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How do you install a rear wheel on an old bike where the drop out are unequal. Everytime I put it into place it doesn't sit flush on both sides. I don't know if its something with the derailer or what but I need to know how to put the rear wheel back on.

(Yea I'm probably a bit dumb)

This bike is a Fuji Royale, it had a spacer on the derailer side of the frame. I wanted to know if it should have one on both sides? And if possible is it ok to ride without the spacers, because it is no longler in a bind without a spacer. I have also noticed that the chain tensioner sits up and doesn't hang low like in the case of most. I would like to know what I need to do.

Thanks
 

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Could you repeat the question?

Rum_Runner1 said:
How do you install a rear wheel on an old bike where the drop out are unequal. Everytime I put it into place it doesn't sit flush on both sides. I don't know if its something with the derailer or what but I need to know how to put the rear wheel back on.

This bike is a Fuji Royale, it had a spacer on the derailer side of the frame. I wanted to know if it should have one on both sides? And if possible is it ok to ride without the spacers, because it is no longler in a bind without a spacer. I have also noticed that the chain tensioner sits up and doesn't hang low like in the case of most. I would like to know what I need to do.
I'm sorry, I guess I'm dense, but I don't really understand any of this. When you say the dropouts are unequal, are you talking about the frame (this is where the dropouts are) or the spacing on the hub? What do you mean "doesn't sit flush on both sides"? Are you saying that the lock nuts don't reach to the frame (left-right slop)? How the wheel fits in the frame does not have to do with the derailleur - you can put the wheel in there without the derailleur or chain in place, so this is confusing too.

What do you mean by "a spacer on the derailer side of the frame"? Again, are you talking about the hub or the frame? What is "no longler in a bind without a spacer"? Are you saying the hub was binding, or was the cog touching the frame? And what do you mean by "chain tensioner sits up and doesn't hang low like in the case of most"? Are you talking about the idler cage on the derailleur?

The hub should fit in the frame such that the lock nuts (the outermost nuts on the axle) are just touching the faces of the dropouts, the rim is centered between the seat stays (at the brakes) and the chain stays (at the bottom bracket). I think you need to find some pictures of bikes with labels on the various parts or get yourself to a bike shop. You might go to the Park Tools web site for some guidance.
 

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I'm trying to get a mental pic of your problem. Is it possible for you to post one? You said that one droupout has a spacer. Is it a threaded screw that adjusts from the rear of the bike? If it is, go ahead & take it out & ride without it. Your bike will have a slightly longer wheelbase, but that won't hurt a thing. You may have to adjust your rear der. a bit.

If the spacer is not a screw, can you remove it? What you need to make sure of is that when you install the wheel, the rear axle must be completely within the dropouts. If any part of the axle remains outside the front edge of the dropout, it's no go. Also when you install the wheel, look at it from the rear of the bike. Make sure that the wheel is straight...that is, centered between the chain stays, and in line with the seat tube. The axle doesn't have to be all the way back in the dropouts. In fact, if the bike has been in any kind of a spill, or even dropped, the dropouts may be bent, so that perfect alignment within the dropouts may not be possible.
 

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I think i know what you're talking about here... I had some el-cheepo rides in the 80's that had a semi-circle shaped nut of sorts, (it fits inside the dropout) with a flange on the back of it. The rear of derailer screwd into it, while the front was held in place with the axle nut. I think this was to hold the der in place while sliding the axle in place. Hence the uneven droput size to comp for this.

So, now I assume you've gotten ahold of one of thease, and found an alternive way to mount your derailer. To put your wheel on, slide your axle into the drop outs. (I like to do this with the bike upside down) and center the wheel in the bottom fork... with 2 fingers above the lower fork, and 2 below, hold the wheel straight, and firmly aginst the back of the short dropout while you tigheten the axle nuts or scewer....
 
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