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Being a clyde I'm looking at these rims with Dura Ace 9000 hubs for a build. Which rim would you go with and why?
 

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Why is this even a question? The HED is lighter, wider, tubeless compatible, and known to be a high quality rim. If cost is no object (I'm assuming it's not since you're asking the question) then the answer should be clear.
 

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Why is this even a question? The HED is lighter, wider, tubeless compatible, and known to be a high quality rim. If cost is no object (I'm assuming it's not since you're asking the question) then the answer should be clear.
Not clear to me. They guy said he's a clyde (who knows that that really means though) so the heavier Mavic rim might be a better choice for durability and the Hed's cost twice as much.
 

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I have both. The HED Belgium+ where originally built as backups to my Campag Eurus wheels but have become my goto wheels. The CXP33 wheels (which had been the backups) have been relegated to commuter duty. Both the CXP33 and HED wheels are builtup as 32 spoke 3X on Campag hubs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Durability is my only concern nor is price! True clyde here 6'4" @ 220 to 235lbs depending on the time of year.
 

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I'd pick the HED's all day long. If they're well-built wheels, they won't give you any issues. Plus, the machined braking surfaces gives better braking performance*.
I have a set on my roadie, and love them. I almost wish I went with DT Swiss hubs over the Chris King, as you don't need an expensive tool to maintain them.

*Yes, I'm not sure if Mavic machines their surface like HED does, and if they do, my choice would still be the HED's. Wider rim gives a better ride too!
 

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The HED is wider and taller than the Mavic. This makes it laterally and radially stiffer than the Mavic and a better choice under the weight of a heavier rider; spoke count being the same for either rim.
Although the Mavic has an apparent thicker extrusion ( because of same weight as the HED but less surface area), the HED has been proven adequate for heavy duty applications such as cyclocross and thus robust enough to support a heavier rider.
The HED has been consistently found to be of higher quality and it would be my recommendation over the CXP33, cost aside.
 

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I'd pick the HED's all day long. If they're well-built wheels, they won't give you any issues. Plus, the machined braking surfaces gives better braking performance*.
I have a set on my roadie, and love them. I almost wish I went with DT Swiss hubs over the Chris King, as you don't need an expensive tool to maintain them.

*Yes, I'm not sure if Mavic machines their surface like HED does, and if they do, my choice would still be the HED's. Wider rim gives a better ride too!
You don't need an expensive tool to maintain or service Chris King hubs. Why is this misinformation so often repeated on cycling message boards?
Belgium plus each and every day, all day long. Seriously great rims.
 

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Not for lubing but for removal/reinstalation of the press-fit parts you do need their $188 tool
Serious question. How often is this really needed? I feel like I've read some people say they've put 10 or 20K+ on CK hubs without ever having to do this. I am considering CK hubs for my next build (whenever that may be), just to get the Navy hubs to match my headset.

I tend to look at things I want through rose colored glasses sometimes. So wondering what the real deal is.

thanks
cmn
 

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Serious question. How often is this really needed? I feel like I've read some people say they've put 10 or 20K+ on CK hubs without ever having to do this. I am considering CK hubs for my next build (whenever that may be), just to get the Navy hubs to match my headset.

I tend to look at things I want through rose colored glasses sometimes. So wondering what the real deal is.

thanks
cmn
That's a good question but one without a definitive answer. Although the official CK recommended interval of taking the hub Ring Drive (and all the press-fit pieces) apart for cleaning and inspection is every one to two years, I have not found this to be an absolute requirement IF frequent lubing of the gears, bearing races, O rings and inspection/replacement of the bearing seals is diligently done.

What I do every 4 months to 6 months is what CK identifies as the Basic Service. Clean the helical drive, shafts, O rings, etc and inspect for integrity. Remove the snap ring from the bearings and remove the rubber seals. Flush out old grease. Lube the drive with 10w oil, lube the rubber O rings with Triflow and grease the bearing races with Ring Drive grease. Reinstall the seals if they look intact, replace them if not. Set the preset and it's done. Sounds cumbersome but after you do it a few times it takes about 30 to 45 minutes for both wheels.

I have two wheelsets with R45s which I rotate with the rest of my wheels depending on mood and the particular ride. Because of this I am not sure on the exact mileage on the King hubs but it's safe to say, it's between 3000 and 6000 miles. Never had an indication so far of the need to take the entire hub apart; I did replace the seals on three of the bearings though; mostly because of my fault, causing a small tear trying to remove the lock ring.

Another aspect to consider is how often you ride in the rain; the more you do the more frequent the Basic lubing/inspection needs to be to assure that the hub internals are properly maintained.

I hope it helps. The R45s are marvelously engineered hubs and with proper maintainance will last a very long time. Are they better than Dura-ace or the other top shelf hubs? I don't believe function wise the differences are paramount. Mine are 10s and the primary reason I bought them was because of their flange offsets which at the time were close to the best I could find. If you end up getting them, consider also buying the preload adjustment tool; it makes the adjustment easier.
 

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The CK hubs should go much longer than recommended before needing service, it's just that I'm trying to do all of my servicing without going to a shop, and want to have the tools ahead of time.
That being said, the prices now between the CK and the DT Swiss 240's is very close. Both have similar ratchet mechanisms. The big down side to the DT Swiss now is lack of color choices, if that's important.
 

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I have three sets of Belgium Plus wheels. Two are the standard Chris King R45/R45D wheelset sold on the Chris King website. The other is a pair of DT Swiss 350 Disc/Thru Axle on a new gravel bike.

As a Clyde (6' 5" 240lbs). I can't say enough good things about them.

Of course, as with any good hoop/hub combo, it needs to be built well, or its just more junk.
 
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