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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi there,

I just bought a brand new 2010 Cannondale Caad9 5!

I really wanted a high end all aluminum frame to upgrade on so i didn't spring the money for a carbon frame.

The first upgrade I got was Mavic R Sys wheels which shaved the bike weight down to under 18lb. In addition i got Keo clipless on them. The rest of the bike is still stock.

Like I said I really plan on upgrading this thing pretty well so I was wondering if there are opinions on which I components I should upgrade next. I want to hold off on the group set as the 105s seem to be working very well for me at the moment.

Thanks
 

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what is your end goal for upgrading? ultralight climbing machine? stiff and tough crit bike? go anywhere, do anything race bike?

Wheels are the best upgrade by far for a bike. After that i'd aim for comfort/contact points. You already got the pedals which leaves bar area and saddle.

105 is good stuff so an upgrade there isn't a huge concern, and if you race that is actually a plus with the occasional mid race laydown/freelap.
 

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Upgrading is what I consider a delicate case, because you could easily lose out to just buying the higher-end version (in this case, the 9-4) or that said carbon bike in terms of money spent.

I say change the cockpit for your own liking/fitting. It's going to serve as the most important change you make along with the saddle. Changing a component group is a matter of favored ergonomics of another brand. I don't see the light in going from 105 to Ultegra.

Beyond that, there's cassette and crankset swapping if you REALLY need different gearing. Otherwise, every dollar spent is just taking away from what could be a better bike in the future, or a better bike that you could've had.

You can't completely win with the upgrading route, other than attaining more perfect fit. It'll all come down to if you really do favor your particular frame over others to consider the upgrades worthwhile.
 

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switched to 2010 Ultegra coming from 2000 105. No biggie! Man, I was expecting to be blown away. BUT, I do prefer the ergonomics of 2010 Ultegra.
 

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you're new at this, so ....... spend at least one season upgrading your motor.

No, I'm not being an a$shat. No amount of money you spend upgrading components on your new bike will yield the results that will come when you train hard and smart. A hyper-high end bike with rookie legs isn't a great combination, IMO.

If improving performance is NOT the goal of your upgrades, ignore the previous text.
 

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JustTooBig said:
you're new at this, so ....... spend at least one season upgrading your motor.

No, I'm not being an a$shat. No amount of money you spend upgrading components on your new bike will yield the results that will come when you train hard and smart. A hyper-high end bike with rookie legs isn't a great combination, IMO.

If improving performance is NOT the goal of your upgrades, ignore the previous text.

Second that....get the motor nice and strong than look at a groupset change when you wear the thing out from training down the house :thumbsup:

Cheers and enjoy your ride :)
 

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greatyuran said:
I really wanted a high end all aluminum frame to upgrade on so i didn't spring the money for a carbon frame.
Nothing wrong wanting to do the upgrade thing, but something's wrong with the math here. By the time you've satisfied the upgrade urge, most likely you'll have spent a lot of money. But be that as it may—give us a clue as to why you want to upgrade, as said. It would be easier to type out a good answer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
hi guys, thanks for the replies...

I'm primarily looking to ride it for excercise as well as with friends and do the occasional local races.

I'm only 23 so I wouldnt mind a harsher ride if it entails a lighter and stiffer bike (its why i went for the aluminmum frame).
 

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JustTooBig said:
you're new at this, so ....... spend at least one season upgrading your motor.
No, I'm not being an a$shat. No amount of money you spend upgrading components on your new bike will yield the results that will come when you train hard and smart. A hyper-high end bike with rookie legs isn't a great combination, IMO.
If improving performance is NOT the goal of your upgrades, ignore the previous text.
Agree. Or, as Eddy is purported to have put it, "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades."
 

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Some thoughts.

greatyuran said:
I'm primarily looking to ride it for excercise as well as with friends and do the occasional local races. I'm only 23 so I wouldnt mind a harsher ride if it entails a lighter and stiffer bike (its why i went for the aluminmum frame).
I'd leave well enough alone for now. With the pedals and a second set of wheels (so you can use the stock wheels for training, fun rides or as a temporary spare set should your Mavic wheels need some service), you're good to go.

If by "the occasional local race" you mean getting a license and pinning a number on your jersey, chances are good that your thoughts of upgrading equipment are going to be replaced by thoughts of upgrading your body's power output. My suggestion would be to make a commitment to improve your engine and when that happens, reward yourself with an occasional upgrade or two.

Appreciate your not minding a harsher ride: in 1987, I bought a Cannondale 3.0 "Criterium Series" bike in a quest for more speed. The thing had a rock-hard Tange steel fork on it and rattled my teeth on anything but glassy pavement. I loved it. :)
 

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Yep

JustTooBig said:
you're new at this, so ....... spend at least one season upgrading your motor.

No, I'm not being an a$shat. No amount of money you spend upgrading components on your new bike will yield the results that will come when you train hard and smart. A hyper-high end bike with rookie legs isn't a great combination, IMO.

If improving performance is NOT the goal of your upgrades, ignore the previous text.

What he said.
 

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If you did the wheels and don't want to do the group set (smart move) there's really not much left and certainly nothing where an "upgrade" would be any benefit. Well, Tires, get some good tires.

But stem, post, saddle and bars are not things worth upgrading. "Changing" however may be worthwhile. Wait until you have some miles and then decide if your arse needs a different saddle (not necessarily an upgrade, just more suited for you), bars, stem (again, suited for your hands and reach not just to get one that cost more).
 

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my personal experience on my road bike:
1. upgraded tires the day i got the bike (conti GP4000S)
2. upgraded wheels within 3 months of owning the bike (Sram S30 Sprint)
3. Upgraded stem, handlebar and replaced tape (ritchey WCS & Look tape)
4. looking to upgrade to conti supersonic tubes & pro-fit & cut steerer tube to drop weight.

upgrading is fun, and if thats what it costs to get you wanting to ride your bike even more, then do it.
 

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The upgrade that you'll notice from the already excellent 105 group is the Dura Ace. I have 2 bikes, one all 105 & the other is all Dura Ace. I can definitely tell the difference between them. Dura Ace brakes are better. They stop better and are easier to modulate. The shifts are faster, quieter, and have shorter throws. The front shift is easier & faster & I like the tactile feel of the Dura Ace levers better than the 105s.
 

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JCavilia said:
Agree. Or, as Eddy is purported to have put it, "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades."
Always liked that :thumbsup:

Upgrade? The only ”OMG this is awesome” slam dunk starting from anywhere is Di2. That said; 5700 to 6700 nothing striking. 6700 to 7900 ditto [and for some a slight downgrade with respect to front shift and crank stiffy].

Your individual tastes that come from miles, competitive needs and budget will fortunately always be served well with a broad range of Shim products [and Campy and SRAM]. Best initial bet is to follow many earlier posts…upgrade the engine and get a good pro fit. Investing in the finer stuff will follow with smaller incremental gains.
 

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jinnjia said:
I would try to replace those Tektro brakes with 105 first.........just personal preference
Just get better shoes, the brakes are fine.
 
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