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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am relatively new to the sport and I bought a HRM about 2 months ago. When I am riding it will say that my HR is anywhere from 80-90% of my max. All the info I have gathered would say this is bad to be riding at this heart rate the whole time. My problem is that the heart rate monitor is saying my HR is high but I am not breathing hard and my legs are not tired. If I drop my heart rate into the 75% range I feel like I am getting nothing out of my training ride.

Also after my ride I can be whipped, my legs are dead and I can barely walk, but the next morning I am not sore. I could do the worst ride and feel it in my legs after but the next mornin I have no soreness at all. Does anyone else get this or is it just me.
 

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Max. heartrate

How does the heartrate monitor know what your max. heartrate is? Max. heartrate is highly individual, so the only way a heartrate monitor can know your personal max. heartrate is if you tell it. If the heartrate monitor isn't set for your own personal max. heartrate, then the displayed % max. is meaningless.

If you read the instruction manual, there is likely a section on how to set max. heartrate, and probably includes instructions on how you can perform a test to find your max. heartrate. Or, you can do a little quick research on the web to find methods to test yourself for max. heartrate, and input that value.
 

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Genitive Declensioner
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rider22 said:
I am relatively new to the sport and I bought a HRM about 2 months ago. When I am riding it will say that my HR is anywhere from 80-90% of my max. All the info I have gathered would say this is bad to be riding at this heart rate the whole time. My problem is that the heart rate monitor is saying my HR is high but I am not breathing hard and my legs are not tired. If I drop my heart rate into the 75% range I feel like I am getting nothing out of my training ride.
Max HR unless you've actually measured your own are useless.

If you are training using a HRM then figuring out your Lactate Threshold and basing your workouts around them will be much more meaningfull. A fairly effective LT measurement is to do a 30' all out TT. 10' into the ride hit the lap button. Your ave HR for the last 20' will be your LT, HR zones can then be calculated from this number. Joe Friel training bible goes into all the details.....
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
thanks

I will do this and find out. I set the HRM for my max but it uses the 220-age formula so its going to be off.
 

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rider22 said:
I am relatively new to the sport and I bought a HRM about 2 months ago. When I am riding it will say that my HR is anywhere from 80-90% of my max. All the info I have gathered would say this is bad to be riding at this heart rate the whole time. My problem is that the heart rate monitor is saying my HR is high but I am not breathing hard and my legs are not tired. If I drop my heart rate into the 75% range I feel like I am getting nothing out of my training ride.

Also after my ride I can be whipped, my legs are dead and I can barely walk, but the next morning I am not sore. I could do the worst ride and feel it in my legs after but the next mornin I have no soreness at all. Does anyone else get this or is it just me.
I know what you mean about the legs. I have only been riding for a few months and on my longest ride, although only a meager 38 miles it was over 50% longer than my previous best of 24 miles, and my legs were killing me for about 90 minutes after I got off the bike. I expected the worst the next day and nothing!!! I think it has to do with our ability/sense to keep just under the lactic acid buildup stage through higher cadence and less "mashing". Wiped afterwards, but not sore, What a great sport!!!
 

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220- age is useless.......

rider22 said:
I will do this and find out. I set the HRM for my max but it uses the 220-age formula so its going to be off.
I'm 50 years old....the fromula would say my max is 170. I have observed, in the last year a Max of 198...my real max is higher than this. As svend says, Max is highly individual.

Lactate Threshold on the other hand is trainable....the better shape you get in, the higher your LT. Setting Training zones against LT, and remeasuring periodically is a great way of maximizing your training. The 30 minute TT is a good way.

BTW, my LT is 181 currently ....compare that to the formula.

Len
 

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From everything I have read about heart rate monitors, they are unreliable at best. Polar brand are supposedly more accurate than others. They claim that all the competition takes readings every 7 seconds and multiplies accordingly. They claim that theirs is the only product that counts every beat. Meanwhile, I checked out Consumer Reports last year and as a result decided against buying one altogether. If you are training seriously and want these numbers, that's one thing. If you are a general health/fitness enthusiast just wanting to get a good workout, they are overkill. You'd be better off checking your heartrate while using good fitness equipment at a gym only for the purpose of getting your "feel" for various exertion levels.
 

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I don't agree..........

festusbodine said:
From everything I have read about heart rate monitors, they are unreliable at best. Polar brand are supposedly more accurate than others. They claim that all the competition takes readings every 7 seconds and multiplies accordingly. They claim that theirs is the only product that counts every beat. Meanwhile, I checked out Consumer Reports last year and as a result decided against buying one altogether. If you are training seriously and want these numbers, that's one thing. If you are a general health/fitness enthusiast just wanting to get a good workout, they are overkill. You'd be better off checking your heartrate while using good fitness equipment at a gym only for the purpose of getting your "feel" for various exertion levels.
not even a little bit.

I think that any Heart rate monitor, because it is always measuring the same way, is a great indicator of relative effort....My HR is X I am exerting this much effort, I increase my effort, My HR goes to Y...It is not as important how accurate it is as how consisitant it is.

I would recommend a HR monitor for any new rider. Feedback about perceived effort vs HR gives a rider a great understanding, over time, of how his body reacts to stress. It also let's the rider know things like whether or not they are getting enough rest etc....

Anyone preparing for an event can benefit from HR feedback.

Len
 

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The Right Wing
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Don't believe all you read (not even this!)

Even the cheapest HRM's will give you a hospital-accurate heart rate. It is just too easy a measurement to get wrong.

I agree with Len, that most novices excercisers can really benefit from knowing how hard is hard enough.
 

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53T said:
Don't believe all you read (not even this!)

Even the cheapest HRM's will give you a hospital-accurate heart rate. It is just too easy a measurement to get wrong.


True that.
As someone who works in a hospital reapairing this equipment I have the knowledge to back it up.
We actually have a dialysis machine that uses not only Polar's technology to monitor and adjust bio-feedback, but also uses a standard Polar chest strap. It is as good as any ECG machine for recording beats, and is used clinically in many applications.
 
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