Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,469 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
greetings all

I have just ridden 140km (~90 miles) into 35km/h (25pmh?) head-cross-wind which is the closest I have ever come to climbing (I live by the sea so it is all flat out here).

The result of this ride is muscle soreness or at least strong muscle tension in upper calf area of both legs, right where the leg bends, behind the knee. Since all my riding has been in flat areas I wonder if this is just expected and will subside or perhaps it is a sign that my saddle height is not quite right? Or something else with cleats or saddle fore/aft position?

Any suggestions? Could the saddle be a touch too high for head-wind/climbing efforts? Any other ideas?

thanks in advance
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,808 Posts
Sounds normal. You probably haven't used your calf that much before?


acid_rider said:
greetings all

I have just ridden 140km (~90 miles) into 35km/h (25pmh?) head-cross-wind which is the closest I have ever come to climbing (I live by the sea so it is all flat out here).

The result of this ride is muscle soreness or at least strong muscle tension in upper calf area of both legs, right where the leg bends, behind the knee. Since all my riding has been in flat areas I wonder if this is just expected and will subside or perhaps it is a sign that my saddle height is not quite right? Or something else with cleats or saddle fore/aft position?

Any suggestions? Could the saddle be a touch too high for head-wind/climbing efforts? Any other ideas?

thanks in advance
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,638 Posts
Saddle height?

acid_rider said:
I have just ridden 140km (~90 miles) into 35km/h (25pmh?) The result of this ride is muscle soreness or at least strong muscle tension in upper calf area of both legs, right where the leg bends, behind the knee.
Most likely it is simply the extra effort of such a hard ride. The general rule is that if you have pain in the back of the knee, your saddle is too high, and if the pain is in the front, the saddle is too low. You might take a look at your saddle height.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,745 Posts
if your saddle ht. is correct (but it sounds like it is not)

it could be form or lack there of...
that was a long ride. toward the end when riders get tired our form gets sloppy. your quads could have given in a bit and demanded more work from your calfs. Stretch them out good. standing one one leg, with the ball of your foot on a stair and dropping your ankle is great for that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,452 Posts
Same thing happens to me when the wind is especially nasty. In these conditions, you simply can't coast. Your legs are constantly meeting resistance with no break. Any time you stop pedaling, you immediately feel the loss of speed, so your always working to maintain momentum. It's like riding a trainer. Plus, your upper body is constantly straining to keep you straight, constantly correcting your line. Sure it sucks and makes for a most un-fun ride, but it's very good training. I always take it easy after one of these rides because you WILL need more recovery than normal.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top