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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Almost the last thing I need to sort out is what wheels to put on my next bike. I'm looking at these two sets currently:

Racing Quattro Carbon DB - Road Bike Wheels

and

Hed Belgium Plus DT Swiss 240 Custom Disc Wheelset - Glory Cycles


I don't know a whole lot about wheels. Both of these seem to be decent and in my price range. If any one has a thought as to why I should prefer one over the other or a suggestion of another wheel set I should look at that you think is clearly better, please let me know.
 

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can you give more details? What are you doing with these? your size, weight, riding style, etc.. see the sticky at the top which outlines the questions that most are going to ask before giving you a decent answer.

However, the usual recommendation from this group is to go with something custom built to your needs with no proprietary parts. So the HED with DT240.
 

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You give us nothing about yourself, your needs and your riding. Fill out the FAQ as cnardone suggests.

With your lack of knowledge on wheels I wonder about your consideration of carbon wheels and straight pull spoke hubs and their spoke availability. The 240 wheels seem overpriced.

If you're wanting to spend that kind of money, consider November Bicycles: Race smart. - Home - it's tough to get a better price in high-end wheels than from those guys.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
· Why do you want new wheels? What's wrong with your old ones?

I’m buying a new bike. New bikes come with new wheels.

· What are you old ones? (rim name, hub name, spokes, their numbers)

Dunno. 15 year old Bontrager Selects something-or-other. The wheels that came with my current bike.

· How much do you want to spend?

The wheels I’ve been looking at are in the $1000-$1200 range. I'm not married to this number. I'm pretty sure I'm not gonna pay $3500.

· How heavy are you?

I’m not buying this bike today. I will be somewhere between 165-185 lbs. when I buy this bike.

· Do you ride "light" or "heavy"? Are you powerful or smooth?

“light or heavy”? I have no idea what this means. I didn’t find anything useful when I googled it either. “powerful or smooth”? I did not know this was an either/or proposition. Also, compared to who? I have no idea how to answer this question.

· Have you had problems with your current wheels and if so, what?

Nope.

· What condition are the roads in that you ride?

Mostly decent. I don’t go out of my way to ride on crappy roads.

· What tires, widths and pressures are you using?

None yet. New bike.

· What do you expect from your new wheels that your old ones can't deliver? (be reasonable and realistic here!)

I expect they will be attached to a new bike.

· What are you going to use the wheels for - recreational riding, touring (loaded), training, racing, general purpose?

Recreational riding and home-brewed “training”.

· Do you want custom hand-built (designed for you) or factory pre-built?

This is one of the things about which I was hoping to gain some insight.

· Do you want wheels that are easily repairable with readily available, reasonably priced spokes and rims or are you ok with maybe having to ship your wheels back to the factory and wheels that contain expensive, proprietary spokes and possibly un-obtainium replacement rims?

Dude, I don’t know. I don’t want wheels that are impossible to repair. I’d rather not have to ship wheels back to the factory. I’d prefer the LBS guy to be able to handle it, but it’s not necessarily a deal breaker.

· Do you need 11spd compatible wheels (can be used with 8 ~10spd cassettes too by using a spacer) or are 10spd wheels ok? (can only be used with 8 ~ 10spd cassettes). Edit - This info is for Shimano & SRAM related cassettes; not Campagnolo.

11 speed.

· Do you want the wheels to be oriented towards "aero" or "light"?

Meh. I just want good wheels that I won’t want to replace in six months. Probably not specifically aero.

· Do you want to use regular clincher, tubeless, or tubular tires?

Clinchers. The other stuff just looks like too much of a PITA.

· Aluminum or carbon rims?

Carbon. But I am open to contrary arguments.

· Rim brakes or disk brakes?

Disc.

· Rear hub width? (120, 126, 130, 135MM)

I have no idea, and I can’t seem to find this information.

· Do you want adjustable loose ball bearing hubs (almost exclusively Shimano) or cartridge bearing hubs (almost everything else)?

Well, I guess that would depend on whether I decide to buy Shimano wheels. Hey, do you guys think I should buy Shimano wheels?
 

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With a new bike that will be used for recreation and training I really don't think you need new wheels. Even if the bike comes with super cheap wheels you my as well just ride them until they wont stay true or a spoke breaks. If you were heavier, racing or touring with a bunch of cargo you would probably benefit from new wheels compared to what comes on most bikes. That doesn't seem to be the case for you.

With that being said custom wheels can be nice so you can choose your own hub, spokes and rims. For example if you want a Shimano rim but would prefer a sealed bearing hub like DT Swiss. I built my last set of mountain bike wheels with DT Swiss hubs, DT Swiss double butted spokes and Stan's Arch rims. I definitely wanted the Stan's rims but not their hubs so it had to be custom built.

As far as carbon vs aluminum goes. A good set of either will weight roughly the same. Carbon tends to provide a better ride especially on rougher texture roads but spokes will have a significant impact on ride quality as well. Neither will have as much of an effect on ride quality or speed as the right set of tires at the right PSI.
 

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I don't see any advantage to the Carbon wheels you posted in the first post and they are too low a spoke count if you ask me. The Belgium plus 24 front and 28 back would be a very nice wheel set for a disc brake bike at your weight.
 

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I agree with Srode.

Given your two choices, the Belgium Plus is the better choice for you.

That said, based on your answers to the FAQ questions, there are probably a bunch of less expensive options that you would be satisfied with.

Edit to add:
In fact, the ad's on the right side of this page show an offer for a set of Shimano Dura Ace WH-9000 C-24's for less than $800. That's a carbon/aluminum hybrid wheel, and is well regarded as one of the best values in an all around performance wheel.

Shimano WH-9000 Carbon Clincher Wheelset > Components | Jenson USA

These wheel sets are on sale just about everywhere because Shimano is releasing a newer version soon (very little difference between the current and new C-24's). You might check your LBS, or whatever your favorite online retailer is. These are great wheels at their normal price. On sale it's quite a bargain.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks guys.


With a new bike that will be used for recreation and training I really don't think you need new wheels.

As far as carbon vs aluminum goes. A good set of either will weight roughly the same. Carbon tends to provide a better ride especially on rougher texture roads but spokes will have a significant impact on ride quality as well. Neither will have as much of an effect on ride quality or speed as the right set of tires at the right PSI.
I'm not buying a replacement set. I'm picking the first set of wheels that will come with the new bike. Also. I haven't researched tires yet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Edit to add:
In fact, the ad's on the right side of this page show an offer for a set of Shimano Dura Ace WH-9000 C-24's for less than $800. That's a carbon/aluminum hybrid wheel, and is well regarded as one of the best values in an all around performance wheel.

Shimano WH-9000 Carbon Clincher Wheelset > Components | Jenson USA

These wheel sets are on sale just about everywhere because Shimano is releasing a newer version soon (very little difference between the current and new C-24's). You might check your LBS, or whatever your favorite online retailer is. These are great wheels at their normal price. On sale it's quite a bargain.
I like the Dura Ace wheels, mainly because they say Dura Ace on 'em. These look like rim brake wheels to me though. Do they come in a disc version?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Both of the wheels listed in my OP were suggested as options by my LBS guy after talking to him about what I was looking for. I am open to additional suggestions.
 

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Thanks guys.




I'm not buying a replacement set. I'm picking the first set of wheels that will come with the new bike. Also. I haven't researched tires yet.
Sorry I missed that! Since you have disk brakes I can't think of any reason not to use carbon besides price. If you want to save money somewhere in the build aluminum rims would be a better way to go.

The quattro wheels seem full of sales gimmicks to me. The high hub flanges could make for a stiffer wheel but they lose that with such a low spoke count. Also from my understanding the rim needs to be built stronger (heavier) to accomodate a lower spoke count.

I'm partial to DT Swiss hubs. Even their "budget" 350 hubs are excellent quality. Also you can convert them from QR to throu axle. You can basically convert them to whichever axle type you want instead of buying a whole new hub. So if you happen to buy another new bike in the near future with throu axles you can still use the wheels you're getting now. I have no experience with Hed rims but its hard to go wrong with any carbon rims now. Even the Chinese light-bicycle carbon rims are very strong and reliable. I can't see the spoke count on the Hed / DT wheel but as mentioned above 24 front and 28 rear would be a good choice.
 

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· Rear hub width? (120, 126, 130, 135MM)

I have no idea, and I can’t seem to find this information.
[/B]
I think the Heds are the best choice out of the two options you posted. The rear hub size is an important piece of information if you are going to go with the Heds that you linked to in the OP. From that link it looks like they only have 10s hub options for quick release wheels. All of their 11s options are 12x142. What kind of bike are you getting?

In any event I think those wheels are overpriced. You can get those rims laced to White Industries or Industry 9 hubs from November Wheels for under a grand. November Bicycles: Race smart. - Select Disc
 

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I like the Dura Ace wheels, mainly because they say Dura Ace on 'em. These look like rim brake wheels to me though. Do they come in a disc version?
Ahh yes, you are correct. I just realized you need disc brake wheels.

They do not come win a disc version.
 

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I'd buy HED's again in a heartbeat. DT Hubs are also excellent. I weigh a bit more than you do, and a 24/28 was plenty strong enough for me. Pick silver spokes! (my preference)
 

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Do you ride "light" or "heavy"? Are you powerful or smooth?

“light or heavy”? I have no idea what this means. I didn’t find anything useful when I googled it either. “powerful or smooth”? I did not know this was an either/or proposition. Also, compared to who? I have no idea how to answer this question.
Some people "ride heavy" by never raising up their body when then ride over rough spots, railroad tracks, potholes, etc. and never seemto swerve around such wheel damaging obstacles. Others "ride light" and never seem to have wheel trouble.

Just pulling a number out of thin air (I'll be interested in others' thoughts about this number) I would say that "riding heavy" vs. "riding light" can be the same as being 40 lbs. heavier.
 

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Just pulling a number out of thin air (I'll be interested in others' thoughts about this number) I would say that "riding heavy" vs. "riding light" can be the same as being 40 lbs. heavier.
I'd say way more, potentially, and probably not something we could put a number on and have it apply in general.

I'm about 140 and although I've never gotten a pinch flat (because I pay attention and ride very light, I think) I'm pretty sure I could get one if I tried to induce one by staying planted on the saddle and going over rail road tracks at a good clip. I've seen plenty of guys my own weight do it when I don't.
But by the same token I'm pretty sure someone 240 pounds could go over those same tracks with the same tires at the same speed and the same PSI and not pinch flat as long as they were paying attention and knew how to handle it.

I know the topic isn't pinch flats per se and you're talking habits not just one event but just to illustrate the difference that's possible between someone who rides light and someone who doesn't 'get' that.
 

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I like Kerry's description of "light" and "heavy". I'm not sure if 40lbs is the right number. I'd be inclined to think more.

I might be an extreme example, but I'm definitely in the 'Ride Light' category. I'm 54 years old, 6' 5" and weigh 235-240lbs dry. I have a set of HED C2's in 24f/28r configuration that I run with 25mm Conti 4 seasons at ~85f and 95r. Most of the wheel experts here advise 32/32 or even 36/36 for people in my clyde category (I didn't really know any better when I bought these wheels). I've put 10k miles on them over the last two plus years, and can count the pinch flats I've had on one finger. And that was just a stupid mistake on my part (forgot to check inflation before I left, and took the gravel road home) or the number would be zero. In fact I rarely get flats at all (two or three is all I can remember). The wheels are in excellent shape, zero broken spokes, never needed truing etc...

I ride with a guy that is 75lbs lighter than me, runs 32 spoke front and rear and 25mm Conti gatorskins at 100psi, and I've lost count of number of flats he's had (pinch and puncture). He has also broken a couple of spokes in the time we've been riding together.

He just rides differently than me. He's not careless (at least not in a dangerous way). He's just not as 'light' of a rider as I am, even though I outweigh him considerably. I think a lot of things go into this (Kerry eluded to some). Avoiding problems comes first, and that is partly due to focusing on your path and identifying and avoiding things that you can avoid safely. Unweighting the bike in situations where you can't avoid a bump (railroad tracks, etc...) is also part of it. Route selection helps too, although this year I rode a *lot* of gravel, and expected more flats, but they never materialized (except the one boneheaded mistake).
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I like Kerry's description of "light" and "heavy". I'm not sure if 40lbs is the right number. I'd be inclined to think more.

I might be an extreme example, but I'm definitely in the 'Ride Light' category. I'm 54 years old, 6' 5" and weigh 235-240lbs dry. I have a set of HED C2's in 24f/28r configuration that I run with 25mm Conti 4 seasons at ~85f and 95r. Most of the wheel experts here advise 32/32 or even 36/36 for people in my clyde category (I didn't really know any better when I bought these wheels). I've put 10k miles on them over the last two plus years, and can count the pinch flats I've had on one finger. And that was just a stupid mistake on my part (forgot to check inflation before I left, and took the gravel road home) or the number would be zero. In fact I rarely get flats at all (two or three is all I can remember). The wheels are in excellent shape, zero broken spokes, never needed truing etc...

I ride with a guy that is 75lbs lighter than me, runs 32 spoke front and rear and 25mm Conti gatorskins at 100psi, and I've lost count of number of flats he's had (pinch and puncture). He has also broken a couple of spokes in the time we've been riding together.

He just rides differently than me. He's not careless (at least not in a dangerous way). He's just not as 'light' of a rider as I am, even though I outweigh him considerably. I think a lot of things go into this (Kerry eluded to some). Avoiding problems comes first, and that is partly due to focusing on your path and identifying and avoiding things that you can avoid safely. Unweighting the bike in situations where you can't avoid a bump (railroad tracks, etc...) is also part of it. Route selection helps too, although this year I rode a *lot* of gravel, and expected more flats, but they never materialized (except the one boneheaded mistake).
I'd say way more, potentially, and probably not something we could put a number on and have it apply in general.

I'm about 140 and although I've never gotten a pinch flat (because I pay attention and ride very light, I think) I'm pretty sure I could get one if I tried to induce one by staying planted on the saddle and going over rail road tracks at a good clip. I've seen plenty of guys my own weight do it when I don't.
But by the same token I'm pretty sure someone 240 pounds could go over those same tracks with the same tires at the same speed and the same PSI and not pinch flat as long as they were paying attention and knew how to handle it.

I know the topic isn't pinch flats per se and you're talking habits not just one event but just to illustrate the difference that's possible between someone who rides light and someone who doesn't 'get' that.
Some people "ride heavy" by never raising up their body when then ride over rough spots, railroad tracks, potholes, etc. and never seemto swerve around such wheel damaging obstacles. Others "ride light" and never seem to have wheel trouble.

Just pulling a number out of thin air (I'll be interested in others' thoughts about this number) I would say that "riding heavy" vs. "riding light" can be the same as being 40 lbs. heavier.
Thanks guys. Learned something new today. If I had to guess I would say I probably tend to ride "heavy." I'm just not known for being particularly sensitive to what is going on around me physically. Too goal-oriented/I've got blinders on/bull-in-a-china-shop-ish.

But I also don't remember having tons of flats in the old days. Once I hit a pothole full of water while it was raining that felt like running into a brick wall. I was amazed my bike was still in one piece after that. I could barely see through my glasses that day.


The only flat I can remember I got on a concrete overpass that was pretty stinking smooth. I never even saw whatever piece of trash did it.
 
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