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I just signed up to do an 8 day Arthritis benefit ride and now need to get a bike. Because of some limitation of my arthritis and the bike handles, I need to use a hybrid bike. I am a beginner so I am not looking for the greatest bike in the world, but I do want a bike that will be comfortable and maybe if I enjoy my experience, use it for many years to come.

My local bike shop has two bikes which I am considering: Trek 7300 and the Diamondback Edgewood. I have tried doing research online but can't find any or many reviews on any of these bikes. The Trek is more expensive, but since i am no expert when I rode both bikes, they both felt good to me. Is it worth spending the extra $150 on the Trek? Is the Diamondback a good bike?

Help - I would love for someone to help me make the decision - other than the bike store clerk.

V
 

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I would re-think the hybrid idea

I know a person who decided that he needed some type of exercise program, something he could do with his kids, etc. He wanted a bike and since I ride he asked me lots of questions. I suggested that he get a cross bike after he described to me what he wanted out of the bike. He was set on buying local as opposed to online and was looking at hybrids. He looked at alot of bikes, thinking he wanted the upright position of a hybrid. He found out on his own about the hybrids limitations not long after buying the bike and is now shopping for the cross or an upright road bike like a Trek Pilot. It still has the characteristics of a road bike but positions you more upright, has the drop bars and STI shifters. Brakes between a cross and upright vary from cantilever vs dual pivot, you probably won't notice a difference. Cross bikes are a beefy road bike, larger tires, stronger brakes, lower gearing than a normal off the rack road bike. My opinion, hybrid bike is not a longer distance bike, which is what you are planning to use the bike for.
 

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vgb16 said:
I just signed up to do an 8 day Arthritis benefit ride and now need to get a bike. Because of some limitation of my arthritis and the bike handles, I need to use a hybrid bike. I am a beginner so I am not looking for the greatest bike in the world, but I do want a bike that will be comfortable and maybe if I enjoy my experience, use it for many years to come.

My local bike shop has two bikes which I am considering: Trek 7300 and the Diamondback Edgewood. I have tried doing research online but can't find any or many reviews on any of these bikes. The Trek is more expensive, but since i am no expert when I rode both bikes, they both felt good to me. Is it worth spending the extra $150 on the Trek? Is the Diamondback a good bike?

Help - I would love for someone to help me make the decision - other than the bike store clerk.

V
Hybrids aren't all that good for long distance. The gearing isn't right, too low for distance/group rides. Look at the Trek Pilot, and the Specialized Sequoia series bikes, maybe even the Specialized Roubaix for good measure. All these bikes have drop style bars, but they offer more positions than a typical hybrid flat or riser bar. Make sure you test ride the bike before you buy, it's got to fit - if it doesn't fit well, you'll put it down after a short time and it'll collect dust.

Thes bikes mentioned are a bit more expensive, but they are much more suited to the riding style/needs described.

Have fun on the ride, and pace yourself!:thumbsup:
 

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My wife has a Trek 7300. IMO, it's a pretty nice bike. She's had it for a year, and is already making noises like she'd like another bike.

Don't get me wrong, the Trek is nice, and I would also suggest that you may be happier if you bought a little better bike even if it has drop handlebars. One of my wife's complaints is that her hands bother her on long rides. That's because she has only 1 place to put her hands. Drop bars have at least 6. You don't have to bend over & ride with your hands in the drops. If you rest your hands on the tops of the bars, you won't be bending over any farther than if you had flat bars like the 7300.
 

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I'm not trying to be negative or anything, but u signed up for an 8 day ride without any biking experience AND you have arthritis? How many miles per day? Good luck.

Go to a decent shop, not necessarily a high end shop, and talk to the oldest guy who works there. If there is no one under 40 go to the next one. Talk bikes, but also ask him about good gloves, shoes, & padded shorts. Get some riding time on several bikes. Then see if they will will let you try several saddles before picking the one you actually buy.

Don't hurt yourself for the cause.
 
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