Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have been riding for two years now and I think its time to get new wheels. I am a heavier rider (220lb not fat but muscle). I am riding a Ritchey Pro Deep Section wheel set with DT bladed spokes and I am having constant trouble with keeping them true and quiet (the bearings are terrible). I have been shopping around for a while now and I was wondering if anyone could give me some advice on a stiff and light wheel set. I ride about 7 hours a week and I also train at a practice 1k pr lap course. I am more of an aggressive rider due to my size and strength so I need something responsive and stiff. A lot of people recommend the Ksyriums but I would like to know if anyone has any other suggestions before I spend the money. My $$ is up to 600 for the pair.

Thank You
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
234 Posts
Depends on $$, your use of the wheels...

There is quite a range available. Many of the more expensive wheels are not ideal for someone of your size, riding aggressively on bad roads. Lower spoke counts are not your friend.

A specific recommendation: I am pretty big too, and I have had good experiences with a couple of inexpensive, solid, reasonably light wheels, built with Shimano or Campy.
Mavic CXP-33 rims, 32° or 36°, 14/15 spokes
Velocity Deep-V rims, 32° or 36°, 14/15 spokes
Velocity Fusion rims, 32° or 36°, 14/15 spokes
 

·
What the Hell is going on
Joined
·
5,143 Posts
Bombproof Wheels

Greetings Raz,
I posted this elsewhere on RBR. Here's my suggestion. I'm 6'2" and 230lbs. (and losing). I build all my wheels and the most dependable, solid, and durable set of wheels I have are 32 hole Velocity Deep V rims on Ultegra hubs laced 3x using 14g DT spokes. I don't race as much as I should but I go on weekly club rides. In the past 5 years this wheelset has seen a lot of hard riding and it still spins straight and true.
__________________
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,103 Posts
The recommendations given so far are good. Some poopoo the Deep Vs because they are on the heavy side... but on all but the steepest hills their aero advantage more than compensates for the extra weight. They come in pretty colors too, if you are into that. Similar rims can be had from other manufacturers, though... like the Sun Swift for instance.

I'd recommend 32/36 on the spokes too, but I'd go with light spokes (2.0/1.5mm) on all but the drive side rear. They should actually last longer than heavier spokes. You could instead use aero spokes like AE15s or CX-rays for a little aero boost. On the drive-rear use 2.3/1.8 or 2.0/1.7 spokes to make it easier to get high tension.

For a Shimano bike, Ultegra or Dura Ace hubs are hard to beat for the price.

Most importantly though... get a good builder! It will make all the difference. There are a lot of little details that go into a good wheel build and too many of the wheels for sale have just been thrown together
 

·
wheelbuilder
Joined
·
2,220 Posts
rruff said:
The recommendations given so far are good. Some poopoo the Deep Vs because they are on the heavy side... but on all but the steepest hills their aero advantage more than compensates for the extra weight. They come in pretty colors too, if you are into that. Similar rims can be had from other manufacturers, though... like the Sun Swift for instance.

I'd recommend 32/36 on the spokes too, but I'd go with light spokes (2.0/1.5mm) on all but the drive side rear. They should actually last longer than heavier spokes. You could instead use aero spokes like AE15s or CX-rays for a little aero boost. On the drive-rear use 2.3/1.8 or 2.0/1.7 spokes to make it easier to get high tension.

For a Shimano bike, Ultegra or Dura Ace hubs are hard to beat for the price.

Most importantly though... get a good builder! It will make all the difference. There are a lot of little details that go into a good wheel build and too many of the wheels for sale have just been thrown together

What he said.

-Eric
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
Deep V Build

You can get Deep V rims and also a new superlight hubset Velocity now has thats only 286g, and less than Dura Ace, and about the same as Ultegra in price. A Dura Ace 7800 hubset is 393g and the Ultegra tips the scales at 487g! The complete set like you'd need with the new superlight velocity hubset would only be $425 or so at superspokes.com. At least that the quote I have for them from superspokes. I'm getting some in a 32/36 Deep V or Fusion rim. Tuff and Light, how I like it. They carry all of Velcoity's stuff.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,103 Posts
FAST2U said:
You can get Deep V rims and also a new superlight hubset Velocity now has thats only 286g, and less than Dura Ace, and about the same as Ultegra in price.
Those hubs are very light, but they charge $280 for them... you could get Dura Ace for that; or the White H1s for $20 more... but they also sell a wheelset with Aerohead rims and Laser spokes for $388, which is a great deal. Maybe they'd sub Deep V rims?

I'd have to question those hubs reliability though... don't know if the OP would want to screw around with the bearings like on the Ritchey hubs.

I'd also want to get them "tuned" by a good builder before riding them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
543 Posts
I'm a 210 rider who is basically a masher and I was looking for what your are. After a lot of internet research I settled on Velocity Nubians (I think that is the model). Anyway they have the Areohead Rims with Velocity Hubs (made by Formula for them). But instead of going with the standard spokes I went with titanium to save weight since I needed a high spoke count. After a few emails back and fourth they made them with 28 spokes in the front and 32 in the back. So far the wheels are holding up well after about 1000 miles. At about the 100 mile mark the wheels needed a slight true and have been fine for the last 900 miles. They came in at 1515 grams and cost $375 before shipping. I couldn't beat that price/weight ratio anywhere I looked. My concern was how they would hold up and so far so good. I was also concerned if I broke a spoke I would have to lose the wheels for a couple of weeks because they offer to fix the wheels for free. But when I voiced this concern to them they sent me 2wo spokes each of the 2wo they used in the build for the LBS to use if and when I need them. One downside of these wheels if you are looking for bling they aint them. But on my club rides they seem to roll better than those fancy wheels costing 2X as much.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
168 Posts
velocity neuvian's

i'm also on the lookout for good wheels for the 220lb rider. i too have settled on the velocity line for their good reputation and great prices. so far we've seen posts about the deep V's and aerohead rims and i have to ask...
aside from the difference in rim profile is one rim stronger or better for larger riders than the other?
for those shopping as well spin lite cycling has velocity neuvian, deep V and fusion wheelsets in shimano and campy for $269 and $277 respectively.
http://www.spinlitecycling.com/road_wheels.htm#Velocity
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
213 Posts
Im 215lbs and capable of putting some power through the wheels. I have 2005 Campag Eurus' and even on the bad roads of Sydney, they have been perfect. Still perfectly true. 2 punctures in several thousand kms.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
498 Posts
So, for a 220 guy, the best answer is souding like 32 spoke wheels of some sort, ideally with a pretty solid rim ... deep section or similar.

How light do people think someone would have to be to run Ksyriums (as everyday wheels or everyday roads, and lasting a long time) ? Would a 180 lb rider get away with Ksyrium ES wheels for this? Would a 200lb be okay? Anyone got experience?

-Chris

PS Im 180 lb, and run 32 spoke 105 wheels, and have a new set of Chris Kings ready to replace them .... but Ksyrium ES's are just so beautiful ...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
234 Posts
I think that if you do a search...

you will find many satisfied Ksyrium owners of various weights, some big guys. I don't think that there is a recommended weight--at least I have never heard of that.

In that search you will find a few who have had failures. I don't think the failure rate was high, and remember you can find failures in many different types and makes of wheels. I have gotten the impression that the Maxtal alloy that Mavic uses is--for lack of a better word--comparitively brittle (of course one could say that about most aluminum bike parts in comparison to steel). I remember reading that some of the rim failures show cracks around the eyelets. Whether this is due to overtensioning and/or careless use, I cannot say. I use Mavic rims and they have performed well for me, no failures. I rode entry-level Mavics for many years and many thousands of miles, with no rim failures or minor problems at all.

StillKeen said:
So, for a 220 guy, the best answer is souding like 32 spoke wheels of some sort, ideally with a pretty solid rim ... deep section or similar.
How light do people think someone would have to be to run Ksyriums (as everyday wheels or everyday roads, and lasting a long time) ? Would a 180 lb rider get away with Ksyrium ES wheels for this? Would a 200lb be okay? Anyone got experience?

-Chris

PS Im 180 lb, and run 32 spoke 105 wheels, and have a new set of Chris Kings ready to replace them .... but Ksyrium ES's are just so beautiful ...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
273 Posts
open pro/ dace 7800

I am 250 - pretty strong - for 300 bucks at performance d ace 7800 hubs wth 32 hole open pro rims db spokes with brass nipples. Super wheels like them more than my K's- look for 10% or double point weekend - amazing value and performance.

Do not get alloy nipples - they do not have the pullout strength that brass does - had a pair of odds and endos(speedcific with dtr1.1 rims) had to replace the nipples on the rear wheel - Mike Garcis did not even return my call!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,103 Posts
bigman said:
Do not get alloy nipples - they do not have the pullout strength that brass does - had a pair of odds and endos(speedcific with dtr1.1 rims) had to replace the nipples on the rear wheel
I'm curious about what actually happened there... would you like to elaborate? Did the nipples break? Did it happen when you were trying to turn them? Were they aluminum on the drive side?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
376 Posts
I ridden both and like the Aeroheads

jhenry4 said:
i'm also on the lookout for good wheels for the 220lb rider. i too have settled on the velocity line for their good reputation and great prices. so far we've seen posts about the deep V's and aerohead rims and i have to ask...
aside from the difference in rim profile is one rim stronger or better for larger riders than the other?
for those shopping as well spin lite cycling has velocity neuvian, deep V and fusion wheelsets in shimano and campy for $269 and $277 respectively.
http://www.spinlitecycling.com/road_wheels.htm#Velocity
I'm 6'5", 240lbs (but coming down) and it is plenty hilly where I live. Deep Vs will always be stronger due to the higher profile, beefier rim. However, my most recent wheels (built by Mike Garcia at www.oddsandendos.com) are Velocity Aeroheads, 32h front and rear, with the OC rear rim. VERY sturdy wheels so far. I did spring the bigger bucks and get DT Swiss 240s hubs, but Mike makes the same basic wheels with SpeedCific hubs for right about $300. Never ridden these, but the reviews seem to match up to the Formula/Velocity hubs. I have the wheels with black spokes and nipples. Looks very stealth on my Ti Seven. About 300 miles on them so far (just got them) and absolutely zero issues.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
273 Posts
Alloy nipples

Spokes pulled out of the rear wheel alloy nipples - I beleive it was the non drive side but I could be mistaken. The threads on the alloy nipples are weaker than on brass nipples.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
"How light do people think someone would have to be to run Ksyriums (as everyday wheels or everyday roads, and lasting a long time) ? Would a 180 lb rider get away with Ksyrium ES wheels for this? Would a 200lb be okay? Anyone got experience?"

180 is big for bike compenents, especially wheels. If youre riding moderately paced centuries on nice roads you should be ok (i.e. youre easy on wheels). If youre 180 and racing or doing hard group rides (lots of sprinting, hammering), especially over rough roads, I dont think any light boutique wheels will be durable for you.

My philosophy on wheels is to train on good durable wheels with easily replacable parts (CXP 33 rim with hub of your choice is stiff and strong), and race on something better than a Ksyrium (carbon rimed tubies, zipp, campy, reynolds, etc).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
106 Posts
I ride Ksyrium SSC SL I am 6'-4" 225 lbs. and 10% body fat I have had no problems with the rims. Also got Vredestien Tricomp tires and they are awesome very fast.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
"180 is big for bike compenents, especially wheels. If youre riding moderately paced centuries on nice roads you should be ok (i.e. youre easy on wheels). If youre 180 and racing or doing hard group rides (lots of sprinting, hammering), especially over rough roads, I dont think any light boutique wheels will be durable for you"......Man....I don't know about that.

Consider a 59 or 61 frame. Do you really think that somebody that can fit on a 61 is going to weigh 140??? By the way, I weigh 210, and by your definiton would break a low spoke wheelset. I've been riding my 20Front/24 paired rear for 12k rough NH road miles and have not had to true the wheels once....
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top