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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm having not-so-good luck trying to find a set of wheels. Here are my criteria:

1) I'm so close to 200lbs., you could hardly slide a piece of paper in there;
2) my bike is a steel Bianchi that really does have 130mm spacing;
3) it also has friction shifting, so I realize that with a different chain, I probably could easily accommodate 8 cogs or perhaps more, which I also want to do;
4) must be Campy-compatible.

Another correspondent suggested I try Khamsin, because money, unfortunately, is a factor; but I saw an ad for a Eurus set that I like, because it seems to be a better wheel, and for $250 used.

Input? Am I on the right track, or still barking up the wrong tree?
 

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I should also say my budget is $600 max.
For $600 you could put together a very solid wheel based on Campy Record hubs. Something like a Velocity A23 rim and double butted spokes. This would be 32 spoke and if properly built should be durable under your weight. Factory wheels tend to be lower in value than purpose built.
 

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I'm having not-so-good luck trying to find a set of wheels. Here are my criteria:

1) I'm so close to 200lbs., you could hardly slide a piece of paper in there;
2) my bike is a steel Bianchi that really does have 130mm spacing;
3) it also has friction shifting, so I realize that with a different chain, I probably could easily accommodate 8 cogs or perhaps more, which I also want to do;
4) must be Campy-compatible.

Another correspondent suggested I try Khamsin, because money, unfortunately, is a factor; but I saw an ad for a Eurus set that I like, because it seems to be a better wheel, and for $250 used.

Input? Am I on the right track, or still barking up the wrong tree?
I'm the same weight and probably have a very similar bike. When I was much younger and 20 lbs lighter, I eventually ruined the rear wheel (Ambrosio box rim) and it was replaced with a similar-looking Shimano (with a 7 cog freewheel) that has been fine to this day. You should be able to get a decent set of new wheels to meet your criteria. Go for good hubs and rims, and 32 spokes in the rear. Keep in mind with the 130mm spacing, the more cogs, the more dish, and the less stable the wheel.
 

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I'm having not-so-good luck trying to find a set of wheels. Here are my criteria:

1) I'm so close to 200lbs., you could hardly slide a piece of paper in there;
2) my bike is a steel Bianchi that really does have 130mm spacing;
3) it also has friction shifting, so I realize that with a different chain, I probably could easily accommodate 8 cogs or perhaps more, which I also want to do;
4) must be Campy-compatible.

Another correspondent suggested I try Khamsin, because money, unfortunately, is a factor; but I saw an ad for a Eurus set that I like, because it seems to be a better wheel, and for $250 used.

Input? Am I on the right track, or still barking up the wrong tree?
If it was me I would buy a brand new set of Zonda for the same money as the used Eurus and never look back. Best bang for the buck these Zondas are ...
 

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Spoke count: 16 (front), 21 (rear)
Is this a good idea for those of us nearly 200 lbs?
 

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Is this a good idea for those of us nearly 200 lbs?
It depends on the type of spokes used. If the spokes used are the conventional steel spokes used by wheel builders then no; a wheel built like that won't last long.
If the spokes used are the type you find on Campy Zonda, Mavic Ksyrium or Fulcrum Racing then I would not be too concerned. Apples to cucumbers really.
 

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It depends on the type of spokes used. If the spokes used are the conventional steel spokes used by wheel builders then no; a wheel built like that won't last long.
If the spokes used are the type you find on Campy Zonda, Mavic Ksyrium or Fulcrum Racing then I would not be too concerned. Apples to cucumbers really.

Hmmm. The thing that concerns me most about the Zonda wheels are the triple spoke configuration on the rear wheel. Obviously done for no other reason than some bling, my guess is these less than equal stresses on the rim would shorten its life.

DCGriz, I don't know if you have owned these and have any anecdotal evidence of their durability. I am certainly curious.
 

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Hmmm. The thing that concerns me most about the Zonda wheels are the triple spoke configuration on the rear wheel. Obviously done for no other reason than some bling, my guess is these less than equal stresses on the rim would shorten its life.

DCGriz, I don't know if you have owned these and have any anecdotal evidence of their durability. I am certainly curious.
Rest assured they will hold a 200 lbs person just fine.
 

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Rest assured they will hold a 200 lbs person just fine.
OK. But the question is, how many miles will they last? I guess it's possible that the rims are overbuilt to the point that my concern is a non-issue?
 

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OK. But the question is, how many miles will they last? I guess it's possible that the rims are overbuilt to the point that my concern is a non-issue?
There is no answer to your questions the way you phrased them. Generally or rather empirically, if a wheel lasts the first 1000 miles without any truing needed then it will last for a while longer. Exercising some care and looking where you are going usually helps extend the time interval.

All of the wheels I mentioned earlier are robust enough for a 200 lber. They do have fewer spokes but, thickness wise, each of their spokes counts for at least two of the conventional spokes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I've looked at the Zondas, as well as Ksyrium (and even the Aksium seems o.k. for what appears to be basically an entry-level wheel, but....), and like very much what I see, but Fulcrum hadn't really occurred to me; thanks for the additional tip, griz.

My main concern is that of staying true under my weight, while I ride some of it off. I have a Lemond with a 20-spoke front wheel (doesn't look stock--it's a Craigslist bike) that I had to get trued about every 6-8 months, until I stopped riding it in favor of my two newer purchases. But it seems to me that if I remain determined & somewhat disciplined about getting out and cranking the pedals, eventually the issue will become moot due to better fitness/lighter weight. But in the meantime,.... Fortunately, here in Portland there are a plethora of shops and builders to choose from; in fact, it's almost an embarrassment of riches. Do I just walk the bike in someplace and say "This is my problem; wanna give me an estimate?", or what?
 

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All of the wheels I mentioned earlier are robust enough for a 200 lber. They do have fewer spokes but, thickness wise, each of their spokes counts for at least two of the conventional spokes.
DC, your point is well taken about thicker spokes allowing use of fewer of them as far as preventing spoke breakage. However, doesn't fewer spokes mean greater pulling forces on existing spokes and therefore greater stresses on the rim itself making it more prone to cracking? I think that would not have anything to do with spoke gauge.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I should add that I also want to put an updated Campy gruppo on the bike, too. I'm currently looking hard at Athena, which I could get with the Zondas from Ribble UK for a total of just over $725, which seems a terrific deal, and a lot less than I expected to have to shell out for both group and wheels--and not that much more than I budgeted for the wheels alone.

However, the question remains of spacing: will it work with 1300mm spacing, given that the Athena is 11-speed, or will I need to drop down to Veloce 10-speed? Or am I still off the mark?
 

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The 130mm spacing should not be a concern. Either of the 9/10 s or 10/11 s hubs will be fine as long they are 130 OLD. The extra spacing for the 11th cog is absorbed by the 11s hub flange offset. The 11s hub could fit either 10 or 11 cogs but the 10s hub can not fit 11 cogs.
 

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Hmmm. The thing that concerns me most about the Zonda wheels are the triple spoke configuration on the rear wheel. Obviously done for no other reason than some bling, my guess is these less than equal stresses on the rim would shorten its life.

DCGriz, I don't know if you have owned these and have any anecdotal evidence of their durability. I am certainly curious.
I'm 185lbs and put about 10,000 miles on a set of Fulcrum Racing 3's and never had a problem. 16front/21rear
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Thanks, griz, but I'm afraid I don't know what you're referring to by OLD (as I said elsewhere, my learning curve is still HC). My assumption at this point is that if I were to go the route of the Zondas with an 11-speed Athena gruppo, I'd be all right--assuming I use it all enough to stay out of the doghouse with my wife [who's really quite lovely about my love of cycling, actually :)].
 

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Thanks, griz, but I'm afraid I don't know what you're referring to by OLD (as I said elsewhere, my learning curve is still HC). My assumption at this point is that if I were to go the route of the Zondas with an 11-speed Athena gruppo, I'd be all right--assuming I use it all enough to stay out of the doghouse with my wife [who's really quite lovely about my love of cycling, actually :)].
Over-Locknut-Dimension

Sheldon Brown's Bicycle Glossary N - O
 
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