original cedar siding (circa. 1909). the wife preferred I didn't take the rotary sander to it and dust the entire neighborhood. scraping soft, wet, chemically pealed lead paint is hard (disgusting), while trying to collect it under the ladder and not it get all over the damn place. It took about 6 weeks to strip, seal, and re-paint the area in between weekend plans and work obligations. I'll be done on Thursday with any luck.

Then onto replacing the kitchen faucet and installing the last 2 replacement windows before winter arrives...

use a heat gun next time

kicks ass over the chem peelers

of all the hem peelers "Peel Away 1" was best
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
873 Posts
The labor on my place was easily worth it.
Like I said, I don't want to discourage you. If you have the time and determination, by all means, go for it. There is a very substantial and satisfying feeling looking back at a completed project. If you really saved 50% then you must put a very low value on your own time. A dollar may not have been spent, but there was a price to be paid with your time, sweat and energies.
It also hurts the whole profession that there are shysters out there doing shoddy work and taking advantage of people. I fight that on a regular basis.
 

·
Russian Troll Farmer
Joined
·
3,416 Posts
Early last summer, just as I thought I had recuperated from my near-death experience, I decided it was time to strip off the last shreds of the crappy paint from my deck and re-paint it with one of those new heavy-duty deck paints. So, I rented a floor sander. Years ago, I used to to roofing and siding, so I though "how bad could this be"?

OMG. First, the [email protected] thing weighed nearly 100 lbs, and I had to transport it in my old Camry. Well, a couple of 2x4's created a ramp of sorts, but I still had to wheel it to the back yard, up the steps, and then sand down the deck and get it back within 24 hrs.

At the end, I was exhausted, and just barely got the thing back in the Camry for return the next morning. Even drove it back with the handle in my face....
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
40,807 Posts
use a heat gun next time

kicks ass over the chem peelers

of all the hem peelers "Peel Away 1" was best


This, so long as you don't breathe the fumes; apparently, the heat releases some toxic vapors. But it sure works faster and with less mess than chemical agents.

Oh, and make sure not to set things afire.
 

·
Not Banned
Joined
·
49,013 Posts
This, so long as you don't breathe the fumes; apparently, the heat releases some toxic vapors. But it sure works faster and with less mess than chemical agents.

Oh, and make sure not to set things afire.
I used a ventilator but am pretty sure I knocked a year or 2 off my life
 

·
Boobies!
Joined
·
8,170 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Having been in construction for 25+ years now, I have to chuckle about your versions of hard work. I rarely have to work like that anymore, but I'll take an honest day outside, sweating, bending, building and lifting any day over sitting at the desk. That to me is HARD work.

Not wanting to discourage you from DIY projects, but a comical axiom around my parts goes like this; "why pay for quality when you can do it yourself?"
Well, if you can't afford to hire people, but can manage the materials, then DIY is a good choice.

Besides, T0G and I have graduated to the ranks of semi-pros. It may not be our main career, but we've been doing stuff and paying attention for a long time, and on a good day I would put my work up against all but the really unaffordable A--list pros, and I would do the same for ToG's work.

That said, I thought T0G made a wise choice this year to contract out his exterior painting (and roof I think)--and I don't do roofs anymore unless they are flat and low.
 

·
Boobies!
Joined
·
8,170 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Wood Logging Tan Trunk Lumber

Today's project--winter wood. Courtesy of our local Verizon subcontractor.

You want to find out how your forearms are--run a chainsaw for a day!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,389 Posts
Having been in construction for 25+ years now, I have to chuckle about your versions of hard work. I rarely have to work like that anymore, but I'll take an honest day outside, sweating, bending, building and lifting any day over sitting at the desk. That to me is HARD work.

Not wanting to discourage you from DIY projects, but a comical axiom around my parts goes like this; "why pay for quality when you can do it yourself?"
some of us do it ourselves....with quality.

just because someone is a contractor, doesn't make them professional or even good at what they do. Our houses was flipped in 2007 by a licensed "contractor"....I'd like to kick him in the nuts for all the crap work he did around here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,389 Posts
use a heat gun next time

kicks ass over the chem peelers

of all the hem peelers "Peel Away 1" was best
oh, now you say something! I'm actually done with the removal. too warm/windy to paint today however. the south wall may just experience a siding removal next summer at the hands of our contractors...its a mess of odd boards cut to odd sizes. the house 'flipper' must have removed some windows and half-assed the siding.
 

·
Frog Whisperer
Joined
·
40,916 Posts
paredown said:
That said, I thought T0G made a wise choice this year to contract out his exterior painting (and roof I think)--and I don't do roofs anymore unless they are flat and low.
no sir, we power washed and stained ourselves we contracted the roof only.

keeping in mind that we did it once (the first time, but it only lasted 31 years and still never leaked, the plywood looked like new when they tore the old shingles off.)

I know with a good deal of certainty, that we have a high quality home and saved over $250,000 just in labor alone. In reality, the makes us pro's, paid to do the job.

edit: also note, I do not have a single piece of OSB or flake board in our house anywhere.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29,557 Posts
And just think, 150 years ago 500,000 people walk across American in Summer without dri-fit clothing or modern shoes to (without guarantee) start a new life.

Your right --- life's tough.

Enjoy your youth (or middle age) as it only gets to be a steeper climb each passing day as you match off into the sunset.
 

·
Boobies!
Joined
·
8,170 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
no sir, we power washed and stained ourselves we contracted the roof only...
Faulty memory--that's the old age kicking in--and you got total cred for doing the roof the first time! And the paint job/power wash was beautiful when done.

edit: also note, I do not have a single piece of OSB or flake board in our house anywhere.
The geniuses that did the repairs on our roof used OSB as a roof substrate (WTF?) on a torch down roof--and then used a flashing that was too shallow to keep the water from wicking back--oh, and no gutters...

On my redo list--the one section I worked around I reflashed it for now and added a gutter..
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top