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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First off, I am new to road cycling and using this site to expand my knowledge. I have read plenty of hate threads about the new Masi bikes. That being said, I purchased a new 2007 Masi Vincere for $700 being clearanced out. I purchased it mainly because of the 10 speed 105 groupset with Ultegra Rear Derailleur. I am 5'9" and weight 195lb, bought the bike to get in better shape. Here are the specs:

Crankset: TruVativ Elita C 2.0 w/ Giga X-Pipe integrated BB; 50/34
Bottom Bracket: TruVativ Integrated w/ Crankset
Freewheel: Shimano 105 10 Speed 11-25
Handlebars: Ritchey 6061 31.8mm
Stem: Masi ATS Adjustable Height System
Hubset / Wheelset: Shimano R500
Tires: Vittoria Zaffiro 23c Wire Bead
Brakes: Shimano BR560 Cold Forged Dual Pivot

I have already installed Shimano SPD-M520 clipless pedals. I am on tight budget or I would have bought a more expensive bike. I am just curious what change could make the most impact for the buck.

Thanks in advance!
 

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Sticky Valentine
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28,415 Posts
The 105 stuff is good and there's really no need to upgrade when it's still working properly, which, fortunately (or unfortunately if you've got money burnin a hole in your pocket) will last quite a while. And the Ultegra rear der. is a great one and should do you very well in terms of performance and durability. If you had a Sora rear der I'd say replace that as the difference in performance from Sora to 105 and Ultegra is pretty big, but you've already got an Ultegra one, which is awesome.

My suggestion, if you absolutely want to spend on something, would be to get professionally fit on it and get rid of the adjustable stem. But the only reason for that is that I think adjustable stems look kind of goofy. But really, there's no need to replace that right now either.

I think the only thing you need to put on your bike is you :)


joe
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks! I mostly was curious about brakes, wheelset and tires I guess. I read all these posts about wheelsets and tires. I don't know what is best for the buck on those. The bike shops like to over sell the newbies. Kind of like a woman in an auto repair shop, they see you coming and smell the money.
 

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waterproof*
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41,745 Posts
Joe's right, you have a great rig that frankly is race-worthy, should you choose to go that direction.

With your weight and experience level, I think the first components to need replace/upgrade will be the wheels. It's just a fact, I weigh 195 in the off season and heavier guys beat up wheels. Riding technique (how to hit a bump etc) counts, too.

But for now, ride the heck outta that thing.

Oh p.s., +1 for the fitting. But first read the thread about "witch doctors" over in the coaching forum.
 

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Fat'r + Slow'r than TMB
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You said you were on a budget so stick to it. Replace stuff as it breaks (which will be a while) or needs replacing such as tires. You have a great starter bike.
 

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Adventure Seeker
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5,123 Posts
Ignore the hate stuff about them, it's kinda like bikesdirect. Just because it's a company using a famous older name doesn't make it garbage. As far as upgrades, I think wheels too - better bearings will help your ride. Lighter wheels will look cooler, and spin up faster, yet won't increase your average speed. And $700 is a steal, where you get it from? I might try to get one too! (Seriously!)

EDIT: Just looked up the specs - the Shimano wheels are good wheels, and they look good too. I'd say upgrade your brake pads, and get a nice Zefal frame pump. Then you'll really be good to go!
 

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When the tires wear out, replace them with kevlar bead / folding tires. This will save as much as 200 grams and is a lot cheaper than buying 200 gram lighter wheels. Plus all this weight is right at the rim where it makes the msot difference for acceleration.

Landau
 

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Colorado Springs, CO
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631 Posts
bwebb73 said:
First off, I am new to road cycling and using this site to expand my knowledge. I have read plenty of hate threads about the new Masi bikes. That being said, I purchased a new 2007 Masi Vincere for $700 being clearanced out. I purchased it mainly because of the 10 speed 105 groupset with Ultegra Rear Derailleur. I am 5'9" and weight 195lb, bought the bike to get in better shape. Here are the specs:

Crankset: TruVativ Elita C 2.0 w/ Giga X-Pipe integrated BB; 50/34
Bottom Bracket: TruVativ Integrated w/ Crankset
Freewheel: Shimano 105 10 Speed 11-25
Handlebars: Ritchey 6061 31.8mm
Stem: Masi ATS Adjustable Height System
Hubset / Wheelset: Shimano R500
Tires: Vittoria Zaffiro 23c Wire Bead
Brakes: Shimano BR560 Cold Forged Dual Pivot

I have already installed Shimano SPD-M520 clipless pedals. I am on tight budget or I would have bought a more expensive bike. I am just curious what change could make the most impact for the buck.

Thanks in advance!


I have been riding for four years now, just picking up cycling in 2005. ]

Your bike the way it is sounds fantastic. But, you'll want to upgrade parts, but don't' do it until things start wearing out. Then replace them with better stuff. Plus, as you ride more, you'll know the kind of stuff that isn't making the grade for you. Right now, doing regular maintenance will keep your bike nice and new: keep the chain and drive train (cogs and chainrings) clean, and everything else adjusted. After a couple of hundred miles, take your while bike in and have it looked over and have them make certain the wheels are true.

Here is what I would upgrade to as you move forward to replace things:

1) Brake Pads: I like the Kool Stop (black) ones. The material seems to be more squishy and responsive than the stock pads that come with most brakes.

2) Tires: You're gonna find a tire that works well for you, a good all-around tire that doesn't get flat at the slightest hint of road junk or something that is really thick and unresponsive. I like the Continental GP4000 tire, good all-around, all season, tire. Seems to perform good in wet conditions too (solid road grip coming down a mountain pass here in Colorado in the rain). I have a riding buddy that likes the Michelin Carbon ones and thinks they are great. Tires are right up there with personal items like saddles. One person may think it is great, another junk. Just find some to try out (scour this website for experiences) as you wear out tires and you'll settle on one that you like.

3) Wheels: Ride what you got for a while. You'll probably get two or three seasons out of them before thinking of replacement. Then, when you do, look out. Ge the right set of new wheels and you'll think you have strapped a rocket motor on your back. There are many choices. I think many people on this forum might have two or more sets of wheels for varying conditions. Mavic Kysirium ES is a good wheel, but you will need to do yearly hub maintenance to make certain the bearings don't fry (I had a set of these, and developed a flat spot the wheel and the bearings shot on a long downhill - but got three good years out of them). Mavic wheelsets (the ones where Mavic does the whole wheel) seem to also be notorious for broken spokes. But, they are a nice wheel when working right. I also had a set built for about $600 (two wheels) from The Colorado Cyclist. Mavic Open Pro rims (32H or 36H - can't remember), double-butt spokes, alloy nipples, DT Swiss hubs. I then put a Mr. Tuffy in the wheel (flat stopper, goes between the tube and tire). I now have a pair of indestructible wheels that I use for general training. If I had to do it over again, I'd do the same wheel with Chris King Hubs. If you can get to a organized bike ride and demo some wheels, then that may be the way to go. There are tons of "nice" wheels, and at really "nice" prices too!

4) Upgrade your bike engine. Yes, that is you! Ride smart, train smart, and mostly, eat smart. You don't need special diets, formulas, or training coaches. The most adaptable part of your engine is your heart.You start pushing it, and it'll adapt to the new load. Your mind will have to convince the other parts of your body to keep going and not head back for that beer and TV session. But, then again, you need to gradually build up to the big miles. Check out the training schedule on the Ride The Rockies web site. Regular training with regular rest periods are good. Next, take a look at your diet and look at all the fluff that may be in there. Donuts are OK, Big Macs are OK too. But a steady diet of this kind of stuff will hinder your progress. You don't have to become a monk, just be prudent about what you eat - this usually means bringing your lunch to get away from all the hidden fat and salt in restaurant food.

5) Upgrade your engine fuel and eat smart for your riding. Your body is capable of processing ~80G of carbohydrates per hour. So, check out the carb content in the energy drinks and bars you might be using so you don't over consume. A good indicator is if your stomach is happy, then everything is probably OK. Water is really important. You'll find the right stuff to fuel up with and not bonk. The night before a long ride is important because what you eat the night before you ride on the next day. Anything is fair game to consume, but stay away from large amounts of meat (beef, chicken). Protein is hard for your system to process and it won't be fully processed for use by your system until well into the next day (when you really need it at the start of the day). Small amounts of meat are OK (think spaghetti with meat sauce, but I usually do a red meatless sauce), and bread and veggies. When you finish the ride, then it is time for the big 'ol steak, potato, martini.... for breakfast before big rides I find that oatmeal, a piece of fruit, and a container of yogurt works really good. If it is a long ride (like a century), I might add a GU just before hopping on the bike. Think of your system as a battery. You charge it up with food, and then keep adding more charge as you go along the ride. Except, that you can't replace the energy at the rate you are burning it up at. Cycling is hard work, fuel properly for it and keep ahead of the bonk.

Keep pedaling!
 
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