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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys!

A friend at work borrowed his friend's road bike, along with the MTB shoes/clipless pedals I started out road biking on, and an extra saddle I have to complete a six event thing up in Seattle (don't know what it's called but it was downhill skiing, cross country skiing, cycling, kayaking, running, and swimming). He decided he likes the whole biking thing, and he's got a mountain bike from the 90's he wants to use (he doesn't like spending money on anything). Apparently something is wrong with his fork, so we need to get him a suspension fork with a 1' steerer... I'm having a hell of a time finding one.

Can anyone point me to one - the cheaper the better for him, as he doesn't like to spend money on things and as long as it actually functions and won't crack in half on the first bump, he'll take it :)

Sorry I know this is a road forum, and that's all I ride, but I figure - any kind of riding that interests him :)

I'd appreciate being steered in any direction guys - something cheap like RST would be perfectly fine.

-Chris
 

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1" steerer susp forks are hard to find nowadays.

Marzocchi has been known to make a couple of their entry level forks in a 1" steerer in the past. The last model I knew of was the MX Pro or plain MX model.
 

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RST may be the only option for a brand new fork. About $80 for a fork. $15 1" steerers sold separately :skep:

QBP distributes them, so any shop can order one. Some on-line sites will also special order them for you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
PeanutButterBreath said:
RST may be the only option for a brand new fork. About $80 for a fork. $15 1" steerers sold separately :skep:

QBP distributes them, so any shop can order one. Some on-line sites will also special order them for you.
That would be awesome, thanks for the input :) I'm probably going in to my LBS tomorrow to pick up my bike, so I'll see if I can order it then :)

Thanks a lot!
-Chris
 

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All the real options for 1" are badly performing boat anchors. I think my MX Pro weighs at least 5.5lbs and bobs all over the place for me (135lbs). If your buddy has a decent frame and he wants to keep it, depending on what he wants to do/ride, he would probably be better off with a rigid fork.
You can normally find 1" rigid steel forks on ebay for pretty cheap. Or for like $35 at most bike stores.
There are a few excellent options for custom rigid 1" forks. Waltworks, Groovy, Viscious, etc... but they normally run like $150.

If your buddy likes the road thing, on a mtb, then do not have him get a crappy suspension fork. That's just dumb.
 

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olapequena said:
You can normally find 1" rigid steel forks on ebay for pretty cheap. Or for like $35 at most bike stores.
There are a few excellent options for custom rigid 1" forks. Waltworks, Groovy, Viscious, etc... but they normally run like $150.

If your buddy likes the road thing, on a mtb, then do not have him get a crappy suspension fork. That's just dumb.
I had the same thought but looking around I did not see any suspension corrected 1" rigid forks. The cheap Tange forks that a shop might have around would be too short to replace a suspension fork.

Custom would e nice, but I am seeing stock Viscious Cycles forks retailing for closer to $250 than $150.

Plus, some people really would rather ride a bad suspension fork than a rigid fork.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
All I know is that when people tell me - "I have an older mountain bike with a bad suspension fork, 1" steerer, where can I find the cheapest suspension fork to replace the old one with?" - that's obviously what he wants. Apparently he has a cabin up in the mountains somewhere - he likes to ride around there in the summer I guess. Point is, yeah, he'd probably be better off going one way over his way, but like I said, whatever it takes to get the guy riding :)

He definitely wants another suspension fork but doesn't care if it's used and/or it's fairly crappy, as long as it functions. He's too cheap to get another bike.

Does that change anything?
 

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you also gotta consider travel that the frame was designed for (likely 80mm or less)... I'd go rigid w/ the biggest, fattest tire that will fit
 

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His old fork was probably even lousier by modern standards. If he want's to revive the bike, I think it is a good bet that he was good enough for his purposes.

Riding MTB with a rigid fork is fun too. That's been my primary mode of off-road riding for sevearal years, though I have been playing with a hand-me-down Fox recently.

I would take the axle-to-crown measurement of his current fork. Most low-cost rigid forks with 1" steerers are built for pre-suspension bikes with <400mm a-c forks. Suspension corrected rigid forks are in the 420-465mm range and there are no stock 1" options AFAIK. But if he was on an older, shorter travel suspension fork, it might be close enough to 400mm.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I'll see if I can't get his lazy butt to bring in the old fork so I can check it out - I'll let you guys know if I can get any details and see what you think at that point.

Thanks again for all the advice - I'll pass it along.

-Chris
 

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Definitely go rigid... and check his fork.
 

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as long as the frame was built around a 63-80mm fork, which almost all 1" bikes were, a typical rider would be hard pressed to notice the difference. the kona p2 is right around 395mm a-c and will accommodate a very wide tire, like a 3.0.
 
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