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Although I was initially a little skeptical of the ad, "Climb like a cycling God", I can now say Cyclo-core is an awesome program! I bought it about 3 months ago and started to apply the core strength exercises. I quickly discovered two things. Firstly, the strength routines are really challenging and secondly, my strong legs were attached to a big lump of weak jelly. It has definately made a difference to my climbing ability, like being middle of the group at the top of a hill, to now being in the leading bunch at the top! In the DVD, Graeme Street (author) does give some guidance as to how frequent you can use the routines.
Good luck and hope you get as much benefit as I did!
 

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Which exercises?

Spinnerman said:
I am sure it works because it incorporates Ashtanga Yoga as part of the routine. So why not just save some cash and purchase David Swenson's Short Forms Porgram at www. ashtanga.net
Was aware of Yoga well before Cyclo-Core. However, I lacked the knowledge of how Yoga could benefit my cycling and which specific exercises to use. As such, I never pursued it further.
I like the concept of a cyclist (author: Graeme Street) producing a DVD of exercises especially for cyclists and the way he explains why you're doing a specific exercise and how it will benefit you on the bike. Didn't find the cost unreasonable considering the number of routines I was getting.
 

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That is great. Like I said, I am sure it is a great program and what I have read about it on the website has impressed me, especially the fact that someone had the foresight to market a Yoga program within a cycling training program. I didn't say it was unreasonable, I just said more expensive than an Ashtanga Tape. I think it is just great marketing that someone who understands how effective Yoga can be in improving one's cycling abilities has marketed something like this for cyclists. If I were David Swenson, I would do the same thing. As a matter of fact, take a look at this website for a brief synopsis of how Power Yoga (a more western term or Ashtanga) can benefit athletes. They have marketed one for runners and I don't think it will be long before they market something for cyclists or triathletes as well. http://www.power-yoga.com/sports.ihtml

I had to chuckle a little because ALL of the Ashtanga Yoga poses are beneficial to cycling. I can't think of one specific pose that is better than another for cycling (this is the only thing I disagree with about the cyclo core statements on their website). The Ashtanga Poses are done in a specific order that was developed in such a way to allow the body to warm up and gently go deeper into the body (away from the extemities and into the core of the body) while also developing the strength and flexibility of the core. The poses build, one on top of the other, in a specific way to allow the body to unwind like unwinding a spring that is wound too tight. Besides improving and maintaining my core strength, I have found that Ashtanga has improved my proprioception. This awareness of my joints in space has helped to improve my bike handling and my sense of balance because I have an inner ear problem that was a problem for me at times prior to starting a regular routine of Ashtanga about 4 years ago.

At a minimum, if you are just going to do the cylo core program, I would recommend you find a beginners Ashtanga Yoga class in your area and go to the class once a week until you know how to have the correct form and breath for the poses. This will maximize the effectiveness of doing the Yoga and prevent injury by going into a pose or to far into a pose before your body is ready.

Good luck and I am always impressed when people see or begin to understand the benefit of Yoga when it comes to improving their cycling abilities.
 

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http://www.cyclecambridge.com/cbexercises.html

How does Cambridge Core (FREE) compare to this Ashtanga?


Spinnerman said:
That is great. Like I said, I am sure it is a great program and what I have read about it on the website has impressed me, especially the fact that someone had the foresight to market a Yoga program within a cycling training program. I didn't say it was unreasonable, I just said more expensive than an Ashtanga Tape. I think it is just great marketing that someone who understands how effective Yoga can be in improving one's cycling abilities has marketed something like this for cyclists. If I were David Swenson, I would do the same thing. As a matter of fact, take a look at this website for a brief synopsis of how Power Yoga (a more western term or Ashtanga) can benefit athletes. They have marketed one for runners and I don't think it will be long before they market something for cyclists or triathletes as well. http://www.power-yoga.com/sports.ihtml

I had to chuckle a little because ALL of the Ashtanga Yoga poses are beneficial to cycling. I can't think of one specific pose that is better than another for cycling (this is the only thing I disagree with about the cyclo core statements on their website). The Ashtanga Poses are done in a specific order that was developed in such a way to allow the body to warm up and gently go deeper into the body (away from the extemities and into the core of the body) while also developing the strength and flexibility of the core. The poses build, one on top of the other, in a specific way to allow the body to unwind like unwinding a spring that is wound too tight. Besides improving and maintaining my core strength, I have found that Ashtanga has improved my proprioception. This awareness of my joints in space has helped to improve my bike handling and my sense of balance because I have an inner ear problem that was a problem for me at times prior to starting a regular routine of Ashtanga about 4 years ago.

At a minimum, if you are just going to do the cylo core program, I would recommend you find a beginners Ashtanga Yoga class in your area and go to the class once a week until you know how to have the correct form and breath for the poses. This will maximize the effectiveness of doing the Yoga and prevent injury by going into a pose or to far into a pose before your body is ready.

Good luck and I am always impressed when people see or begin to understand the benefit of Yoga when it comes to improving their cycling abilities.
:cool:
 

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Hindu Pushups are called downward dog in Power Yoga. I see some relationship, but it is not exactly the same thing. Power or Ahtanga Yoga is performed on a Yoga Mat with bare feet. The poses, or Asanas are linked one to the other so you are either static (in a pose breathing and stretching) or active moving in a specific manner from one pose to the next by a series of linked movements. The full Ashtanga Series One is 26 poses that are linked sequentially one, after the other by a movement from one pose to the next. There is also a warmup routine called the Sun Salutations and a series of closing poses. However, the short forms have a 15 minute on the go (excellent for after workout stretching) or a 30 minute beginner (excellent for after workout, or weight training and for off season work) and a 45 minute intermediate. It is based on the same Ashtanga First Series but some of the poses are modified and some are left out for beginners.

The benefit of Ashtanga might be that the Cambridge exercises seem to be more same plane of movement as that which you would be on the bike. This will improve your bike strength but will not improve your proprioception and your flexibility as much because you are not twisting or stretching as much laterally as you will with Ashtanga. What happens to the body when you are asked to move beyond the bodies normal range of movement, such as a fall. Because you are very fit but limited in your range of motion on the bike, you are more likely to get injured then if you are not flexible. If you have tight hamstrings it is because you either have a week core, lack core stability or both. The hamstrings are one, but not the only muscle that compensates for an unbalanced core. The Cambridge exercises look like a good workout routine to be completed in the gym or the home gym as part of your weight training program. The Ashtanga will complement the Cambridge Program by developing even greater core stability and proprioception to go along with the core strength you are already developing.

If you can, go to a beginning Ashtanga Yoga Class. If you think it is beneficial, get the short forms to supplement and continue with the Ashtanga Class as one of the weight training days until you understand how to breathe and do the poses correctly. Then continue with the beginning short forms video and as you progress, then you can buy the first Ashtanga Series for the off season and modify poses as needed.
 

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Spinnerman, I appreciate your insight! My title "What Exercises?" again reflects how little I know about the subject. Thanks for links you've included. Am finding the reading most interesting. Your reference to find a class is supported by a friend of mine. When I told her I had a Yoga DVD she was concerned. She recommended I took classes to make sure I was doing he exercises correctly without hurting myself. Unfortunately, time contraints don't allow for classes at this stage. However, I'll read more and proceed cautiously!
Thanks again!
 
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