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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Yes, I understand this is a cycling forum. But I need help with my 5K time. I consider myself a cyclist who never trains for anything. This is not to say I don't push myself (which I do every ride), I just don't go out and start working on intervals. I prefer riding to running 12 times out of ten, and last week I logged 150 miles, all commuting without my normal long weekend ride.

But now I'm [kinda] motivated to do well in a 5K. My current time is around 24min. And yes, I've checked internet training schedules and they are cut out strictly for running, which I can't and won't do. I need to know what I can do on the bike during my commute that would help me with running a 5K. The only running I do is a 30 min speed run during the week and a long 6-7 mile run on the weekend.

Any thoughts or suggestions? BTW - I also have to push the BabyJogger when I run.
 

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If the longest you intend to run is honestly 3.1 miles (for a race I mean), then there is no need to have more than one day of training per week longer than that distance. Run faster, not longer. There are different ways to do that, such as running specific distances 4 times a week and gradually forcing yourself to go faster, or else running as far as you can at a specific pace and gradually forcing yourself to go farther.

I combine the two ideas in my training. For example:
One day I will run for 3 miles. The pace of this should be slower than that of a 5K race. For example, if I run an 18 min 5K race I will run this session at 19:30 or so. If your race pace is 24 minutes, I would recommend doing this in about 27. If the 24 you mentioned is how fast you do a normal easy run, then use that time as your race pace would surely be faster.

The next day I will run 400 meters at a pace similar to that if I were to run a 1 mile race, then rest (jog) for twice as long as it took me to run, then repeat for a total of 8 runs. Again, if I were to run a mile as fast as I could it would be about 5 minutes. I would therefore run these 400 m in about 1:15. Notice that this is not an all-out sprint, as a 400 m sprint would be much faster than 1:15 for me. If your 1 mile race pace would be 7:00, run each 400 in 1:45. This will be pretty easy for about 3 and then get significantly more difficult once you get to 5-8. If you are not an experienced runner start with 6 and move up to 8.

Rest a day and the repeat your 3 mile run like the first day.

Rest another day and then do your 6-7 mile run. I would recommend doing this at approximately the same pace as your 3 mile runs, which will obviously be hard to do since it is significantly longer, but go as fast as you can.

Rest a day and start over.

Every couple of weeks your paces should change. When you notice that a distance is easier to achieve in a certain time then you should reevaluate and speed up a bit.


Another idea that I have heard tossed around, but have never tried myself, goes like this: choose your race goal time. For example, that may be 18 minutes for you. Then run the longest distance you can while maintaining that pace. Can you run 2 miles in 12 min? No - can you run 1.5 mile in 9 min? No - can you run 1 mile in 6 min? No - can you run half a mile in 3 min? Yes? Run half a mile in 3 minutes, rest 3 minutes (actual rest, not a jog), and repeat until you get up to your 5K distance total. Do this 3 times a week plus a once a week long run. Every two weeks increase the distance you run so that in approx 10 weeks you can run 3 miles in 18 minutes.
 

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I just read that you have to push the BabyJogger - I assume that's a stroller of sorts. Might make things a bit tougher. Good luck.
 

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I'm thinking intervals...

but I can't imagine doing them pushing a baby jogger.

Hit the 1/4 mile track at the local high school, if they share - 1/2 lap at 6 min pace, 1/2 lap at 10 minute pace (45sec-75 sec). 30 minutes of that will work you over, but you'll get faster if you want it bad enough. And you might even be able to park the jogger in the middle with some play toys or something instead of pushing it around.

You could maybe find a park with a playground this would work at also.
 

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I used to run a lot and fairly competitively. Unless you are a very gifted runner, it is very difficult to run a fast 5k without running more miles. For example, last year I ran 20:45 on 8-12 miles per week during mountain bike race season. The only way to really bring that time down is to run more miles. Intervals are important, yes, but running 30-40 miles per week would help more.

Fast 5k requires three key workouts once basic fitness is established:
Long run: 10-12 miles.
Intervals: i.e. 12 x 400m at 5-10 sec faster than 5k race pace.
Tempo run: at least 20 min at faster than 10k pace but slower than 5k race pace.

These are examples only but you get the point. You want to run the time, you have to put in the time.
 

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Intervals my man, run intervals. Look at running some 4X800s and then some 4X1600s. If you want to get sub-20 5K times (my current goal...I am running 21:xx now) you will want to try to push your efforts into the 6-6:15 m/m range when running these intervals. Also, be SURE you are warmed up very well before running these.

I just finished training for and completing the ING half marathon and boy, distance running stinks!
 

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+10000000 for intervals. That is the only way to lower your time.
 

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A buddy and I are trying to get sub-20 5Ks and are sharing training logs/etc. If you want in on it, drop me a line and I can add you to our e-mails. It is mainly training advice and making fun of other group members. :)
 

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http://www.coolrunning.com/engine/2/2_4/99.shtml

Based on your current time...you are listed as a beginner for the purposes of this article.

Mind you...going fast before you get strong is a recipe for injury and a primary reason why people say that running is dangerous.

The amount of stress on the bones, muscles and tendons are far greater when exerting an 18 minute 5k than when going for a 24 minute 5k. Make sure your skeletal system is ready (normally a year of base training to build adequately).

You might want to have a look at this article regarding optimal run pace.
http://news.yahoo.com/s/livescience/20090329/sc_livescience/perfectrunningpacerevealed
 

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Egad y'all are overthinking this.

Success in running comes from (1) getting one's ass out the door and (2) avoiding injury.

Hills are Mother Nature's interval training.
 

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pretender said:
Egad y'all are overthinking this.

Success in running comes from (1) getting one's ass out the door and (2) avoiding injury.

Hills are Mother Nature's interval training.
Going from a 7:45 mile to a 6:25 mile takes more than just getting your ass out the door. Successful running programs are everybit as involved as any other fitness program. They better have a good plan, good nutrition, ample rest and a good deal of mental toughness.

For instance, the 2008 Cary road race had 266 male participants--18 broke the 21 minute mark on a fairly flat course

or Old Reliable Run...34 our 280 participants (male) 2 out of over 200 (female)
 

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thatsmybush said:
Going from a 7:45 mile to a 6:25 mile takes more than just getting your ass out the door. Successful running programs are everybit as involved as any other fitness program. They better have a good plan, good nutrition, ample rest and a good deal of mental toughness.

For instance, the 2008 Cary road race had 266 male participants--18 broke the 21 minute mark on a fairly flat course

or Old Reliable Run...34 our 280 participants (male) 2 out of over 200 (female)
And I ran 20:13 in my only 5K of last year on a low-mileage program of (1) get ass out of door and (2) don't shy away from hills.

Meh. If I wanted to excel at 5K, obviously I'd get more "scientific" about it. But we're talking about a guy (the OP) who currently runs twice a week.

Once you build some real endurance, then (maybe) you can start thinking about "scientific" interval training. But probably you are just kidding yourself.
 

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pretender said:
And I ran 20:13 in my only 5K of last year on a low-mileage program of (1) get ass out of door and (2) don't shy away from hills.

Meh. If I wanted to excel at 5K, obviously I'd get more "scientific" about it. But we're talking about a guy (the OP) who currently runs twice a week.

Once you build some real endurance, then (maybe) you can start thinking about "scientific" interval training. But probably you are just kidding yourself.
Some people like yourself are just more talented, gifted and straight up better than the rest of us. You should thank the stars you are one of those chosen to do great things with minimal effort.
 

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thatsmybush said:
Some people like yourself are just more talented, gifted and straight up better than the rest of us. You should thank the stars you are one of those chosen to do great things with minimal effort.
I assure you the effort was far from minimal. In fact that is my whole point, it's about putting in effort.
 

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20 x 400

My high school track and cross country coach's answer to everything was 20 quarters (20 x 440 yards). Can't remember how many times I puked after that workout.
 

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pretender said:
I assure you the effort was far from minimal. In fact that is my whole point, it's about putting in effort.

Again...good for you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Wow, thanks for all the responses. I was hoping to shy away from running as much as possible. I suppose that's not the case. I'll throw in an interval run a week. Any ideas on how long it takes to get times down?
 

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Once you start a solid program you will honestly see a small change every week (either, "Wow that 3 mile run in 24 minutes wasn't as hard as last week," or "Wow I shaved 20 seconds off that 3 mile run."). Maybe 2 weeks for it to be noticeable, and in 2 months you won't believe how far you have come.

One of the hardest things to motivate yourself to do without a trainer or training partner is push yourself. Once you notice a run getting better/more comfortable it is easy to be happy with that pace/time, but you need to speed up (that whole "Training doesn't get easier, you just get faster" thing). Like I said above I recommend reevaluating your pace every 2 weeks or so, and speeding up accordingly.
 
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