Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 3 of 3 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
67 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I posted earlier about converting my old road colnago into a sort of cyclocross bike. I want to ride on the cobble stone city roads, a bit of fire roads and of course the smooth street. Problem is, my old italian bike has measurements uncommon to new road bike and also to any cyclocross frames (brake system, bb width, headset). So I am actually looking for an old road bike (my current bike is too large, another reason I want to set up a new rig) frame to fit me (5'5" 28" inseam) and be able to swap out all my old components. I think the most important thing for me to change would be the fork so the ride is a bit smoother. I was thinking of a good cyclocross type carbon fork on an old small roadie frame. That way I can keep my heaset and BB. and the drivetrain.

In finding a road frame I need to know what size my headset, BB and I suppose the fork tube length are. How do I measure these parts? I've seen parts for sale with measurements but I don't know what they mean. I imaginge they had a width measurement and a diameter measurement. How can I match these parts up with a new frame. As I said before, I want s smal frame that I can swap all my old components to and change the fork so I can ride more places than just smooth roads.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
67 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The bike is a ca 88'. I posted a pic in the colnago forum under flankwood. It's pink and white. It was a give away from a friend and I will surely keep the frame but I wanted to use the components on a new frame. All Dura Ace parts so I really couldn't afford to beat the quality on my current budget; even thougth the components are 20 yrs old. I just like the parts, craftsmanship, and good light weight steel frames. I'll check out old Sheldon. I love his site but I still don't understand how parts ae measured
 

· Registered
Joined
·
67 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yeah I think I shouldn't mess with a classic. I'll save up for a loaded x cross. It's too nice to mess with. Thanks---and Sheldon has plenty of info, just looked in the wrong places at first.
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top