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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, I need help!! I just started useing a HR monitor with a training program. I have been training without a HR Monitor or a training program. I just get on my bike and ride, I let my body tell me how it feels.

I am useing Lance Armstrongs book and I set the Gen. zones according to how it said to do (220 minus my age). I had to do a workout to day that was 2 hrs long w/ 3 intervels during the ride. The problem was I had to be in zone 2 for about 90% of the ride. For me that is 111 bpm -130 bpm. I normaly go out on a 40 mile ride and (I DONT FEEL LIKE IM PUSHING) and I avg about 19-20 mph. Today 1 had to ride at about 15 mph to keep in my zone range:mad2: . and tomorrow I have to ride in zone 1 (93bpm-110bpm) for 45 min:cryin: .

My question is, is this normal?:confused: tomorrow ill have to ride like 10mph to keep in that zone range!!!! Will I start to get faster if I keep on the program? I dont know how this is to help?
I dont understand how riding on my bike at 10mph will make my faster. Why get on at alll!!!! why not just call it as a day off!

Could somone shed som light on how this all works.
 

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The training program is correct. It sounds like it has you doing long slow distance rides. These types of rides are typically done in the off season, during winter. Doing lots of mileage in zone 2 and zone 1 increases your ability to ride for long distances, and gives you a "base" to build on top of when you start doing speed work, such as sprints and high tempo intervals. By going slow now, you will actually be able to go faster later.

So yes, you should be going slowly during base building. You should feel like you are not working at all.

However, if you want to race, you are doing these types of rides at the wrong time of the year. You'd be better off skipping to the part of the training program that concentrates on "in season" fitness, and then returning to the base building section this winter.

EDIT:

I should add that z2 rides can be terribly boring if you're doing the same old routes every time. Use this opportunity to explore new roads and new places. Since the goal is long rides, it's okay to get lost (as long as you have enough food and fluids.... which you should anyway).
 

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Impulse Athletic Coaching
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crispy010 said:
The training program is correct. It sounds like it has you doing long slow distance rides. These types of rides are typically done in the off season, during winter. Doing lots of mileage in zone 2 and zone 1 increases your ability to ride for long distances, and gives you a "base" to build on top of when you start doing speed work, such as sprints and high tempo intervals. By going slow now, you will actually be able to go faster later.

So yes, you should be going slowly during base building. You should feel like you are not working at all.

However, if you want to race, you are doing these types of rides at the wrong time of the year. You'd be better off skipping to the part of the training program that concentrates on "in season" fitness, and then returning to the base building section this winter.

EDIT:

I should add that z2 rides can be terribly boring if you're doing the same old routes every time. Use this opportunity to explore new roads and new places. Since the goal is long rides, it's okay to get lost (as long as you have enough food and fluids.... which you should anyway).
No. No. No. No. No.

Slow rides will make you better at going slow. If you are buying a book forwarded by lance armstrong and using a HR monitor to train, I assume this is not your goal.

Here, read this thread. I included my own HR ranges in order to be in the "sweet spot." I would also join a weekly group ride. You may not be able to keep up at first, but being pushed to go further and faster will make you a strong rider.

http://forums.roadbikereview.com/showthread.php?t=112091&highlight=building+a+powerful+aerobic

Unless you have 30hrs/wk to train, skip the "slow" rides. They aren't doing anything for you. Hell, even if you did train 30hrs/wk, "slow" is not your goal.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Ok!!! Now im lost!!!! I have been putting in LOTS of base miles on my own over the past few months, but i have not been doing any intervels or speed work. I have been racing my mtn bike a fair amount and have been doing good but not as good as I would like. Most of my training has been on the road and I was told by a few guys I know who are cat 2-3 riders that im fast but I need to get on a plan and start useing a HR moniror. I still have a few big races coming up, so where do I start. I am new to all of this, is there a better book out there that would give me a better program?
 

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9-18 Fast said:
Ok!!! Now im lost!!!! I have been putting in LOTS of base miles on my own over the past few months, but i have not been doing any intervels or speed work. I have been racing my mtn bike a fair amount and have been doing good but not as good as I would like. Most of my training has been on the road and I was told by a few guys I know who are cat 2-3 riders that im fast but I need to get on a plan and start useing a HR moniror. I still have a few big races coming up, so where do I start. I am new to all of this, is there a better book out there that would give me a better program?
It depends when your big races are and which ones have the highest priority. If you're looking to peak in mid/late July, now is the time to start a "build" phase in your training. Then, work on anaerobic capacity, taper, and peak. Training with a HR monitor is difficult, as everyone's zones are different and calculating zones is even more difficult.

Build: 1 VO2max interval workout/wk (5x5min @ 110% threshold -- ~92-93% of your HRmax), 1 threshold workout/wk, 4 SST rides/wk with 1 being at the upper end of threshold, and 1 recovery day. Should last for 5-6wks.

Anaerobic: 2-3 days/wk of anaerobic workouts -- 8-10x1min, 8-10x30sec intervals, etc, 2 SST rides/wk. Should last for ~3wks.

Taper/peak: take ~7 days before your big races to reduce volume (ie, no more 3-4+hr rides) and vastly increase intensity. Ride every day that you normally do, just cut the volume.

Don't forget to rest. Work hard, rest hard.
 

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iliveonnitro said:
No. No. No. No. No.

Slow rides will make you better at going slow. If you are buying a book forwarded by lance armstrong and using a HR monitor to train, I assume this is not your goal.

Here, read this thread. I included my own HR ranges in order to be in the "sweet spot." I would also join a weekly group ride. You may not be able to keep up at first, but being pushed to go further and faster will make you a strong rider.

http://forums.roadbikereview.com/showthread.php?t=112091&highlight=building+a+powerful+aerobic

Unless you have 30hrs/wk to train, skip the "slow" rides. They aren't doing anything for you. Hell, even if you did train 30hrs/wk, "slow" is not your goal.
Yep, I couldn't agree more with EVERYTHING here..+1 :thumbsup:
and a great op to show my new sig :D
 

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crispy010 said:
So yes, you should be going slowly during base building. You should feel like you are not working at all.
Do we still have people believing this tripe? LOL

9-18 Fast:
If using a HRM to help guide training, then at least determine what your actual HR Max is (at least close enough) so that the HR levels might actually make more sense. generic HR forumla are a poor guide for setting training.

Sweet spot training is good stuff, helps to build up to it a bit so that it can become a large proportion of one's training diet.
 
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