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Hello friends, my name is Vitor, I collect old bikes and I rescued a very deteriorated Raleigh double bar bike from a junkyard that I'm slowly recovering! I'm having some trouble finding information about her! The only thing I know so far is that it is a very common export model in Asia and America (I live in Brazil).

I looked up her serial number on a brand number board, but there was no mine! (EB 22 314) In the table the closest serial numbers approximated the period between 1925 and 1929, but I would love to try to know the exact year of production!

A pleasant surprise I had was to find under some old black paint the original color of it, ''Crimson'' despite quite faded and worn was very cool!

Finally, here are some pictures of her from when I saved her from the junkyard and how she is now!

I would be grateful if someone can help me find out more about this bike!

I apologize for the errors in the text, my English is not very fluent, I had to use google translator, hugs!

Vitor from Brazil.



Bicycle Tire Wheel Bicycles--Equipment and supplies Bicycle handlebar
Bicycle Bicycles--Equipment and supplies Bicycle wheel rim Tire Wheel





Bicycle Wheel Tire Bicycles--Equipment and supplies Bicycle wheel rim
Tire Wheel Bicycle wheel rim Bicycle wheel Bicycle tire
Bicycle Tire Wheel Bicycle wheel Land vehicle
Tire Wheel Land vehicle Bicycle wheel Bicycle tire
Water Wood Bicycle part Spoke Metal
Line Font Red Material property Parallel
 

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Russian Troll Farmer
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That type of bicycle (and I'm not convinced is IS a Raleigh; does it have a head badge?) was ubiquitous in post-war England and Europe, and is still made in places like India and China (see "Flying Pigeon" bicycles). The chainwheel looks like it's made from stamped steel, which would suggest manufacture from the 1970's onward. The rack on the back looks like it's from around the same time. If it were TRULY a Raleigh from the period between the wars, every thread on it would be a Whitworth standard thread, so a quick way to check is whether axle nuts are a common thread size or an oddball (like Whitworth, which was famous for using unusual thread pitches, like 22 TPI...). The wheel looks shiny, so if it's aluminum, consider a post 1980 manufacture date, and if it's chromed steel, that would be post-war. Before the war, steel rims were painted if they were even metal; wood was still common. Also, in 1929-era bikes, I'd expect to see a skip-tooth chain, rather than the common "2 teeth per inch" chains of today.
 

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The one thing that makes me think it might be a Raleigh is the fork - it has that unusual barrel-type crown. Factoid: there was a feature on some more pricey Raleigh models for that barrel to house a fork lock. In terms of dating it - who knows.

A good resource for all things Old Raleigh is Sheldon Brown's (RIP) website.

Retro Raleighs (sheldonbrown.com)

Good luck fixing it up, whatever it is....
 

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Russian Troll Farmer
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The one thing that makes me think it might be a Raleigh is the fork - it has that unusual barrel-type crown. ... .....
Yeah, but so did just about every other "town bike" built in England, Holland, Belgium, France, Italy, Spain, etc. Plus the more recent copies in China, as well as the bikes made in India/Pakistan from old English tooling...
 
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