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IndyFab girl
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71 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm wondering if it would be worth it for me to invest in headset tools so I can finally do all work on my bikes. I guess I'm the one to answer that.

My quesion is, what tools will I need to do all headset work? I checked the Park website, and this is what I came up with:

1. Head cup removal tool (RT-1)
2. Crown race puller (CRP-1)
3. Bearing press (HHP-2)
4. Crown race setting tool (CRS-1)

The Park website also mentions a measuring caliper. I'm not sure what that is, or what I would need it for.

Hammer, hex wrenches, grease, etc I have. Am I missing something? Some of these tools are pretty expensive. I'm open to alternative suggestions, or tools I might do without.

Thanks.
 

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Resident Dutchbag
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11,864 Posts

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IndyFab girl
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71 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
If I'm removing an existing headset, and then re-installing it, do I still need the measuring caliper?

I'll check out the Cyclus tools, thanks.
 

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75 Posts
jp_nyc said:
If I'm removing an existing headset, and then re-installing it, do I still need the measuring caliper?

I'll check out the Cyclus tools, thanks.
Why bother reinstalling the same headset?

Instead of the crown race remover you can do just as well with a flat punch and a hammer. Take your time and you'll be fine.

The Cyclus headset press is ok, but there's other affordable tools out there that are just as good if not better (check Axiom).

To press the new crown race it's handy to have the right tool, but you can make your own with a headset spacer and a steel pipe.

If there's going to be incompatibility when changing headsets, it's often going to be with the fixed crown. Install that piece first before pressing anything into the frame. Calipers are nice, but not really needed anymore as pretty much all headset you can buy are of a standard size. Used to be that there were different crown/frame dimensions to fit different 1" headsets.

Edit: the calipers are helpful for measuring stack height, if you're dealing with threaded systems. You really have to check stack heights if you're going from a threaded loose bearing headset to a threaded cartrige headset, sometimes you simply won't have the steerer tube space to install the taller headset. Non-threaded systems almost always have spacers that you can play with if the stack height is off.
 

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IndyFab girl
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71 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
bg. said:
Why bother reinstalling the same headset?
Because I'm having a couple of frames repainted and I have CK headsets on them. No reason to change them, they're doing fine.

Thanks for the Axiom lead. I checked out rogger's link, and that website has really good prices on Cyclus tools, but they won't be able to ship until July (!).
 

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675 Posts
jp_nyc said:
Because I'm having a couple of frames repainted and I have CK headsets on them. No reason to change them, they're doing fine.

Thanks for the Axiom lead. I checked out rogger's link, and that website has really good prices on Cyclus tools, but they won't be able to ship until July (!).
You can always tape over the headset cups with masking tape.
 

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Hoopy Frood
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706 Posts
We don't need no stinkin tools

I prefer the "do it yourself" approach. Bear in mind, these methods are not for the faint of heart. You need to have a little swagger and recklessness in yourself to make them work. However, I've installed/replaced about 20 headsets using the tools and methods described below and have had no issues.

The first couple of times I removed/installed headsets, I followed the exact instructions at this link:

http://www.execulink.com/~dtierney/wmc/faq.htm#FHQ3

Now, I've evolved to using a home-made headset press and removal tool like this:

http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?p=1190007

The only thing I use a bike shop for nowadays is facing and tapping a new frame. Even then, the last two frames I've built up didn't need any work.

YMMV.
 
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