Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi!


I'm finally ready to "grow out" of my Trek FX 7.3 Hybrid and make the move to a road bike.
I started doing some research but I'm mostly clueless about bikes. I only ride for recreational and weight loss purposes so I don't need the top of the line. For me (I think) comfort is more important than performance - the longer I can go without my back hurting the better. My budget is $1000-1500.
Bikes I've looked at and test driven so far:
1. Fuji Roubaix 2.0 LE
2. Cannondale CAAD12 105


They both seem to have similar components, though for some reason one is getting 2/5 stars on a bike review site and the latter 5/5. Also a $500 price difference.
Anyhow, I was looking to get some advice on which one to get, or possibly if there are other models to consider that would be great as well.
The other piece of information I'm trying to figure out is size. I'm 5 10", and I've been advised to get a size 56, but I'm questioning that advice...


Thanks in advance!!


Danny
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
689 Posts
Can't go wrong with the Cannondale. The Caad frames are very nice and should you ever decide to leave the 105 group for something else the frame will be worthy of whatever parts you want to hang on it. Fuji's will tend to be cheaper at any level when looking solely at the component mix. But the CAAD frame is much nicer (and has quite a pedigree) compared to anything aluminum you'd get from Fuji. IME Cannondales tend to have a better dealer network as well, so you should get a good shop tied to your purchase that can help you out down the road.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,642 Posts
They're both good choices, and are similarly equipped. I could ride happily on either one. The Fuji may only be available from Performance, though, as I don't see the 2.0 model on the Fuji website, and Performance advertises it as an "exclusive". Unless you have an outlet near you, I would suggest getting the Cannondale from a LBS and at least have a chance of having someone knowledgeable direct you to the right frame size. They're both race oriented bikes, and there's no standard geometry among various brands.
 

·
Cycling induced anoesis
Joined
·
13,006 Posts
Since you mention comfort and back pain, I suggest shopping for a reputable shop that recognizes the importance of fit and promotes test rides. From there, you can leave sizing requirements up to them - as was noted, there are no industry standards for frame sizing.

Beyond that, I suggest test riding as many bikes as you can. The difference between endurance and race geo is pretty subtle, so I wouldn't let that be the driving force.

Getting sizing and fit right is key to comfort.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,695 Posts
Hi!


I'm finally ready to "grow out" of my Trek FX 7.3 Hybrid and make the move to a road bike.
I started doing some research but I'm mostly clueless about bikes. I only ride for recreational and weight loss purposes so I don't need the top of the line. For me (I think) comfort is more important than performance - the longer I can go without my back hurting the better. My budget is $1000-1500.
Bikes I've looked at and test driven so far:
1. Fuji Roubaix 2.0 LE
2. Cannondale CAAD12 105


They both seem to have similar components, though for some reason one is getting 2/5 stars on a bike review site and the latter 5/5. Also a $500 price difference.
Anyhow, I was looking to get some advice on which one to get, or possibly if there are other models to consider that would be great as well.
The other piece of information I'm trying to figure out is size. I'm 5 10", and I've been advised to get a size 56, but I'm questioning that advice...


Thanks in advance!!


Danny
I've not ridden either bike but it seems you've selected two very different bikes. The CAAD is aluminum and is a favorite of criterium racers. It's probably good for short fast sprints but not ideal for long days in the saddle. Don't know much at all about the Fuji Roubaix. Considering the name I'm surprised to pull up a spec with 23 cm wheels and an aluminum frame. I expected something different.

in your price range you will need to compromise. It probably means a lower end group set, entry level wheels and most likely an aluminum frame. Perhaps you should see if the bikes support 25 cm tires which may make them more comfortable to ride. Steel might also be an option. But if I could only pick among the two I'd probably go CAAD which has a large user base and fan club although there are things about it I don't like.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks everyone.
Btw I'm not limited to choosing between these two bikes, so if anyone has other options to consider I would love to know :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
159 Posts
There are a lot of very good bikes in that price range, most if not all the major manufactures make a few models in that range. Like others have said my advise would be to go to a local bike shop that will be able to spend the time needed to properly fit you. In fact I would worry less about the particular model or make for now and focus on finding the shop you would prefer to deal with. Go to as many shops in your area that you can, talk to the sales staff and let them know exactly what your goals, price range, and any other limiting factors are. The shop/shops willing to listen and accommodate you are the one/ones you want to shop from. At that point you can focus on what brand and model depending on what the shop you choose sells.

SS-
 

·
Shuffleman
Joined
·
678 Posts
Thanks everyone.
Btw I'm not limited to choosing between these two bikes, so if anyone has other options to consider I would love to know :)
Your budget is absolutely fine. Both bikes that you picked are great bikes and would be fine. I would test them both out and then possibly test out an endurance frame as well. Possibly a Felt Z 95, Fuji or Specialized equivalent. You had mentioned a back issue so this may be a better fit. All of the major brands have an endurance level bike in that price range. I would recommend that you stick in the lower end of your budget though. Its your first road bike and it is not worth investing a ton into it because you really do not know if you will like the sport or what style of bike you will ultimately prefer. It usually takes 2 years of riding for this to take place. Don't get me wrong the 105 groupset is nice but there is nothing wrong with Tiagra or Sora either. The main difference is in the weight, not so much the shift quality. Go to your LBS or Performance and ask them to show you some endurance bikes and traditional geometry bikes. Test them out and see what feels the best to you.
 

·
Neophyte
Joined
·
2,190 Posts
I don't think you'll go wrong with either of those, and it seems like your budget will afford you a good bike no matter what, so have fun. I can say I have multiple friends/family that are happy with CAAD10/CAAD12.

If it's your first serious road bike, I don't think it's a bad idea to go alloy, and if you're going to do that the CAADs and Speclialized Allez both seem to have pretty good reputations. That said, if you don't plan to crash a lot or whatnot, carbon is the cool stuff, right?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
82 Posts
At least think about the Felt Z series bikes. Really comfortable, generally less $$ than bigger brands for similar components. That's what I started with 4 years ago. The aluminum Z85 is in your price range and has 105 components. But for $500 more you can get a Z5 carbon with 105 components. Again worth a look. I am not affiliated with Felt.
 

·
Banned Sock Puppet
Joined
·
14,404 Posts
Since you mention comfort and back pain, I suggest shopping for a reputable shop that recognizes the importance of fit and promotes test rides. From there, you can leave sizing requirements up to them - as was noted, there are no industry standards for frame sizing.

Beyond that, I suggest test riding as many bikes as you can.

Getting sizing and fit right is key to comfort.
^^^This^^^

Don't focus on brand. Focus on the quality of the bike shop. Find a shop that will work with you on getting a proper fit. Choose the shop first, the bike second.

The CAAD series of Cannondale bikes are very good. However, they are more race type bikes. If comfort is more important to you and you have back issues, you may want to look more at "endurance" bikes like the Cannondale Synapse which has a more relaxed upright profile. The Trek Domane, Specialized Roubaix and Giant Defy are also good endurance type bikes.

About sizing, I am also 5' 10" and take a 56cm frame. But that is not necessarily a good guideline. You may have different proportions. Also, sizing varies from brand to brand.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
239 Posts
I've been riding an aluminum Trek 1.1 for 3 years and it's been great. Eventually, I want to upgrade to a Trek Domane 4.5 with carbon everything. The Trek 1.1 will be a fine backup bike if the 4.5 has to go in the shop for any reason. The endurance frame geometry on the Domane sounds like it would be perfect for my style of riding.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
233 Posts
I've been riding an aluminum Trek 1.1 for 3 years and it's been great. Eventually, I want to upgrade to a Trek Domane 4.5 with carbon everything. The Trek 1.1 will be a fine backup bike if the 4.5 has to go in the shop for any reason. The endurance frame geometry on the Domane sounds like it would be perfect for my style of riding.

I went the similar route...

Started on the Trek 1.2 for 2 years. Went to the Trek 2.3. Now sitting at the Domane 4.5. The 2.3 was a great bike until is was stolen 2 weeks ago. It was mainly my shorter route bike.

The Domane is a completely different feel. Very comfortable. Kinda lags when climbing compared to the 2.3, but better in all other phases. I would give it a shot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
239 Posts
I went the similar route...

Started on the Trek 1.2 for 2 years. Went to the Trek 2.3. Now sitting at the Domane 4.5. The 2.3 was a great bike until is was stolen 2 weeks ago. It was mainly my shorter route bike.

The Domane is a completely different feel. Very comfortable. Kinda lags when climbing compared to the 2.3, but better in all other phases. I would give it a shot.
Cool. I can't wait to see the 2017 line of Domanes. Looks like they don't change much. The '15s and '16s in 4.5 model have pretty much the exact same specs. I won't have the cash for Domane 4.5 until tax refund time next year, but if I can find a '15 or '16 on sale... I'm gonna get it. :thumbsup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,695 Posts
Similar. Started on a Trek 330 (steel), then Trek 1200(aluminum) then Trek 5200(carbon) but have since given up on Trek and enjoying my C-59 which just feels better all around, but I still enjoy riding my Trek every now and then.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Have you looked at the Trek ALR 5?

Its an aluminum frame with a carbon fork, full 105, and 8.4kg in a 56cm frame. Also from Trek's "performance/racing" line so the geometry should be similar to the CAAD. Worth a look.

Thanks everyone.
Btw I'm not limited to choosing between these two bikes, so if anyone has other options to consider I would love to know :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Dannydan, you don't say why you think a 56cm frame is not right for you. I'm 5' 10" and have a 56cm Felt Z95 frame. I have back problems so went with with the endurance Z range, which has a greater sloping top tube, rather than the traditional road bike F range, with a near horizontal one. With an endurance frame, you will sit more upright. I was concerned as to how long a distance I could cycle before my back complained too much and would need to stop. But I found the fit very comfortable with far less stress on my back than I expected. i would say that my Felt Z95 is more comfotable than my GT MTB.

As others have said, go to you LBS and ask what they offer on a personal fitting service. It's also important to try out bikes from various manufacturers so you get a feel for the subtle differences, even if it's just sitting on them.

Will you be servicing the bike yourself? If not, it's even more important to build a good relationship with your LBS. But if you are, then you can also consider the lower end of your budget and in a year or two upgrade the compromise components in your choice of bike when you get a better feel for it.

With your budget you will get a very nice bike. Don't be swayed by carbon this and carbon that since you won't be racing but with your budget you'll find that it's more than likely it'll have a carbon fork. Is this the best time to buy? If you wait till the 2017 models come out, you'll be able to pick up a 2016 model at a third less, possibly even more. However, that requires some massive deferred gratifcation. Are you able to wait?

Keep up your research especially understanding fit so that when you do commit to buying, you'll be making an informed decision.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top