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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought an entry level Fuji Sportif 3.0 disk this year. I ride between 23-30 miles every other day and the aluminum frame is starting to kill me. I upgraded saddle, and tires, but it is clearly time for a carbon frame. I like the Fuji Gran Fondo 2.5 disk. However, I have a Trek shop near my home and they seem to look down on Fuji telling me I need to get into a Trek Domane S 5. It cost $200 more and has Tiegra instead of 105 on the Fuji as well as traditional brakes instead of disk. Is the Trek better even with lesser components?
I just want a comfortable bike I can start to put 30 to 40 miles per ride. No racing, just good exercise on country roads.
 

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Try each out and go with the one that you like. If you like Fuji go with it. If neither fit, shop elsewhere.
 

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Don't limit yourself to two brands. Different frames from different manufacturers and different models within the same manufacturer have different grades of carbon, different blends of those grades, different lay-up, and do certain things differently from one another. Carbon frame road bikes can feel vastly different from one another, particularly with the high end frames. Lower end carbon can sometimes feel pretty similar. Try different bikes with different geometry, and different attributes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Will switching to carbon help with the all vibration I get with aluminum? Will I feel the 5 pound weight difference in frames in my riding? I sure hope so. I ride a decent amount of elevation change and not always so smooth surface.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
thank you for input. I just don't know for the $2000 price range I was shooting for if there are many other players. I fear the other players come in at higher price points. Are there other brands you could recommend?
 

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My Sportif was kinda jarring, too, until I put bigger tires on. 32c Randonneurs fit fine, under fenders even. If those are to commutery, try 28c Conti Ultrasports or something similar. Drop the pressure a tad, and the ride is much smoother.
 

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Two thousand for the entire bike correct? That will limit you a little and will get you into the lower grade carbon in most brands, so then it becomes about groupset and wheels I suppose. You will feel a difference between carbon and aluminum for sure. Carbon frames can be made to be much more vertically compliant than aluminum and will provide a much more comfortable ride. With the lower priced stuff you may sacrifice some stiffness or performance, because they are not going to do extensive tuning or lay up to provide stiffness and compliance as they would with a high end frame, but there are plenty of brands that have carbon bikes in that price range.
 

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If Trek has a carbon bike at $2000, then pretty much everyone will have a carbon bike at ~$2000. you need to widen your search. Trek make perfectly fine bikes, but they aren't better or worse than Fuji or anyone else's.
Often companiy websites will list the RRP so you can check them out... otherwise just look up online stores to give you some vague idea...
(this is just an example, not suggesting anything)
Bikes Road $1,500-2,000 | Jenson USA (Page 1 of 2)
 

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The prior posts about tires are correct. Tires make the most difference in your ride than anything else. Try bigger tires; lower pressure. If you still want to buy a carbon framed bike, look at Pedal Force. No big name bike, but I bought an RS2 frame on an internet group buy, and built it up 8 years ago and it's still my favorite bike. You can have them build it, selecting components on line, and ship it a bike store if your store will work with you on it. They'll send you and the store $50.00 each. You can get such a bike for <$2,000.
Here's the website: Pedal Force super-light carbon bicycle
 

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Will switching to carbon help with the all vibration I get with aluminum? Will I feel the 5 pound weight difference in frames in my riding? I sure hope so. I ride a decent amount of elevation change and not always so smooth surface.
No. It will not help with your vibration problems.

Yes, slightly. A 5 pound difference is noticeable. You'll notice you'll use one gear down on the hills, that's about it though.

My Sportif was kinda jarring, too, until I put bigger tires on. 32c Randonneurs fit fine, under fenders even. If those are to commutery, try 28c Conti Ultrasports or something similar. Drop the pressure a tad, and the ride is much smoother.
This is your key, the tires and pressures. I suggest buying the best tires you can, I will suggest Continental GP 4000S II in 28mm size. Put those on your bike with low pressures (don't know your weight) and that'll give the comfort you are after.

Also you can double wrap your bar tape.
 

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... Trek make perfectly fine bikes, but they aren't better or worse than Fuji or anyone else's...
The Domane is a game changer as far as comfort goes. The Decoupler is a engineering element that provides shock absorption that perhaps only Pinarello has matched. My Domane is smoother and more responsive than my Time VXS which is says a lot.

The OP can always check the used market. Disc versions will be hard to find and are not really necessary unless you live in a very hill & wet area. A 2013 model with Ultegra should be in the $2k range.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I did change my saddle to a good bontrager and I did change tires to a set of Continental gator skins. Both helped, no doubt. I may lower pressure a bit from what I am reading here. I usually run at 100psi I still feel like I want a carbon frame regardless though and you guys have given me some good info. I may have to go over $2k to get what feels right to me.
 

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The Domane is a game changer as far as comfort goes. The Decoupler is a engineering element that provides shock absorption that perhaps only Pinarello has matched. My Domane is smoother and more responsive than my Time VXS which is says a lot.

The OP can always check the used market. Disc versions will be hard to find and are not really necessary unless you live in a very hill & wet area. A 2013 model with Ultegra should be in the $2k range.
I just meant in the grand scheme of making things, OP is looking just at Trek and Fuji, there is lots of other choice out there. A Trek could be perfect, or not.
 

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I bought an entry level Fuji Sportif 3.0 disk this year. I ride between 23-30 miles every other day and the aluminum frame is starting to kill me. I upgraded saddle, and tires, but it is clearly time for a carbon frame. I like the Fuji Gran Fondo 2.5 disk. However, I have a Trek shop near my home and they seem to look down on Fuji telling me I need to get into a Trek Domane S 5. It cost $200 more and has Tiegra instead of 105 on the Fuji as well as traditional brakes instead of disk. Is the Trek better even with lesser components?
I just want a comfortable bike I can start to put 30 to 40 miles per ride. No racing, just good exercise on country roads.
If you're feeling like you are getting "killed" riding 23-30 miles I highly doubt it's the frame.

Regarding your upgrades whatever that means...often times people buy more expensive components that fit just as poorly or are simply not installed correctly to feel a benefit. Often times people think the saddle is the problem when it's just their shorts. Often times people blame the tires when it's just the psi or vice versa.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I should not have said "getting killed" in retrospect. I just get a lot of aching in my hands from street vibrations by the end of the ride. I know all riders need to move hand location, but it seems a bit extreme by the mid to high 20 mile range for me.
Changing the saddle was a great move and that saddle will for sure go on my next bike.
 

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I should not have said "getting killed" in retrospect. I just get a lot of aching in my hands from street vibrations by the end of the ride. I know all riders need to move hand location, but it seems a bit extreme by the mid to high 20 mile range for me.
Changing the saddle was a great move and that saddle will for sure go on my next bike.
Can you say with 100% certainty that vibrations transmitted through the frame are the reason your hands ache? Just not getting the connection between saddle->vibration-.great move. I'm not trying to be obtuse, just trying to isolate what's going on. I don't think a saddle will actively dampen vibrations. Perhaps you inadvertently changed the tilt a little or installed it so your reach is different etc...
 

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Get something that takes bigger tires and fits perfect.

I have a steel, alloy and carbon frame. The frame does make a little difference but that difference is nothing compared to fit and being able to use tires big enough to suite your desired plushness ride level.
Does your current frame take bigger tires and fit? You probably don't need a new bike to work out the vibrations and hand discomfort. Can you lower PSI and not worry about pinch flats? Or do your current tires suck?
 

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I did change my saddle to a good bontrager and I did change tires to a set of Continental gator skins. Both helped, no doubt. I may lower pressure a bit from what I am reading here. I usually run at 100psi I still feel like I want a carbon frame regardless though and you guys have given me some good info. I may have to go over $2k to get what feels right to me.
That pretty much sums it up.
 

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I did change my saddle to a good bontrager and I did change tires to a set of Continental gator skins. Both helped, no doubt. I may lower pressure a bit from what I am reading here. I usually run at 100psi I still feel like I want a carbon frame regardless though and you guys have given me some good info. I may have to go over $2k to get what feels right to me.
What width Gatorskins? If 25 or 28, go down some pressure, even 85 or 90, unless you're a heavyweight. That will help even more. And I like the recommendation above for Conti Grand Prix 4000s in 28 width (or even 25) - significantly smoother ride than Gatorskins, although the Gatorskins are great for longevity and certainly less expensive.

If you want a carbon frame, great, go for it, but take LONG test rides, and preferably with the wheels and tires you'll be using. I've owned carbon that was really smooth, and carbon that was a jackhammer. With same wheels and tires, same saddle, same everything.
 
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