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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I picked up this one off of craigslist for $300. The only thing I've done is add bar end shifters (to the tri bars), a chain, and pedals. I am trying to figure out exactly what it is, but I haven't had any luck. Although I know it is one of the chinese carbon frame sets, I can't figure out which one. Can anyone tell me what kind it is?





The frame is solid, and has no cracks. I'm currently 245 lbs, and I am concerned about my weight on the frame, but it seems to be fine. I could not pass the deal up. I have about $450 total in it.I am an avid mountain biker riding a Niner Rip 9 in that arena. I got this to supplement my training and get into road riding. I must say this thing is way faster than any mountain bike is on the road, and much easier to ride there too.

It is currently pieced together and working fine, although probably not correct to most people here lol. It has a 9 speed mountain cassette with an X9 derailleur, and an FSA fron derailleur. The Shimano bar end shifters work well, although they took alot of tweeking.

After watching a bunch of youtube vids, I see that there is actually a difference (geometry wise) between tri bikes and regular road bikes. I am not sure if I like the tri / bull horn bar combo, and considering selling them to replace with drop bars and brake / shift lever combos. The reason is because of my position on the bike, and I feel that regular drop bars may get me into a more relaxed position. I am not trying to maximize aerodynamics and race; I am riding for exercise.

I have a bad right leg from numerous motocross accidents years ago, and the subsequent operations to repair it. I do not walk correctly because of this, and I am constantly compensating which causes lower back irritation and pain. My lower back stays tight, and bending over into the position the tri bars require is not that comfortable. Also, since my frame appears to be more of a road bike type geometry, the bars are actually further away than they should be, thus increasing the strain on my lower back. Let it be known that I am not actually "in shape" either, and even though I have the correct saddle height, my legs are hitting my torso when on the tri bars. I ride unclipped because of the leg injury.

Any hints on how to set this up or whether or not I should move to drop bars would be appreciated.
 

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Cycling induced anoesis
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In light of your previous injuries, their subsequent effects on cycling and the fact that you're (presumably) looking to tweak your tri position, I strongly recommend you seek out a reputable fitter.

Because fit evolves, I don't generally advise someone opt for a pro fit until they have some additional saddle time, but in this case it may be best for you to consider going that route sooner rather than later. Could prevent further problems.

As far as road versus tri positioning, you're correct that there are differences - mainly in f/r weight distribution. Since this is a road bike, a knowledgeable fitter will likely set you up biased towards road riding, compromising 'some' due to the aero position. There are BTW, more/ less suitable aero bars for road bikes, so along with considering drop bars, that would be something a fitter could advise you on.

Lastly, can't help you with the make/ model of the frame, but (generally speaking) weight restrictions apply more to components (ex: CF posts) that they do frames or forks.

EDIT: Re: clipless versus platforms, I wouldn't assume that platforms offer an advantage over clipless. When set up correctly, one of the advantages of the latter is that they stabilize the foot/ ankle and prevent excessive frontal knee plane motion. Not a given in your case, but another thing to discuss with a fitter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I tried riding clipless for about a month. My right ankle is fused solid and my foot naturally has an outward point. My knee is in pretty rough shape, although it doesn't give me many problems unless I try to to force it to turn in a direction or way that isn't normal. When clipped in, my heel was hitting the crank arm every revolution. I made a small spacer to install on the pedal spindle, and this helped, but the constant use of my knee to try and turn my heel away from the crank arm caused more pain than it was worth. I was even riding on egg beaters, which are known for having a little more side to side movement than most clipless pedals. I eventually sold them.
 

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Cycling induced anoesis
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13,006 Posts
I tried riding clipless for about a month. My right ankle is fused solid and my foot naturally has an outward point...
I was even riding on egg beaters, which are known for having a little more side to side movement than most clipless pedals. I eventually sold them.
Gotcha. This is an example of why it's best to work one on one with a fitter. We (on the net) can't have that in depth convo, learn about your 'anomalies', experiences, etc.

In your case, if you haven't already, you may want to consult with a knowledgeable physiotherapist.
 
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