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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys,
I'm brand spanking new to cycling (4 rides - 44 miles to be exact) and got a Specialized Allez mainly for exercise and leisurely rides - no competition, no racing, no shaving :)
Anyway, since I just dropped over 1K on the bike and a few accessories, I'm debating on my next purchase.
A) Suunto T3c heart monitor - To keep me in my target zone
B) Cycling shoes and pedals - Improve performance, look like the other cool kids, etc...

'm a little aprehensive about the shoes, since I just had a very close encounter with a runner, who was very close to eating my bike:mad: If I had clipless shoes I would undoubtedly gone to the ground and crashed.
I would also want shoes that have recessed cleats, allowing me to walk with them, going into a restaurant, etc. (Thus loosing some of its performance benefits)

Any opinions?
Thanks

P.S. If you think shoes, I would love some recommendations
 

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Resident Curmudgeon
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My suggestion is...get the shoes & pedals. This is equipment that will really help you be more comfortable, smoother, more efficient, and have more endurance while riding. Ask any cyclist who's been riding for more than a couple of years this question: :If you were going to have to ride 150 miles next week, which would you rather have, clipless pedals & shoes, or a heart rate monitor.

Heart rate monitors are nice to have. Pedals, cleats and pedals aren't as optional.
 

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just get both, and get the shoes are that most comfortable. SIDI shoes are of the highest quality and fit a lot of people well due to the pliable materials its made out of. though they dotn fit all, so try on all brands and get the best fitting shoes. shoes are the most important piece of equipment in cycling. more so than dura ace or 5000 wheelsets.
 

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Descender
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Once you get used to the shoes and pedals (1 or 2 rides) - they become a must have. Once you get used to them you won't like riding without them.

The HR monitor, while nice is more of a training accessory - you can get by without it. If you get more seriously into the sport then get an HR monitor.

Since right now you are recreational - get the shoes and pedals
 

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Hit-and-Run Poster
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agreed with shoes and pedals. those are absolutely necessary for riding, more so than a heart rate monitor. I've never fallen with my clipless. The motion of putting your foot down when you're off balance usually gets my shoes unclipped, so there's no problem.
 

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still shedding season
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gnarSKYLER said:
I've never fallen with my clipless.
You know what's going to happen next time you ride, right? :)

I've only been riding for a year but wouldn't want to be without clipless pedals/shoes. Actually I haven't fallen either, but years ago I got used to the idea with toe clips & straps. It's just a matter of getting used to having to do something to set your foot down and becomes a reflex.
 

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Not a rocket surgeon.
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Get the shoes and fall down to get it over with. I only fell once a few years ago. I had spent about 2 hours and 35 miles clipped in and just forgot. Blamo on the ground. What a tool. If you learn it will only happen once.
 

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Agreed

I'll just echo what everyone else has already said.
Get the shoes.
As for what brand, that is really hard to say I think that they are all good, don't buy them online find a good shop that has a decent selection and find one that feels comfortable to you. don't let anyone talk you into buying a pair that doesn't feel right.
Over the years I have tried various brands and I have found that some just don't work for me even though some of my riding buddies swear by them.
For pedels I'd recommend the Crank Brothers candy, they have a nice platform and a esay in/out mechanism.
I'd also ask the shop to set you up on trainer and let you practice cliping and unclipng a bit before you hit the road.
Keep us posted
 

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Boobies!
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+1 on shoes and pedals--if your cadence is right & you're riding at 85%, your heart will take care of itself...

to add some zing, do some intervals--flat out sprint for next marker, ease up, ride 85% & wait for your heart beat to drop--then do it again! How do you think we managed in the "olden" pre-monitor days???:D
 

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John Nelson said:
In my opinion, if you're never going to race or ride in fast groups, you have no use for a heart rate monitor.

I don't agree with that at all a heart rate monitor is a great tool for keeping you in your zones. It also is great to track your progress and Cal burn as well. I highly recommend heart rate monitors and training with them. Lastly don't waste your money on a cheap one.
 

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Perceived effort

Kevin_in_SB said:
I don't agree with that at all a heart rate monitor is a great tool for keeping you in your zones. It also is great to track your progress and Cal burn as well. I highly recommend heart rate monitors and training with them. Lastly don't waste your money on a cheap one.
You can pretty easily "know your zones" by just being self-aware. Besides, I never saw the OP say that he was heavy into training. Here's a useful guide:

Recovery: I can SING!
Endurance: I can talk easily
Tempo: I can talk
Hard tempo: I . . . can . . . talk
Time trial: (pant) (pant) (pant)

You don't need much more than this unless you want to get quite serious.
 

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I am like everyone else...get your shoes and pedals. You can learn to ride more "efficiently" w/clipless than you ever could with straps. Learn to pedal correctly and develop a good spinning style. Once you have that, a heart rate monitor is an extra "toy", but don't get me wrong since it can be a very useful tool to help you establish a good program.

Good luck.
 
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