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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
After doing alot of shopping around for a commuter, I think I'm ready to pull the trigger on an Ibex Corrida. I'm only trying to decide between the LT 4.4 or the Ultimate, and would like some practical advise.

Link here: http://www.ibexbikes.com/Stacks/Series_Corrida.html

I'm not too familiar with road bike components as this will be my first. I've only been riding mountain bikes up until now. My commute to work involves about 5 miles of rolling hills (10 miles round trip). The lunch time jaunt to the gym is probably another 5 miles round trip. So we're talking about 15 miles a day. There are a couple descents where I'll be braking fairly steadily to control speed, which means there a couple reasonable climbs in the other direction.

The Ultimate is about 1.5 pounds heavier than the LT and includes an Ultegra vs. 105 rear derailleur, Avid BB7 mechanical discs vs. Tektro mini-V, upgraded front derailleur (which won't get much use on the commute route), TruVativ Elita vs. Touro crankset, 10 speed vs. 9 speed cassette, Shimano R770 vs. R443 shift levers (have seen the R443 at an LBS and am not crazy about them).

Basically, I'm looking for opinions as to whether the extra $300 for the component upgrades of the Ultimate are significant enough to warrant the price. Weight of the bike isn't a huge concern since it'll be loaded down by a rear tire rack and panniers anyhow. Another option would be to get the LT model and upgrade the brakes and levers (which I think is a real weak point on the LT) to something like Avid Single Digit 7 and Avid levers for about $90.

Any input on this, and other considerations I might want to be aware of would be very helpful!!!

Thanks in advance.
 

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You have done some good research. If I was you (and I'm not) I would go with the better components. You are going to be the engine for the bike, so a couple of pounds difference in bike weight are only a small percentage of total weight, something less than one percent difference. You will, however, be riding, shifting and braking regularly, so it stands to reason that the better mechanicals will make you a happier camper. This is just how my reasoning goes.
 

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Two years ago I purchased an Ibex Corrida 2.2 CT, which was the base model for that line. It served me well and was definitely an excellent value. I find that the law of diminishing returns would not justify the extra expenditure of $300. You would be getting the most bang for the buck with with the least expensive model. If however, performance is critical for you, you may wish to consider Insight Driver's advice as he has made some valid points.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
RBWPI said:
Two years ago I purchased an Ibex Corrida 2.2 CT, which was the base model for that line. It served me well and was definitely an excellent value. I find that the law of diminishing returns would not justify the extra expenditure of $300. You would be getting the most bang for the buck with with the least expensive model. If however, performance is critical for you, you may wish to consider Insight Driver's advice as he has made some valid points.

I take it, then, that the cheap brakes and levers and shift levers haven't let you down? I think this is my main concern... After a couple moutain bike incidents a while back, I'm paranoid about brakes!
 

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2005 Corrida LT 4.4 owner

I purchased this bike last year about this time last year, and it has served me quite well. The stock wheels are very low end, and you should expect to want to upgrade very quickly.

I have personally outgrown this bike rather quickly, as I purchased it thinking I would only be riding as you described. However, road cycling is becoming or has become a passion of mine.

You will want to immediately add bar ends as there simply aren't enough hand positions on the flat bar.

Overall quality for the price is quite good. Hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
akeelor said:
I purchased this bike last year about this time last year, and it has served me quite well. The stock wheels are very low end, and you should expect to want to upgrade very quickly.

I have personally outgrown this bike rather quickly, as I purchased it thinking I would only be riding as you described. However, road cycling is becoming or has become a passion of mine.

You will want to immediately add bar ends as there simply aren't enough hand positions on the flat bar.

Overall quality for the price is quite good. Hope this helps.
Thanks for the input... I definitely don't have time for any more passions, so I won't have your problem... That said, do you think you'd have been happier with the Ultimate instead of the LT? Or would you have outgrown that too? I suppose if you're really getting into road biking, then you're probably getting into sub-20 lb bikes....
 

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chieftang said:
Thanks for the input... I definitely don't have time for any more passions, so I won't have your problem... That said, do you think you'd have been happier with the Ultimate instead of the LT? Or would you have outgrown that too? I suppose if you're really getting into road biking, then you're probably getting into sub-20 lb bikes....
I put some very nice Easton Circuit wheels on the bike and it made a huge difference. I can't reiterate enough that the stock wheels are very low end and probably won't last too long. The only two major differences I see between the LT and the Ultimate are the brakes and the rear derailleur (105 is good). Some people love the disk brakes, but on a road bike I think they are overkill. Are you going to be riding through a lot of rain and mud?

No, I don't think I would have been happier with the Ultimate. Save your money and buy the LT and put on some Mavic Open Pros/Ultegra Hubs from Performance for about $200. Oh, and by the way, definitely bring the bike to your LBS to be re-built.

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
How about Cane Creek Wheels?

akeelor said:
I can't reiterate enough that the stock wheels are very low end and probably won't last too long. . . . .

Save your money and buy the LT and put on some Mavic Open Pros/Ultegra Hubs from Performance for about $200. Oh, and by the way, definitely bring the bike to your LBS to be re-built.
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Any thoughts on these wheels? 40% off at Performance: http://www.performancebike.com/shop/profile.cfm?SKU=18506&subcategory_ID=5320

Cane Creek Aerohead SG Road Wheelset
 

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Look for a used or unsold LeMond Wayzata

Great steel bike (853) and perfect for commuting. I did a lot of research on this subject three years ago and bought the Wayzata (sadly, now discontinued). A great commuting frame and set up, though the Tiagra components could be better.

But as far as handling, this bike is excellent. I ride all year round in Chicago and this thing is great in all kinds of conditions. A bit upright when riding into the wind, but that's a quibble considering how many near-misses I've had thanks to the the ability to stop and/or steer around car doors, ice patches, gravel, glass, and idiots on the bike path and in cars on their cell phones.

There are still dealers with new (`05) models in stock and a google search on "lemond wayzata" will likely locate a few.

Also, every now and then one pops up on eBay or here in the classifieds.

Anyway, just another consideration. It's a sturdy, stable and fast bike that splits the difference between road and cross.
 
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